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In case you haven't seen, we're making a table of exotic gunpowder types.
Let's create gunpowder varieties for our dungeonverses

+Gherhartd Sildoenfein started this:

1. Kobold gunpowder is made from flammable beetle dung and has a very distinctive smell stink. Don't get caught in kobold gunpowder smoke clouds. (Check CON or become ill until you can rest.)

So I made a couple more:

2. Archmage gunpowder can be snorted for magical power - it works as a magical component.

3. Ironsmoke is made by the clan of dwarves of the same name. It uses white sulfur, harvested deep underground, in ghostworm infested caves. Guns that use it never get damaged.

4. Woodland gunpowder draws its special quality from dead treant charcoal. It has very respectable stopping power, but its flames are harmless and it will never set fire to anything. It has semi religious significance in elven culture and only the Knights of the Everburning Soul are allowed to use it.

5. The assassin's dust is rare and extremely valuable. It is made with dried and powdered displacer beast spleen and blessed during a ceremony that requires the sacrifice of an invisible stalker. A gun loaded with this gunpowder produces only the briefest of flashes and no more noise than a cat's yawn.

6. Red gunpowder is very common, mostly because those pyromaniac bastards red goblins are somehow found in every major city. It produces loud whistling and colourful lights than can be quite distracting.

And now it's your turn! Let's make a whole table full of gunpowders.
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#wehadthesebeforetheywerecool
Still, I want one :D
Character Sheet Mugs on Sale Now!
Following on from the Dungeon Mug I produced a few months ago, I've now added a Character Sheet Mug to the range. A complete B/X Character Sheet on a mug. These standard 330ml diswasher-safe mugs have been printed with complete character sheet that can be w...
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Electrumorado (kids and dads edition) at Gael Con. Lucky exploration rolls, reasonably careful players. So far, so good.
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I'll be running a point crawl for the next episode of Dangers & Décisions, so I'm looking at the wilderness procedure again. This has less areas than the dungeon template, and I've fiddled with the population types as well.

So far I have (in decreasing encounter probability):
- Faction leader (in charge of the whole place)
- Invaders (outsiders that are hostile to the local faction)
- Faction members
- Locals (whether they are aligned with the faction or not)
- Predators (animals, beasts, monsters...)
- Danger (natural or magical)
- Animals (less dangerous than the predators, can be hunted)
- Visitors (peaceful or non-aligned outsiders)
- Danger (same as above - should I make two different ones?)
- Prisoners (either escaping or still in chain)
- Pests (annoying but not necessarily deadly)
- Rebels (potential ally from the faction)

I have yet to draw a map and see if I can put all these encounters in a location in a believable way. In the mean time, what do you think of the population categories? Am I missing something obvious that you'd find in overground sandboxes.
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So Ben is making a game using MM. Check out the collection for the cast of characters and a very entertaining AP of the first session.
Dungeon, Inc. Pitch

Since time immemorial, wise ones have wondered about the coherence of these dangerous but lucrative places often called Dungeons. Adventurers explore them, and should they survive the monsters and traps they face, they exit richer than they entrered.

But why do these places exist at all? Why has such a diversity of monsters decided to settle them? Who resets the traps after the last adventurers triggered them? And for that matter, where are the bodies of the last adventurers who failed to survive the traps or monsters? Places that are so easy to hear about (just hit the local tavern or talk to any village chief and rumours will abound pointing to the nearest Dungeon) must after all be much frequented.

The truth known by very few is that Dungeons, or at least the largest of them are actually corporations. They are managed by leaders who recruit monsters, establish the maps of the places they settle in, build traps and handle the visiting adventurers. Why? The oldest reason in the world: money. Adventurers may think they will find riches in dungeons, but in fact they bring in their own wealth: full purses, magical devices or weapons, divine medallions, even golden teeth.

In a nutshell, Dungeon, Inc. kills adventurers and grows rich from their wealth. It’s their business model, at least when things go right. Because such an operation actually requires a lot of money up front and is complex to set up and maintain: one must attract adventurers through the spreading of rumours, the abduction of village children; once in a while, an adventurer must get out enriched, otherwise the lure would grow cold fast. Monsters need to be recruited, traps maintained, places mapped so the monsters know where to find the adventurers and how to best deal with them.

Higher up in the organisation’s hierarchy, investors must be found to expand the Dungeon, and provisions must be made to ensure they will make money too. Employee unrest must be kept at a minimum without salaries exploding. Most importantly perhaps, the organisation must ensure that all of this remains a secret: if adventurers start going around and telling other adventurers it’s all staged to ensure their deaths, it’s not going to be good for the business.

In Dungeon, Inc. you play receivers, part of the Client Services division. Your role is to welcome the adventurers, generally with broad swings of your nailed clubs. You are the Dungeon’s fieldworkers, equipped with maps of the levels where adventurers have been spotted. Your role is to take advantage of the fact you know the terrain to eliminate them as fast as possible. Your aspiration is to spend your stipend in the Dungeon’s company stores, inns and brothels; indeed, the Dungeon is a thoughtful employer and knows your well-being to be paramount.

And who knows, if you do your work really well, you might become Employee of the Month and for a few days have access to the salons and entertainment opportunities of your betters. This is how you get the chance to frequent the cream of the company’s most promising managers in this great family that is Dungeon, Inc.
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Macchiato Monsters: where we're at

I've been playing a lot of MM these past few months. When running, I've made a point to test the campaign tools. On Thursday night I ran a last minute game and I came up with the plot, location, and characters using the die drops right at the table - I think it was the first time that happened. And on Tuesday we played through a prepared pointcrawl where the exploration, mass combat, and morale rules created some unexpected, fun results (at least from my side of the table).

The latest procedure mesh well with the rest of the game, and players seem to have fun with them. It looks like they add depth rather than complexity. So yeah, I'm pretty happy with the way it's going. And I don't see much that needs fixing right now.

I've started working on the last module I know I will need: domain game rules. I'll try to keep them simple and easy, so that referees and players can use them as inspiration more than anything else. And after that I'll be ready to think about reorganising the book(s) into Edition for Realsies.

Soon, I hope.

Edit: I should add that there's quite a bit of discussion and testing happening in the community. Worth a look if you're interested in procedures to make your GM life easier :)
https://plus.google.com/communities/109415308311806403291
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Last game of #LasagnaCon: six explorers search for Electrumorado and find a lost temple to Kasinous, ancient god of fate, and set a bunch of headless frogmen on fire.
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Somewhere in the jungles of a nameless island lie the ruins of Electrumorado...

Looks I'll have a proper adventure to run this weekend at LasagnaCon! Possibly too long an adventure for a single slot though. I wonder would people sign up for a game over two days?
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The youngest hacker of Macchiato Monsters is an 8-year old (thanks to Cathia who ran for him and his 5-year old sister!).

And it's not just fluff: looks like the equipment table can use d30s as well!
Pendant ces vacances, j'ai initié mes 2 enfants aux Jeux de Roles, avec un petit scénario sur Macchiato Monsters (http://quenouille.com/macchiato-monsters-dungeonverse-build-together/) ou du moins une version simplifiée.
Dés le lendemain, mon ainé (8 ans) s'est lancé dans la création de son propre système de JdR (ce qui m'a permis de dormir 30min de plus pendant qu'il masterisait un playtest pour sa soeur).

Je vous livre en avant première la table d'équipement aléatoire et la feuille de perso. Bientot le kickstarter ! :D

+Eric Nieudan
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05/08/2017
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