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My manuscript Reparations for Slavery is revised and sent back to the publisher for the copy-editing process. The book is expected to be out on November 2 2017 ! It can be pre-ordered via the link below #slaveryarchive


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"As fugitive slaves made their way to freedom in Canada, they stopped in
Detroit, where visits to churches today illuminate the hardships they endured." #slaveryarchive

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"Over time, escaped slaves and a group of Creeks built a community here. They hunted, foraged and cultivated farms that stretched for miles upriver. Word spread. Runaways kept coming. The community swelled to more than 800." #slaveryarchive 

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"As I walked along Pearl Street then, I had no idea that Fraunces Tavern had been owned by Samuel Fraunces, a man whose true racial identity continues to be in question — many believe he was of mixed race and passing as white. There are white folks who vehemently disagree. During the Revolutionary War, he was referred to as “Black Sam” and Fraunces Tavern was called Black Sam’s. Hmm … Fraunces also served as a steward to George Washington." #slaveryarchive


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"What’s clear from all these locations is Pittsburgh’s significance in the history of the Underground Railroad. What is also clear is that it seems that along the way, that information stopped being taught in school. Sure, many of us probably learned the basics: Pittsburgh’s involvement in the Underground Railroad helped approximately 100,000 slaves escape." #slaveryarchive


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"The British North American provinces, or Canada, were among the most storied termini of the Underground Railroad. At least 30,000 African-American men, women and children — fugitive slaves — fled the American South and made their way to Canada. The overwhelming majority settled in the southwestern portion of Ontario, where many of them forged new identities as African-Canadians." #slaveryarchive


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"Eliza was fleeing her captors with her young son in her arms when she was stopped short by the banks of the frigid Ohio River. With the unthinking courage that comes from desperation, she leapt from one ice floe to another, occasionally falling into the freezing water and hoisting herself up, until arriving on the riverbank across the state line. After witnessing her harrowing journey, a white man who should have captured her ended up helping her ashore instead, directing her to a safe house rather than into the arms of her pursuers." #slaveryarchive



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"The Episcopal Churches of Maryland commemorated the 150th anniversary of the official abolishment of chattel slavery in Maryland on All Saints’ Day, Nov. 1, 2014, with the Trail of Souls: Truth and Reconciliation Pilgrimage. This day-long journey visited five Maryland sites with strong ties the both slavery and the Episcopal Church. But this was just the beginning.

An online pilgrimage of 23 churches and diocesan sites found on this website is a virtual tour and living legacy that is destined to grow in scope and participation. The Trail of Souls offers a chance to visit the Episcopal Churches of Maryland and witness them in a new light – looking at the legacy of slavery and the impact it still bears witness to today. As more churches discover and write their history they will be added to the web portal." #slaveryarchive

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"Slavery is a thread stitched indelibly throughout the early history of the Episcopal Church in Maryland, where congregations to varying degrees enabled, benefited from or fought against the enslavement of Africans until slavery was outlawed by the state in 1864." #slaveryarchive



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"Dean says idea of eradicating slave trader’s memory is tricky but discussion could be had about taking out stained glass window." #slaveryarchive
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