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I'm addicted to old photos of people traveling during the Golden Age of travel, and this found photo from +Dwayne Fuhlhage is very cool. Check out his collection - he has some great stories behind the pictures and slides he's found over the years.

#travel   #slides   #oldphotos   #travelpictures   #goldenageoftravel   #vintagestyle  

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A Proper Arrival

PanAm history plays a major role in identifying the where and when of this photo from the big bag of goodness. The PanAm Stratocruisers ushered in a new era of luxury travel. The stats are really depressing compared to today's cramped cattle car aircraft.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_377_Stratocruiser

The Clipper Celestial in the background flew from San Francisco to Honolulu from 1949-1961. That's a pretty broad range, but better than most for found images. The same air frame flew under different names, so it was likely towards the beginning of the time span.

Here's more information to be depressed about the next time you get in coach in a modern plane. So many postcards at http://www.ovi.ch/b377/pcs/paa.html
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Perfectly said.

h/t to +Mobile RVing: The Buzz 

#redwoodnationalpark   #california  

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The essence of travel is the images and feelings it leaves with us. Vintage travel posters bring us the essence of nostalgia while reminding us where we have been and where we want to go. Here is one such image for Redwood National Park (http://ow.ly/ZUj0d). One RV Park right on the edge of its entrance is Redwoods River Resort (http://ow.ly/ZUpHH) in Leggett, CA. Photo & Reference Thanks to Anderson Design Group store. #vintage #travelposters #destinations #bucketlist #visitcalifornia
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The First Flight of the Boeing 747

Aviation #geek  that I am, I could watch these all day long, but I'll give special props if even 2 other people watch this to the end. It takes a special kind of fan to relive educational films from the 60s. ha!

#boeing747   #firstflight   #flying   #airplane   #aircraft   #boeing   #goldenageoftravel   #jetage  

The film's full title is "New Dimension: First Flight Of The Boeing 747 Superjet", and it includes exclusive in-the-cockpit footage during the first 747 flight.

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The Normandie: On This Day In History in 1942, She Burned in New York City

The Normandie, regarded by many as the most elegant ocean liner ever built, burns and sinks in New York Harbor during its conversion to an Allied trip transport ship.

Built in France in the early 1930s, the Normandie ruled the transatlantic passenger trade in its day. The first major liner to cross the Atlantic in less than four days, its masterful engineering was only surpassed by its design excellence. The 1,000-foot ship’s distinctive clipper-ship bow was immediately recognizable, and its elaborate architecture and decorations popularized the Moderne style.

After the American entrance into World War II, it was seized by the U.S. Navy for the Allied war effort and renamed the U.S.S. Lafayette. However, on February 9, 1942–just days before it was to be completed for trooping–a welder accidentally set fire to a pile of flammable life preservers with his torch, and by early the next morning the ship lay capsized in the harbor, a gutted wreck. It was later towed south to New Jersey and scrapped.

#vintagetravel   #thenormandie   #ship   #oceanliner   #1930s   #wwii   #history   #maritimehistory   

I remember reading about this ship as a young boy, and even then, I was fascinated with its design and opulence...

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/normandie-burns-in-new-york

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2016-02-08
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Concorde Takes Off On This Day In History - 21 January, 1976

Since I started flying the Puddle Jumpers at a very early age, and being right there at the beginning of the Jet Age, I had always wanted to fly the Concorde. That dream never happened -  but maybe one day we'll have a new form of supersonic flight, and I'll be first in line, ready for this experience!

From London’s Heathrow Airport and Orly Airport outside Paris, the first Concordes with commercial passengers simultaneously take flight on January 21, 1976. The London flight was headed to Bahrain in the Persian Gulf, and the Paris to Rio de Janeiro via Senegal in West Africa. At their cruising speeds, the innovative Concordes flew well over the sound barrier at 1,350 miles an hour, cutting air travel time by more than half.

The flights were the culmination of a 12-year effort that pitted English and French engineers against their counterparts in the USSR. In 1962, 15 years after U.S. pilot Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier, Britain and France signed a treaty to develop the world’s first supersonic passenger airline. The next year, President John F. Kennedy proposed a similar U.S. project. Meanwhile, in the USSR, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev ordered his top aviation engineers to beat the West to the achievement.

There were immense technical challenges in building a supersonic airliner. Engines would need to be twice as powerful as those built for normal jets, and the aircraft’s frame would have to withstand immense pressure from shock waves and endure high temperatures caused by air friction. In the United States, Boeing tackled the supersonic project but soon ran into trouble with its swing-wing design. In England and France, however, early results were much more promising, and Khrushchev ordered Soviet intelligence to find out as much as possible about the Anglo-French prototypes.

In 1965, the French arrested Sergei Pavlov, head of the Paris office of the Soviet airliner Aeroflot, for illegally obtaining classified information about France’s supersonic project. Another high-level Soviet spy remained unknown, however, and continued to feed the Soviets information about the Concorde until his arrest in 1977.

On December 31, 1968, just three months before the first scheduled flight of the Concorde prototype, the fruits of Soviet industrial espionage were revealed when the Soviet’s TU-144 became the world’s first supersonic airliner to fly. The aircraft looked so much like the Concorde that the Western press dubbed it “Konkordski.”

In 1969, the Concorde began its test flights. Two years later, the United States abandoned its supersonic program, citing budget and environmental concerns. It was now up to Western Europe to make supersonic airline service viable before the Soviets. Tests continued, and in 1973 the TU-144 came to the West to appear alongside the Concorde at the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget airport. On June 3, in front of 200,000 spectators, the Concorde flew a flawless demonstration. Then it was the TU-144’s turn. The aircraft made a successful 360-degree turn and then began a steep ascent. Abruptly, it leveled off and began a sharp descent. Some 1,500 feet above the ground, it broke up from overstress and came crashing into the ground, killing all six Soviet crew members and eight French civilians.

Soviet and French investigators ruled that pilot error was the cause of the accident. However, in recent years, several of the Russian investigators have disclosed that a French Mirage intelligence aircraft was photographing the TU-144 from above during the flight. A French investigator confirmed that the Soviet pilot was not told that the Mirage was there, a breach of air regulations. After beginning his ascent, the pilot may have abruptly leveled off the TU-144 for fear of crashing into this aircraft. In the sudden evasive maneuver, the thrust probably failed, and the pilot then tried to restart the engines by entering a dive. He was too close to the ground, however, and tried to pull up too soon, thus overstressing the aircraft.

In exchange for Soviet cooperation in the cover-up, the French investigators agreed not to criticize the TU-144’s design or engineering. Nevertheless, further problems with the TU-144, which was designed hastily in its bid to beat the Concorde into the air, delayed the beginning of Soviet commercial service. Concorde passenger service began with much fanfare in January 1976. Western Europe had won its supersonic race with the Soviets, who eventually allowed just 100 domestic flights with the TU-144 before discontinuing the airliner.

The Concorde was not a great commercial success, however, and people complained bitterly about the noise pollution caused by its sonic booms and loud engines. Most airlines declined to purchase the aircraft, and just 16 Concordes were built for British Airways and Air France. Service was eventually limited between London and New York and Paris and New York, and luxury travelers appreciated the less than four-hour journey across the Atlantic.

On July 25, 2000, an Air France Concorde crashed 60 seconds after taking off from Paris en route to New York. All 109 people aboard and four on the ground were killed. The accident was caused by a burst tire that ruptured a fuel tank, creating a fire that led to engine failure. The fatal accident–the first in Concorde’s history–signaled the decline of the aircraft. On October 24, 2003, the Concorde took its last regular commercial flight.

#concorde   #supersonic   #jetage   #supersonicflight   #flying   #airplanes   #konkordski   #ussr   #uk   #france   #heathrow   #orly  

via/ history.com/this-day-in-history/concorde-takes-off

image | Getty Images

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Roadside Attractions

These always seemed particularly American to me until I traveled abroad. I think you can see oddball places all over the world. I know we had many along old Route 66, and I'd like to know if you have (or had) any in your country.

Summer is over here, but it will be starting up soon in other parts of the world. What great, quirky, oddball roadside attractions can you tell us about?

#roadsideattraction   #worldtravel   #usatravel   #summertravel   #southernhemisphere   #quirkyplaces  

via/flickr.com/photos/jenphotography/galleries/72157622558605651/

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Icon of the Skies: A Look Back at the Early Days of the Boeing 747

A two-story airplane may have seemed like science fiction before the Boeing 747 rolled out in the late 1960s. Since then, the "Queen of the Skies" has grown to be a passenger pleaser, an instantly recognizable silhouette on tarmacs around the world, and a marvel of modern engineering. Here are some of our favorite images from the history of the jumbo jet (from Condé Nast Traveler)

#boeing747   #jetage   #747airplanes   #airplane   #coolplanes  

via/ cntraveler.com/galleries/2015-09-10/icon-of-the-skies-a-look-back-at-the-early-days-of-the-boeing-747

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2015-09-13
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interior of Le Comptoir Général in Paris

Question: What is one of the coolest bars/nightclubs/coffee joints you've been to? Anywhere in the world. It can be a single place, or a list, and stories add flavor!

For me, I have a few. Club Can't Tell, in Sacramento, was an old theater that had live shows with bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers and all the 80s greats. And below that, there was a subterranean bar right out of the movies. Loved a few joints in Dingle, Ireland. Was at the closing night for a cop bar in the Mission in San Francisco, where they literally gave us the paintings off the wall. 

Convict Club in Prague holds many memories of good times, as does The Bunkr, a subterranean dance club also in Prague. Also loved doing karaoke in New York with a whole bunch of plussers a few years back. Then, there were little dives and holes-in-the-wall in Paris, hotel bars in London when I was on my first trip to Europe at fifteen, memorable joints in Warsaw and Amsterdam, and a hundred other great places in between.

So, what are your favorites, and let's hear the stories about why they were or are so great!

#bar   #nightclub   #dancehall   #danceclub   #subterranean   #worldtravel  

via/ daniellucasfaro.com/paris-style-guide/
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The Best Lakes You've Ever Visited

Can you name some of your favorites? Some of the best you've visited around the world?

For me, I spent every summer on Lake Delhi in Iowa; I have a ton of great memories at one of the most magnificent Alpine lakes in the world, Lake Tahoe, and I spent some years living on Big Bear Lake in California. But there are hundreds more I remember from my travels.

What are your favourite lakes, why, and where are they? What stories do you have to go along with your visits?

#lakes   #lakeside   #travel   #summervacation   #seeingtheworld  

via/ dropdeadgorgeousdaily.com

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London At Sunset

A glorious shot and a reminder to get back to London one day again soon...

#london   #unitedkingdom   #UK   #travel   #worldtravel   #bigben  

via/ europealacarte.co.uk/blog/2010/07/22/best-london-travel-tips-best-things-to-do-in-london/

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