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The counterpoise of a scarab pectoral from the tomb of Tutankhamun with straps formed from inlaid plaques with uraeus (cobras), scarabs and solar discs. The pendant is in the form of the scarab beetle holding the sun aloft flanked by two uraeus.
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Louis L'Amour drinking Huggings Young Coffee.
I am wishing all of my G+ friends and followers the very best. If you like coffee and live in the USA would you be so kind as to take my coffee survey to help me decide if I should create my own Andrews On The Road Coffee Club.
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScG8DV89HmdhcFB7E9fqizsZZ2KF3si9_P36J8F7IucZ_rFfQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

More information about Louis L'Amour from wiki
Louis Dearborn L'Amour - March 22 1908 –June 10 1988
Louis L'Amour was an American novelist and short story writer. His books consisted primarily of Western novels (though he called his work 'frontier stories'); however, he also wrote historical fiction (The Walking Drum), science fiction (The Haunted Mesa), non-fiction (Frontier), as well as poetry and short-story collections. Many of his stories were made into films and John Wayne once made the dubious assertion that L'Amour was the most interesting man in the world. L'Amour's books remain popular and most have gone through multiple printings. At the time of his death almost all of his 105 existing works (89 novels, 14 short-story collections, and two full-length works of nonfiction) were still in print, and he was considered "one of the world's most popular writers".


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Ancient Greek terracotta statuette of a kriophoros (ram-bearer). Artist unknown; ca. 650-600 BCE. Found on Crete; now in the Cleveland Museum of Art.
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Romper Room and the magic mirror.
Mary Ann King was the host of Romper Room in Los Angeles, she passed away a little over a year ago. She was a great lady who was very involved with community events and community television. I think we will all miss her.


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Embroidered and padded suede leather doublet with taffeta lining, Italian, late 16th-early 17th C.
Museo Stibbert, Firenze

I think I may have posted this one a little over a year ago. 

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Statues of the Irukaptah’s family, east wall from the Mastaba of Irukaptah “tomb of the butchers”, Saqqara. Old Kingdom, 5th Dynasty, ca. 2494-2345 BC.

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CHARIOTS IN CHINESE WARFARE:

Quote from original post - THE chariot was used in Chinese warfare from around 1250 BCE but enjoyed its heyday between the 8th and 5th century BCE when various states were constantly battling for control of China. Employed as a status symbol, a shock weapon, to pursue the enemy, or as transport for archers and commanders, it was used effectively in many battles of the period.
Eventually, with the rise of lighter and more mobile infantry and especially following the introduction of cavalry, its limitations were more exposed with the consequence that the chariot became relegated to a peripheral role in warfare from the 3rd century BCE.

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Bronze Ax-head.
End of the 2nd millennium B.C.
Museum of Georgia

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Elephant - Place of origin: Japan.
Period: Kamakura period, 1185-1333
Date: ca. 1250
Medium: Wood, metal, crystal, and pigments.

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Brick from The Great Ziggurat of Ur with dog paw prints.
Dating from the 3rd Dynasty of Ur (circa. 2112-2004 B.C.) now in the British Museum.
Pets have been walking over our stuff and leaving an impression on history since the dawn of civilization.

More info on Ziggurats from wiki
Ziggurats were built by the ancient Sumerians, Akkadians, Assyrians, Elamites, Eblaites and Babylonians for local religions, predominantly Mesopotamian religion and Elamite religion. Each ziggurat was part of a temple complex which included other buildings. The precursors of the ziggurat were raised platforms that date from the Ubaid period[1] during the sixth millennium. The earliest ziggurats began as a platform (usually oval, rectangular or square), the ziggurat was a mastaba-like structure with a flat top. Sun-baked bricks made up the core of the ziggurat with facings of fired bricks on the outside. Each step was slightly smaller than the step below it. The facings were often glazed in different colors and may have had astrological significance. Kings sometimes had their names engraved on these glazed bricks. The number of floors ranged from two to seven.

More info on The Great Ziggurat of Ur from wiki
The Ziggurat (or Great Ziggurat) of Ur is a Neo-Sumerian ziggurat in what was the city of Ur near Nasiriyah, in present-day Dhi Qar Province, Iraq. The structure was built during the Early Bronze Age, but had crumbled to ruins by the 6th century BCE of the Neo-Babylonian period when it was restored by King Nabonidus.

The ziggurat was built by King Ur-Nammu who dedicated the great ziggurat of Ur in honour of Nanna/Sîn, in approximately the 21st century BCE during the Third Dynasty of Ur. The massive step pyramid measured 64 m (210 ft) in length, 45 m (148 ft) in width and over 30 m (98 ft) in height. The height is speculative, as only the foundations of the Sumerian ziggurat have survived.
The ziggurat was a piece in a temple complex that served as an administrative center for the city, and which was a shrine of the moon god Nanna, the patron deity of Ur.

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