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The Dogs Trust launched a new street art campaign on Wood Street in Cardiff

WalesOnline: NEWS
Rachel Cable @Rachel Cable7
Today in Roath #Cardiff #graffiti #streetart #CF24
16:12 - 9 Mar 2016
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Sam said the mixed reaction to street art was interesting but that some people’s negative views wouldn’t stop him from painting.
“Some people like to complain that street art isn’t in line with the Victorian architecture of certain areas in Cardiff,” the 29-year-old said.
“But this was a plain white wall, and the owner asked me to do it, so why not create something on it?
“I find older people are very inquisitive about my work and the students living in this house at the moment seem to think it’s cool.”
Read more: 33 pictures of graffiti in Cardiff that prove the whole city is a work of art
Sam, who started this particular project on Monday, said larger wall murals tend to take less time than a smaller painting as they require less detail and more freedom.
Lucy, 19, a resident of Roath, said she liked and supported the work of street artists.
“I love street art because it adds so much character to what would otherwise be another standard looking street or public space,” she said.
“It’s also a nice surprise when you turn a corner and spot a piece of art.”
Peter, also from Roath, said: “I can understand if some older people don’t like it because a lot of it is quite modern but it’s art and it’s not affecting anyone so it’s there for people to enjoy.”
More: Artists have painted new street art on the Millennium Boardwalk in Cardiff to mark International Women's Day

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554Do
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A colourful example of street art, spotted near the Millennium Stadium
MILLIE THWAITES
18:00, 10 MAR 2016
UPDATED18:08, 10 MAR 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

All it takes is a stroll around Cardiff to see it’s a hub of creativity, covered in unique street art.
And this mural on Inverness Place in Roath is the latest in a long line which is being designed by Cardiff-based artist Sam, who goes by the artist alias Colour Doomed.
The artist and curator, who is one of the organisers of street art festival Empty Walls, has been decorating the streets of Cardiff with his art for nine years.
His latest wall mural covers the side wall of his friend’s house on Inverness Place.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554st piece of street art in Cardiff?
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The Gareth Bale mural in Whitchurch, Cardiff
WalesOnline: NEWS
Rachel Cable @Rachel Cable7
Today in Roath #Cardiff #graffiti #streetart #CF24
16:12 - 9 Mar 2016
Twitter Ads information and privacy
Sam said the mixed reaction to street art was interesting but that some people’s negative views wouldn’t stop him from painting.
“Some people like to complain that street art isn’t in line with the Victorian architecture of certain areas in Cardiff,” the 29-year-old said.
“But this was a plain white wall, and the owner asked me to do it, so why not create something on it?
“I find older people are very inquisitive about my work and the students living in this house at the moment seem to think it’s cool.”
Read more: 33 pictures of graffiti in Cardiff that prove the whole city is a work of art
Sam, who started this particular project on Monday, said larger wall murals tend to take less time than a smaller painting as they require less detail and more freedom.
Lucy, 19, a resident of Roath, said she liked and supported the work of street artists.
“I love street art because it adds so much character to what would otherwise be another standard looking street or public space,” she said.
“It’s also a nice surprise when you turn a corner and spot a piece of art.”
Peter, also from Roath, said: “I can understand if some older people don’t like it because a lot of it is quite modern but it’s art and it’s not affecting anyone so it’s there for people to enjoy.”
More: Artists have painted new street art on the Millennium Boardwalk in Cardiff to mark International Women's Day

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554
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This brilliant new street art has appeared on the side of a house in Cardiff
This new work of street art has appeared on a house in Cardiff but not everyone is happy about it

Sam, who goes by his artist alias of Colour Doomed, started this wall mural on the side of a house in Roath
MILLIE THWAITES
18:00, 10 MAR 2016
UPDATED18:08, 10 MAR 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

All it takes is a stroll around Cardiff to see it’s a hub of creativity, covered in unique street art.
And this mural on Inverness Place in Roath is the latest in a long line which is being designed by Cardiff-based artist Sam, who goes by the artist alias Colour Doomed.
The artist and curator, who is one of the organisers of street art festival Empty Walls, has been decorating the streets of Cardiff with his art for nine years.
His latest wall mural covers the side wall of his friend’s house on Inverness Place.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554
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“Graffiti Artist Bryce Davies at work
Meet the man behind some of Cardiff's most eye-catching street art
It is not long since graffiti was seen as uniquely the preserve of vandals and miscreants but street artist Bryce Davies is changing that, one wall at a time
RUTH MOSALSKI
15:22, 28 AUG 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

Some of Bryce's work
A work he painted on a boys’ club in his home city Bristol, of two lovers checking their mobile phones over each other’s shoulder, was sold for £400,000 and saved the club. Just last week, an MP called for a public inquiry into the removal of a mural in Cheltenham satirising government surveillance.
The Spy Booth work appeared overnight in April 2014 on the wall of a house in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, about three miles from the headquarters of Britain’s surveillance agency, GCHQ.
From walls to vans
On Saturday, pictures were shared on social media showing the wall stripped back to its brickwork.
Alex Chalk, the Conservative MP for the town, described the possible loss of the work as “absolutely shocking”. There have not always been Conservative MPs expressing outrage when street art is lost – and not all artists’ work is as protected as Banksy’s.
A stunning image of an owl by Bryce on the corner of Park Street in Cardiff city centre was painted over by a charity advert that was crude in comparison.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/meet-man-behind-cardiffs-most-11810674
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“Graffiti Artist Bryce Davies at work
Meet the man behind some of Cardiff's most eye-catching street art
It is not long since graffiti was seen as uniquely the preserve of vandals and miscreants but street artist Bryce Davies is changing that, one wall at a time
RUTH MOSALSKI
15:22, 28 AUG 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

It's not just walls
Bryce said the work had been inspired by the Mabinogion tale of Blodeuwedd, who gets turned into an owl. He has since painted an entirely new bit of street art on the wall, depicting a fire-breathing red dragon.
Croeso i’r Ffwrnais (“Welcome to the Furnace”) is one of Bryce’s most recognisable pieces.
On the wall on Park Street, it’s seen by many fans heading to the Principality Stadium.
When it came to creating the dragon, the background was the first step. He then sketched an outline in spray paint, and built up the image using layers and detailed techniques.
'Shine or a pop'
“You start with a background and then work forward. I work with deeper colours first and the last thing to go on is to give it a shine or a pop.
“Everything we do is dependant on scale so it looks a lot different. There’s a lot of crossing the road and taking a step back. Sometimes, it’s a case of taking photographs but looking at it through a screen can be helpful.”
It’s taken time to get to get to the required level of confidence and skill.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/meet-man-behind-cardiffs-most-11810674
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“Graffiti Artist Bryce Davies at work
Meet the man behind some of Cardiff's most eye-catching street art
It is not long since graffiti was seen as uniquely the preserve of vandals and miscreants but street artist Bryce Davies is changing that, one wall at a time
RUTH MOSALSKI
15:22, 28 AUG 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

An epic demonstration of his skills
Bryce started experimenting with graffiti as a teenager. He admits he wasn’t interested in school, but the thing he had shown promise in was art.
“I started getting a bit of work here and there and then it grew really naturally.
“Through graffiti I’ve learned about perspective and scaling up characters, backgrounds and landscapes. All of that came through graffiti. It’s made me look at all styles of art, even the ones they tried to teach me in school – sometimes I’m sat researching Old Masters,” he laughs.
“It’s trying to do things that create effects that other people might do.
'I try to be original'
“I might take inspiration but I’ll try and be original with what I paint, that’s the sign of a good graffiti artist.
“I always try to take on new things and new ways of painting. I look at water colours or abstracts and try to incorporate them into a piece that does something different or something new.”
As well as walls, Bryce paints on buildings. He picks either derelict buildings or ones marked for demolition: “I see it as injecting a bit of love into these places. They’re condemned.”
He’s completed historical pieces in the Valleys, including one remarkable work on the subject of the Senghennydd mining disaster.
For that, he worked with a local primary school to come up with ideas for an old railway bridge which spanned the tracks of the old line that used to carry coal from the Universal pit.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/meet-man-behind-cardiffs-most-11810674
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“Graffiti Artist Bryce Davies at work
Meet the man behind some of Cardiff's most eye-catching street artIt is not long since graffiti was seen as uniquely the preserve of vandals and miscreants but street artist Bryce Davies is changing that, one wall at a time
RUTH MOSALSKI
15:22, 28 AUG 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

An image of a piece of street art by Bryce Davies, who works under the name Peaceful Progress
“It benefits two different generations because the young people see the story and think ‘that’s cool’ and the older generation read the message more. I think that’s a useful part of what we do. We have a chance to make a positive statement in a community and over the years I have come to recognise that a lot more, and I suppose that’s part of growing up.”
One thing you won’t see him doing now he’s a married dad-of-two is illegal painting.
Instead, this art is his life and income – he believes it can improve communities and benefit cities.
Bryce says there is a distinction between street art, like Banksy’s work, which features images and appears more like a mural, and traditional griffiti involving huge letters in bright colours.
'There's a lot of styles'
There are murals in Cardiff of everything from dragons to footballers, as well as an entire boardwalk covered in colourful, luminous graffiti.
He explains: “There’s a big divide between graffiti and street art. A lot of what people see on the walls which puts it in a more positive light is street art – graffiti is letter-based freehand.
“Sometimes you can mix with characters but there’s a lot of styles.”
He made art his full-time job 14 years ago. Back then it was graffiti workshops at community centres. Now he admits “it’s a lot more across the board”.
And the age of those taking part is hugely varied.
“That’s the thing about graffiti, it’s quite indiscriminate. I’ll paint with a guy who’s 17 and then someone who is pushing 50 and there’s an equal relationship with both.
“In some parts of the world it is a hierarchy, but at the same time there’s a collaborative approach to graffiti that makes us so open-minded and quite welcoming.”
When it comes to picking where to paint, there is an unwritten etiquette.
As a rule, anything older should be painted over first. Or anything of a lower quality such as random tags or markings.
But when they walk away from a piece they’ve created, artists are well aware they could have invested £100 and two days’ worth of work, only to return and find it covered over.
Bryce’s designs are created in a variety of ways, whether using stencils or computers, but almost always through collaboration. Rarely will one person employ an exclusive technique of their own.
But what next?
“I think it will develop a lot. There’s been a bit of a boom with street art, which has been good, but there’s been a lot of mediocre people starting lately and not doing much of note.
“People want to seem to skip A and B and just get to C. I think what will happen is that we’ll start to weed out the people who are in it for five minutes. But I think the serious artists will carry on.”
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/meet-man-behind-cardiffs-most-11810674
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The scene by the kitchen bay widow at John’s sister house in Swansea, Wales
This scene is what Mom and John’s sister saw when they were sitting in the armchair and relaxing by the kitchen bay widow at John’s sister house in Swansea, Wales. I miss both of them. I wish they were here with us. Life is too short to fight and be unhappy with each other. We will be apart from each other one of these days, sooner or later. Please get along and be happy with each other.
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, October 15, 2017, Swansea, Wales
If you have time please visit my website, the link is: www.ingpeaceproject.com
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The scene by the kitchen bay widow at John’s sister house in Swansea, Wales
This scene is what Mom and John’s sister saw when they were sitting in the armchair and relaxing by the kitchen bay widow at John’s sister house in Swansea, Wales. I miss both of them. I wish they were here with us. Life is too short to fight and be unhappy with each other. We will be apart from each other one of these days, sooner or later. Please get along and be happy with each other.
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, October 15, 2017, Swansea, Wales
If you have time please visit my website, the link is: www.ingpeaceproject.com

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