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A canteen is a container designed to hold drinking water, originally designed for farm workers and soldiers and today used by hikers and mountain climbers. The earliest canteens were nothing more than hollowed out gourds or leather bags with a shoulder strap. By the 18th century, canteens such as this one were made of wood. Later, canteens consisted of a glass bottle in a woven basket cover. The bottle was usually closed with a cork stopper. Canteens in the mid 19th century were made of metal — tin-plated steel, stainless steel or aluminum — with a screw cap, the cap frequently being secured to the bottle neck with a short chain or strap to prevent loss. These were an improvement over glass bottles, but were subject to developing pinhole leaks if dented, dropped or bumped against jagged rocks. Today’s canteens, usually made of plastic, are not only lighter but leak resistant. #antiques #canteen #19thcentury #soldier #farmer #gourds #stainlesssteel #tinplatedsteel #aluminum
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Distinguished by its imposing size, this spectacular mirror stand demonstrates the decorative tradition of Chinese Ming style furniture. The back simulates a five-panel screen of the type used as the backdrop for thrones. The panels each have dragon-head terminals and their openwork carving is decorated with sinuous dragons and phoenixes amid clouds. The drawers are embellished with auspicious flowers and phoenixes while the railing posts terminate in dragons and lotus blossoms. A round mirror would have been supported on the s-shaped easel whose central openwork panel displays a four-clawed, horned dragon. Extensive use of highly detailed imperial imagery in aristocratic huang-hua-li furniture is rare, and it may be that this exceptional dressing table cabinet once belonged to a woman of the royal household. The chest is fitted with five deep drawers made entirely of huang-hua-li wood means "yellow flowering pear" wood. It is a member of the rosewood family and is botanically classified as Dalbergia odorifera.. They would have provided ample storage for hairpins, combs, and cosmetics. #antiques #Chinese #cosmeticcase #huanghualiwood #lotusblossom #pearwood #mirrorstand #dragons
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Created by several American glass factories from 1916 to the early 1930s, iridescent stretch glass is a pressed or blown molded glass. It’s shaped and formed—pressed or blown into molds—reheated and then sprayed with a metallic salt or dope, a procedure called doping, while the piece is still hot. The glass blower then reheats the piece and this is when the stretch marks occur. The glass expands faster where the dope blower applied the dope, which causes a crackled, web-like appearance on the glass. Further shaping emphasizes these stretch marks. Some blowers often shape or "work" the glass a lot which emphasizes the stretch marks in the iridescence while others don’t work their pieces as much, resulting in finer stretch marks and are only satiny. #collectibles #stretchglass #20thcentury #moldedglass #irridescentglass #doping #glassblowers
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An orrery is a mechanical model of the solar system that illustrates or predicts the relative positions and motions of the planets and moons. Historians acknowledge that clockmakers George Graham and ThomasTompion invented the first orrery around 1704. Graham gave the first model, or its design, to the celebrated instrument maker John Rowley of London to make a copy for Prince Eugene of Savoy. Rowley was commissioned to make another copy for his patron Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery, from which the device took its name in English. In use for several centuries, the device was formerly called a planetarium. An orrery also represented the relative sizes of the heavenly bodies, but since accurate scaling is often not practical due to the actual large ratio differences, a subdued approximation would have been used instead. These devices were typically driven by a clockwork mechanism with a globe representing the Sun at the center, and with a planet at the end of each of the arms. This miniature orrery by Troughton of London, dating from the late #18th century to the early 19th century, features armillary bands and an octagonal base and shows three planets including the Earth and Moon. #antiques #orrery #solarsystem #GeorgeGraham #CharlesBoyle #EarlofOrrery #planetarium #England
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Anglo Indian boxes were made in India for the English residents from the early 18th century. They were brought back or sent back to England usually by the people who had commissioned them. These boxes originated in either East India or West India. The former became known as Vizagapatam work and the latter as Bombay work. From the middle to the end of the 18th century ivory and tortoiseshell veneered boxes were usually of rectangular shape. They stood on a narrowly protruding base and the lid, which was just flat, also protruded to the same extent as the base. Sometimes the larger boxes had drop handles. By the last two decades of the 18th century the densely engraved borders gave way to Neo Classical designs which were already fashionable in England. The decoration became more linear with delicate garlands and Greek key patterns. All of the veneered boxes, ivory, quill and horn, were made in different shapes from the first decades of the 19th century. The decoration on the borders became more varied and sometimes it even included oriental motifs. The early 19th century horn boxes were made in very robust architectural shapes. They often had stepped or canted lids of radiating reeded segments culminating in turned and fluted finials. They stood on turned feet, which showed up the form to full advantage. By the middle of the century shapes became simpler and smaller, sometimes domed, covered with flat horn veneer. This Anglo-Indian carved bone sewing box, dating from between 1780 and 1830, features a top panel depicting an accord between Indian officials and British officers #antiques #AngloIndian #18thcentury #boxes #ivory #horn #veneer #sewingbox #Neoclassic #Vizagapatamstyle #EastIndia #Westindia #Bombaystyle
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Ancient Chinese people believed the dragon represented evolution from the ancestors and qi energy. The presence of dragons within Chinese culture dates back several thousands of years with the discovery of a dragon statue dating back to the fifth millennium B.C.E. , and jade badges of rank in coiled form have been excavated from the Hongshan culture circa 4700 to 2900 B.C.E.
The coiled dragon or snake form played an important role in early Chinese culture. The character for "dragon" in the earliest Chinese writing has a similar coiled form, as do later jade dragon amulets from the Shang period. Ancient Chinese referred to unearthed dinosaur bones as “sleeping dragon” bones. This porcelain plate, dating to the late 19th century during the reign of the Guangxu Emperor, the 11th emperor of the Qing Dynasty, features swirling red oxide dragon decoration. #antiques #porcelain #Chinese #dragon #sleepingdragon #QingDynasty #GuangxuEmperor #qienergy #ancestors
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An 18th-century writing table had a series of drawers, containing writing implements, directly under the surface of the table, so that it could also serve as a desk. Most had the usual divisions for the inkwell, the blotter and the sand or powder tray in one of the drawers, and a surface covered with leather or some other material less hostile to the quill or the fountain pen than simple hard wood. A writing table is a pedestal desk without the pedestals, having legs instead to hold it up. This is why such tables were sometimes called leg desks. Writing tables built in the French style were often referred to as a “bureau plat.” A reading and writing table with an easel for books that was adjustable on a ratchet and drawers fitted for writing implements was a mid-18th century English invention that was only popular as long as people read while standing. As with many other desk forms, antique writing tables were sometimes built with a complex mechanism of gears and levers to make sections slide out or pop up when certain panels were pulled. People called these mechanical desks. #antiques #writingtable #mechanicaldesk #French
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To glass lovers the name "Jack-in-the-Pulpit" has become synonymous with glass vases styled to imitate a wild flower. This flower is native to some parts of the United States, but this style of glassware originated in England, where no jack-in-the-pulpit flowers don’t grow. Most likely, this design came from the adaptation of a similar wildflower found in England known as Lords and Ladies. Like the flower, a glass Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase consists of three parts, a base, a stem and the trumpet. The trumpet is the large flared top which gives the piece its style, much like the trumpet forms the flower on the plant. The stem connects that trumpet to the base, much like the stem connects the flower to its root. Trumpets vary in style, from flared, rounded trumpets, to those with pinched and twisted points in the front and the back. Some trumpets, particularly those by Fenton Glass, have a raised back and dip downward in the front. #collectibles #FentonGlassWorks #WestVirginia #jackinthepulpit #vase #trumpets
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Early sewing needles were precious items and easily lost, so needlecases were a necessity for storing these fragile objects. They’re often small, decorative, tubular containers of bone, ivory, wood, or bronze with tight-fitting stoppers, often designed to hang from a belt. Elaborate ones sometimes took the form of animals or figures. Heavily decorated silver and brass needlecases are typical of the Victorian period. Between 1869 and 1887, W. Avery & Son, an English needle manufacturer, produced a series of figural brass needlecases. The company dominated the market so much that all similar brass Victorian needlecases became known as "Averys." This handpainted rosewood needlecase is a good example. #antiques #needlecases #sewingneedles #WaveryandSon #England #ivory #bone #silver #brass #wood #Victorian
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On this snowy, winter's day, a cup of hot chocolate warms the body and soul. After the conquistadores brought chocolate back to Europe from Mexico in the 16th century, it steadily gained popularity. By the mid-17th century, chocolate was well established and sought after by the well-to-do in Italy, France, Germany, and finally England. From the time Spanish explorers brought chocolate back to Europe, people served chocolate hot. Potters created the first commercial chocolate pots of earthenware, but by the early 19th century, porcelain ones began to appear, coinciding with the decrease in the cost of chocolate and its availability to everyone, regardless of their economic status. At the same time the porcelain chocolate pot changed. Since the cocoa made from the cacao bean dissolved in hot water, whipping the chocolate was no longer necessary, so the hole for the molinet—the wooden stirrer—originally placed in the lid of the pot was no longer needed. By the mid- to late 19th century, most porcelain companies produced chocolate pots with solid lids. #antiques #hotchocolate #chocolatepots #Mexico #Europe #pottery
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