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This Day in Aviation History
October 23rd, 1952
First flight of the Hughes XH-17.
 
The Hughes XH-17 "Flying Crane" was the first helicopter project for the helicopter division of Hughes Aircraft. The XH-17, which had a two-bladed main rotor system with a diameter of 134 feet (41 m), was capable of flying at a gross weight of more than 50,000 pounds (23,000 kg).
 
The XH-17 was a heavy-lift rotorcraft that was designed to lift loads in excess of 15 metric tons. To speed construction, parts of the XH-17 were scavenged from other aircraft. The front wheels came from a B-25 Mitchell and the rear wheels from a C-54 Skymaster. The fuel tank was a bomb bay-mounted unit from a B-29 Superfortress. The cockpit was from a Waco CG-15 and the tail rotor from a Sikorsky H-19 was used for yaw control.
 
In the late 1940s, Hughes developed an interest in helicopters. In August 1947, helicopter manufacturer Kellett sold his design for the giant XH-17 Sky Crane to Hughes, who commissioned the development of the XH-17 Flying Crane research vehicle. In 1948, the XH-17 began to take shape. The giant helicopter was tested in Culver City, California over a three-year period beginning in 1952. The XH-17 flew in 1953 at a gross weight in excess of 50,000 pounds (23,000 kg). It still holds the record for flying with the world's largest rotor system. Only one unit was built, since the aircraft was too cumbersome and inefficient to warrant further development....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Hughes XH-17: http://gstv.us/1PB0c48
 
YouTube, Hughes XH-17 Helicopter Newsreels - 1952: http://gstv.us/1PB0t77
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
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#avgeek #Hughes #XH17 #FlyingCrane #experimental #USA #helicopter #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 22nd, 1955
First flight of the Republic F-105 Thunderchief.
 
The Republic F-105 Thunderchief was a supersonic fighter-bomber used by the United States Air Force. The Mach 2 capable F-105 conducted the majority of strike bombing missions during the early years of the Vietnam War; it was the only U.S. aircraft to have been removed from combat due to high loss rates. Originally designed as a single-seat, nuclear-attack aircraft, a two-seat Wild Weasel version was later developed for the specialized Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD) role against surface-to-air missile sites. The F-105 was commonly known as the "Thud" by its crews.
 
As a follow-on to the Mach 1 capable North American F-100 Super Sabre, the F-105 was also armed with missiles and a cannon; however, its design was tailored to high-speed low-altitude penetration carrying a single nuclear weapon internally. First flown in 1955, the Thunderchief entered service in 1958. The F-105 could deliver a greater bomb load than some American heavy bombers of World War II such as the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and Consolidated B-24 Liberator. The F-105 was one of the primary attack aircraft of the Vietnam War; over 20,000 Thunderchief sorties were flown, with 382 aircraft lost including 62 operational (non-combat) losses (out of the 833 produced). Although less agile than smaller MiG fighters, USAF F-105s were credited with 27.5 kills.....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Republic F-105 Thunderchief: http://gstv.us/1PAYMGH
 
YouTube, F 105 Thunderchief: http://gstv.us/1PAYS1e
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/2dHJPpc
 
#avgeek #Republic #F105 #Thunderchief #Thud #military #USA #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 21st, 1947
First flight of the Northrop YB-49, the first jet-powered flying wing to fly in the USA.
 
The Northrop YB-49 was a prototype jet-powered heavy bomber aircraft developed by Northrop Corporation shortly after World War II for service with the U.S. Air Force. The YB-49 featured a flying wing design and was a jet-powered development of the earlier, piston-engined Northrop XB-35 and YB-35. The two YB-49s actually built were both converted YB-35 test aircraft.
 
The YB-49 never entered production, being passed over in favor of the more conventional Convair B-36 piston-driven design. Design work performed in the development of the YB-35 and YB-49 nonetheless proved to be valuable to Northrop decades later in the eventual development of the B-2 stealth bomber, which entered service in the early 1990s....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Northrop YB-49: http://gstv.us/1MFEyd3
 
YouTube, Northrop YB-49 "Flying Wing" - Taxing, Take Off & Flight Operations (1947): http://gstv.us/1MFEzO8
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/2eypEaI
 
#avgeek #Northrop #YB49 #military #experimental #USA #FlyingWing #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 20th, 1948
First flight of the McDonnell XF-88 Voodoo.
 
The McDonnell XF-88 Voodoo was a long-range, twin-engine jet fighter aircraft with swept wings designed for the United States Air Force. Although it never entered service, its design was adapted for the subsequent supersonic F-101 Voodoo.
 
The XF-88 originated from a 1946 United States Army Air Forces requirement for a long-range "penetration fighter" to escort bombers to their targets. It was to be essentially a jet-powered replacement for the wartime North American P-51 Mustang that had escorted Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers over Germany. It was to have a combat radius of 900 mi (1,450 km) and high performance. McDonnell began work on the aircraft, dubbed Model 36, on 1 April 1946. On 20 June the company was given a contract for two prototypes designated XP-88. Dave Lewis was Chief of Aerodynamics on this project.
 
The initial design was intended to have straight wings and a V-shaped tail but wind tunnel tests indicated aerodynamic problems that led to a conventional tailplane being substituted and the wings being swept. The USAAF confirmed the order for the two prototypes on 14 February 1947, while a change in designation schemes lead to the unflown prototypes being re-designated XF-88 on 1 July 1948, with the type gaining the nickname "Voodoo".....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, McDonnell XF-88 Voodoo: http://gstv.us/1MFzMfI
 
YouTube, McDonnell's XF-88 Long Range Fighter: http://gstv.us/1MFzQft
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/1MFAhqb
 
#avgeek #McDonnell #XF88 #Voodoo #Military #USA #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 19th, 1901
 Alberto Santos-Dumont flies his Number 6 dirigible around the Eiffel Tower.
 
On 19 October 1901, after several more attempts, Santos-Dumont succeeded in making the return flight. Immediately after he reached Saint-Cloud, a controversy broke out regarding the precise timing of the flight: although he had reached his destination in under 30 minutes there had been a delay of over a minute before his mooring line was picked up. However a satisfactory compromise was reached, and Santos Dumont was eventually given the prize, which he announced would be given to the poor of Paris. An additional 125,000 francs along with a gold medal was voted to him by the government of his native Brazil....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Alberto Santos-Dumont: http://gstv.us/1MFxmxD
 
YouTube, Wings of Madness -SANTOS DUMONT: http://gstv.us/1MFxpcM
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/1MFxrBz
 
#avgeek #Alberto #SantosDumont #Dirigible #EiffelTower #Paris #France #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 18th, 1979
First flight of the McDonnell Douglas MD-80.
 
The McDonnell Douglas MD-80 is a family of twin-engine, short- to medium-range, single-aisle commercial jet airliners. The MD-80 series was lengthened and updated from the DC-9. The airliner family can seat from 130 to 172 passengers depending on variant and seating configuration.
 
The MD-80 series was introduced into commercial service on October 10, 1980 by Swissair. The series includes the MD-81, MD-82, MD-83, MD-87, and MD-88. These all have the same fuselage length except the shortened MD-87. The MD-80 series was followed into service in modified form by the MD-90 in 1995 and the MD-95/Boeing 717 in 1999....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, McDonnell Douglas MD-80: http://gstv.us/1Rdv5cb
 
YouTube, McDonnell Douglas MD-80 Promo Film - 1983: http://gstv.us/1Rdv5sL
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/1Rdv5Jp
 
#avgeek #McDonnell #Douglas #MD80 #airliner #USA #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 17th, 1922
A Vought VE-7 Bluebird, piloted by Lt. Virgil Griffin, performs the inaugural takeoff from the USS Langley.
 
As the first American aircraft carrier, Langley was the scene of several seminal events in U. S. naval aviation. On 17 October 1922, Lt. Virgil C. Griffin piloted the first plane—a Vought VE-7—launched from her decks. Though this was not the first time an airplane had taken off from a ship, and though Langley was not the first ship with an installed flight deck, this one launching was of monumental importance to the modern U.S. Navy. The era of the aircraft carrier was born introducing into the navy what was to become the vanguard of its forces in the future. With Langley underway nine days later, Lieutenant Commander Godfrey de Courcelles Chevalier made the first landing in an Aeromarine 39B. On 18 November, Commander Whiting was the first aviator to be catapulted from a carrier's deck.....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, USS Langley (CV-1): http://gstv.us/1jrkuQD
 
YouTube, The first takeoff and the first landing of airplanes on the U.S. Navy's first Aircraft Carrier: http://gstv.us/1jrkz6X
 
Further Reading:
http://gstv.us/2xH8fe1
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/2xH8fe1
 
#avgeek #Vought #VE7 #Bluebird #LtVergilGriffin #USS #Langley #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 16th, 1937
First flight of the Short Sunderland.
 
The Short S.25 Sunderland was a British flying boat patrol bomber developed for the Royal Air Force (RAF) by Short Brothers. It took its service name from the town (latterly, city) and port of Sunderland in northeast England.
 
Based in part upon the S.23 Empire flying boat, the flagship of Imperial Airways, the S.25 was extensively re-engineered for military service. It was one of the most powerful and widely used flying boats throughout the Second World War, and was involved in countering the threat posed by German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic. RAF Sunderlands also saw service throughout the Korean War and continued in service until 1959. It also took part in the Berlin airlift. Sunderlands remained in service with the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) until 1967.
 
Sunderlands converted for civil use, known as Short Sandringhams, continued in airline operation until 1974. A single airworthy example remains on display in Florida at Fantasy of Flight.....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Short Sunderland: http://gstv.us/1LjGzY4
 
YouTube, Sunderland Flying Boat (1940-1949): http://gstv.us/1LjGAeI
 
YouTube, Short Sunderland MR5: http://gstv.us/1LjGzat
 
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Photo from: http://gstv.us/2dscSwJ
 
#avgeek #Short #Sunderland #airliner #military #British #FlyingBoat #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 15th, 1952
First flight of the Douglas X-3 Stiletto.
 
The Douglas X-3 Stiletto was a 1950s United States experimental jet aircraft with a slender fuselage and a long tapered nose, manufactured by the Douglas Aircraft Company. Its primary mission was to investigate the design features of an aircraft suitable for sustained supersonic speeds, which included the first use of titanium in major airframe components. Douglas designed the X-3 with the goal of a maximum speed of approximately 2,000 m.p.h, but it was, however, seriously underpowered for this purpose and could not even exceed Mach 1 in level flight. Although the research aircraft was a disappointment, Lockheed designers used data from the X-3 tests for the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter which used a similar trapezoidal wing design in a successful Mach number 2 fighter....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Douglas X-3 Stiletto: http://gstv.us/1LMy3X8
 
YouTube, Douglas X-3 Stiletto: http://gstv.us/1LMypwS
 
YouTube, Douglas X-3 Stiletto: 1950s U.S. Experimental Jet Aircraft: http://gstv.us/1LMyuAG
 
YouTube, Aircraft, USA: Experimental X-3 Stiletto 250199-01: http://gstv.us/1LMyy3p
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/2efhP9G
 
#avgeek #Douglas #X3 #Stiletto #experimental #USA #aviation #history #fb
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This Day in Aviation History
October 14th, 1938
First flight of the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk.
 
The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk was an American single-engined, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground-attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk which reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service. The Warhawk was used by most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in frontline service until the end of the war. It was the third most-produced American fighter, after the P-51 and P-47; by November 1944, when production of the P-40 ceased, 13,738 had been built, all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation's main production facilities at Buffalo, New York.
 
P-40 Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps adopted for all models, making it the official name in the United States for all P-40s. The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk for models equivalent to the P-40B and P-40C, and the name Kittyhawk for models equivalent to the P-40D and all later variants.
 
P-40s first saw combat with the British Commonwealth squadrons of the Desert Air Force in the Middle East and North African campaigns, during June 1941. No. 112 Squadron Royal Air Force, was among the first to operate Tomahawks in North Africa and the unit was the first Allied military aviation unit to feature the "shark mouth" logo, copying similar markings on some Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 110 twin-engine fighters....
 
Source:
Wikipedia, Curtiss P-40 Warhawk: http://gstv.us/1PesP6Q
 
YouTube, P-40, Warbirds of WWII: http://gstv.us/1GGoT77
 
Please consider supporting Gazing Skyward TV by using our affiliate links when shopping online and becoming a Patron on Patreon. http://gazingskywardtv.com/donate/
 
Photo from: http://gstv.us/2ebYKFv
 
#avgeek #Curtiss #P40 #Warhawk #military #ww2 #USA #FlyingTigers #aviation #history #fb
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