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Ideas and thought experiments about the world that may come

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Mark Traphagen

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Noticing that Apple's predictive ability of text entry autosuggest has improved vastly in iOS 10.

Example: Today I was typing "multiple language versions of your" and one of the autosuggests for the next word was "site," which is exactly what I wanted. Appears this was because that phrase was in the post I was sharing at the time, confirmed by when I typed it in this post "site" 'did not come up.

Looks like Apple has included the context of words on the page for autosuggest, which is awesome. 
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Steve Dowe's profile photoNicole Anderson's profile photo
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Thanks p,
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Mark Traphagen

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This is new from AT&T, and I think it's a great idea: a custom video explanation of my bill.

Along with my first wireless cell service bill, @AT&T sent me a 3 minute, customized video that walked me through a line-by-line explanation of the charges on my bill.

Brilliant use of video and automation, and much easier to follow than all the fine print on the printed statement. I'm betting this significantly cuts down on customer service calls.
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Elmer Boutin's profile photo
 
It was cool the first couple of times, and very helpful. 6 months after switching to AT&T, I'd rather just have a note indicating how much the bill is so that if it looks off, I can log in and check. 
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Mark Traphagen

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Paralyzed man becomes first person to “feel” sensations through a prosthetic hand connected to his brain http://flip.it/J9T6o
A 28-year-old paralyzed man became the first person to gain a sense of touch with a prosthetic hand. It was developed by DARPA's Revolutionizing Prosthetics program.
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Mark Traphagen

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Via +Yifat Cohen
 
The emotional experience of connectedness between friends in digital environments shows that we experience the same sense of bonding through video chat as we do from in person communication.

The Department of Psychology, University of California researched The effects of text, audio, video, and in-person communication on bonding between friends and found that "Compared with other participants, those who used video chat more frequently reported greater bonding with friends through video chat in our study".

Those who HIRL already experienced and can attest to the truth of this study (read it here - http://www.cyberpsychology.eu/view.php?cisloclanku=2013071101), which is why I love Hangouts so :)

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#research   #socialmedia   #humanconnection  
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Yifat Cohen's profile photoMark Traphagen's profile photo
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Yes +Yifat Cohen. I love it when data overturns our assumptions!
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Mark Traphagen

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A great post from +David Amerland that explains the value many of us have found on Google+, that works in spite of (and maybe because of?) the fact that our "friends and family aren't here."
 
Why I am on G+ so much

I had to explain to a corporate colleague, yesterday, why I spend so much time and energy on G+ engaging and interacting, putting up original content (when my website should be really benefiting from it) and sharing a lot of original information and insights (which should logically be kept for my books which bring me money.) 

It was a fair question which became the initiation point for a long discussion into which were also drawn his line manager and the company's Corporate Communications expert. 

I had to delve deep into my own motivations in order to actually make sense to people who don't use G+ and see social networks only as a marketing tool. As the discussion evolved I used their Whiteboard to sketch a few connections and relationships. I began to explain that there is a high level or reciprocity within G+ that is not evidenced in Twitter or even Facebook despite the fact that the latter is mostly close friends and family.

Once I started to look at it through the prism of Trust (which is the subject of an upcoming book which has me buried in research as well as writing) things began to fall into place.

What's more, the usual 'soft' platitudes of making friends with people you have never met and actually trusting them, suddenly began to make more sense.

Everything here is a contract of sorts, running on Transactional Trust and governed by the Reciprocity Response (https://goo.gl/mPAJWc). Transactional Trust, in turn, is made up of three other different types of trust, each of which has its own key points.

Not only does this help all of us interact in ways which provide mutual gains but it allows us to interact with different people, differently, calculate 'trust' differently for everyone and differently for each situation while still understanding that it is trust we use. 

Trust is the key ingredient in establishing and strengthening connections between individuals which then begin to figure into such other concepts as identity, self-worth and the establishment of one's presence. In semantic search trust is the key value ascribed in the interaction and engagement between Entities. 

When I got home my Whiteboard doodle became the diagram you see below. Have one awesome Saturday. :) 
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Mike Biros's profile photoHayo Jongbloed's profile photo
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Love it!
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Mark Traphagen

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Tim Cook Just Nailed the Problem with Virtual Reality | Vanity Fair

Cook thinks the winning VR of the future will look more like Google Glass than Oculus. 
Why augmented reality like Google Glass, not Oculus, is the future.
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William Johnston's profile photoLaJuan Hughes's profile photo
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+William Johnston there're some good thing happening.
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Mark Traphagen

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Facebook's M Artificial Intelligence Personal Assistant Still Has a Long Way to Go
 
While M (now being tested with a small pool of Facebook users) shows a lot of promise for the future, it is still highly dependent on a group of human trainers, and will be for a while.
 
"I’m very comfortable saying that if we check in a year from now, despite the fact that Facebook and M have the capability of processing hundreds of thousands of requests, they will not have a program that’s on par with a real concierge, because of the complexity of it and the open-endedness of it, and the nuances."
 
HT +Glenn Gabe
Facebook's David Marcus says M is already a lot more than just people pretending to be robots.
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I've got it... it's like Zeno's Paradox in reverse. You'll like this, I think: Google and Apple are starting from the proposition that theirs is a true learning machine, and they've got the data to bolster it. Hundreds of millions of Apple devices, billions of Androids and other devices which support Google Voice Search & Actions to varying degrees. Like a true Learning Machine, though, individual failure is without a net: it gives the answer or it doesn't. If enough querents ask, or if special groups of testers deem this important, then corrections and improvements when possible are made... but crucially, no human is inside the box, ever.

Facebook begins from the proposition of sort of admitting being way behind. Credit where credit is due... they're being honest. But instead of building out and promoting a product hundreds of millions to billions of people will help train, they've shoved a box labeled Artificial Assistant inside a box labeled Messenger and stuffed people into that box inside the box to fix every individual failure of the system... to train it.

So, for every little case they identify and fix, Apple and Google's systems are looking at a broad swath of queries whose quality of answers ranged from perfect to could be better to nowhere close, targeting the most critical ones, and thereby pulling farther ahead. So for every step Facebook takes, the competition takes several dozen in the same space of time... meaning there is no way to catch up that way.

Or as Bart Simpson put it, "So we're going to catch up by going slower? Cukoo!"
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Mark Traphagen

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Four future space technologies that will change the world in your lifetime http://flip.it/41QpL
From ending natural disasters, to flying to Sydney in an hour, scientists are working on future technologies to solve some of humanity's biggest challenges
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Tadeusz Szewczyk (Tad Chef)'s profile photo
 
Some of these ideas are astounding, other are pretty backwards, hypersonic planes are a huge pollutant. Already  current planes are one of the main emittors of greenhouse gases.

Earth is even more vulnerable in the stratosphere or generally high altitudes where such planes would fly.

"When was the first recorded hypersonic flight?
The V-2 rocket, first used in World War II by Nazi Germany" explains how such megalomaniac ideas of progress appear.

I wish the Telegraph would provide more balanced journalistic coverage not just hail the technical future like in the fifties.
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Mark Traphagen

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+Mike Elgan shows us that the future we live in today is not only different from that envisioned a century ago, it is often better. 
In the first half of the 20th Century, a wide range of futurists, science fiction writers and others predicted what life would be like in the Year 2000 and beyond. I'm here to tell you that future has arrived -- and it's better than envisioned.
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Mark Traphagen

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From Human to Amabot at Amazon

Some deep reflection by +Gideon Rosenblatt on the implications of machine learning for both blue and white collar workers at mega-companies like Amazon.
When we relegate human labor to the work machines haven't yet learned, the results can be dehumanizing.
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Gideon Rosenblatt's profile photo
 
Thanks for sharing this piece, +Mark Traphagen. Writing this piece is driving me to dig a little deeper into Basic Income. It's also gotten me more focused on what often goes by the tag #futureofwork  here and on Twitter. I'm now on the lookout for sharp people thinking about these issues.  
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