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Ocellated Emerald (Somatochlora minor) is one of 26 North American species generically labeled Striped Emeralds (Paulson 2009). True to their name, their eyes exhibit the jewel-like emerald coloration. Similarly rare as the mineral, they are "scarce and difficult to find...in rare types of aquatic habitats" (Dunkle 2000). They fly almost constantly making it very difficult for the wildlife photographer to get a sharp photo :-(

Living with Nature In Will County (Illinois) dramatic efforts are taking place conserving the only dragonfly federally listed as endangered, the Hines Emerald (Somatochlora hineana). Read the story from Felix Sarver of The Herald News (https://goo.gl/tJ29Zb). 
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EYES are the theme today for #joinindaily hosted by +Johnny Wills , nothing could be more appropriate than the compound eyes of a female California Darner (Rhionaeschna californica).

Each compound eye contains up to 30,000 individual simple eyes (ommatidia) (Paulson 2009). According to research from Japan summarized by Sarah Griffiiths (https://goo.gl/prkmJs), dragonflies see in ultra HD!
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Folks, interesting science concerning dragonflies...their wings specifically. Hopefully this engineering can be applied to neutralize bacteria for humanities welfare...read the shared post from +Kevin Clift
Dragonfly Wings

We may be able to learn something new about killing bacteria without using our precious antibiotics by looking, closely, and I mean very closely, at the wings of dragonflies. It seems that dragonfly wings remain free of bacteria through some cunning biological nanotechnology, that we may be able to imitate for use on medical surfaces. But we must first be careful that we know precisely how this killing happens, and with which bacteria.

The prevailing wisdom is that tiny nanoscale pillars on the surface of the dragonfly wings simply pierce the thin bacterial cell walls puncturing and deflating the cell, thereby destroying it. New work on one particular type of Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), carried out by Nigerian and Australian researchers using powerful microscopy techniques, however, suggests that first there is a stage where the bacterial cell glues itself to a nanopillar using Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPSs) as it would to a normal surface, but then unlike on other surfaces, can't move without ripping itself apart.

Once the bacteria land on the surface, they are subjected to adhesive forces. These can deform the bacterial membrane, but by themselves, probably do not cause the bacteria to rupture.

Instead, the bacteria are essentially caught in one of those sinister traps of which movie villains are quite fond. If they don't move, the bacteria might survive. However, when they do move, shear forces pull on the EPSs, ripping the membrane apart. This results in a fatal leakage of cellular contents, which causes the cell to deflate like a balloon. (See image below.) Only after the cell is dead do the nanopillars penetrate it.

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More here (article): https://goo.gl/e1EzN1


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Bed of Nails (article): https://goo.gl/Yd3EgD
(Prevailing wisdom)

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Black Silicon (Wikip): https://goo.gl/CHBxw7

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EPS (Wikip): https://goo.gl/CGSuPP


New Paper (closed): https://goo.gl/hI3fDq

Image: Courtesy of +Bob Danley
Common Green Darner Wings (Anax junius): https://goo.gl/V0MzXx
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Shades of PINK illustrated with this male Roseate Skimmer (Orthemis ferruginea) for #colouroftheday coordinated by +Heidi Anne Morris
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Today's #joinindaily theme is Must Have Yellow Green & blue in it, qualified with an in-flight shot of Sedge Darner (Aeshna juncea)
Shared with +Johnny Wills
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Immature male Sympetrum , either White-faced or Cherry-faced Meadowhawk. A good example that photographs are sometimes not enough to document/identify plants or animals. That is, at this point in time, we haven't figured out a means of separation. Read Maria Popova of Brain Pickings (https://goo.gl/hDuR71) for a take on evolution of knowledge :-)
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A colorful INSECT is the Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata) found in the most of the eastern U.S. Habitat generally wet areas in/near forested land cover (Paulson 2011). Beaton (2007) writes "not normally numerous" in Georgia at sites where present.
Shared with #joinindaily and +Johnny Wills
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Eight-spotted Skimmer (Libellula forensis) atop knapweed skeleton. This Skimmer is restricted to the American West and extreme southwest Canada (Paulson 2009). Name fits, note eight dark spots on wings :-) The white "pruinosity" (powdery waxy bloom) on the wings and body are a feature of mature individuals (Wikipedia). Interesting as humans mature they lose melanin, i.e. coloration in hair :-)
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Female Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) perched cooperatively in forest opening. This dragonfly is nearly 2 inches long (Paulson 2009) and perches in open, easy to see if looking. Dan Jackson of Minnesota is a wildlife watcher extraordinaire listing both birds and dragonflies. Read his story (https://goo.gl/yhMg5t) from Winona Daily News. Be like Dan :-)
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In mature plumage a Black Meadowhawk (Sympetrum danae) is greater than 70% BLACK. Shared with #joinindaily and +Johnny Wills
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