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For developing nations, aquaculture is often regarded as an opportunity to provide job and food security. As highlighted in a report by WorldFish and FAO focusing on Bangladeshi women working in homestead pond production and shrimp processing factories, aquaculture also has the potential to empower women.

I wrote this story - where it can be read in full - for The Fish Site. The site is open access - no sign-up or pesky paywalls - yippie!

#aquaculture #womeninaquaculture #genderequity #genderroles
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What does Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture* and poultry meal have in common? Together they could make a decent, lower impact fish food. Sounds like a step in the right direction right?

Read the story in full at the Sustainable Aquaculture Magazine. It's open access - no sign up required - hurrah!


*Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) systems farm different species together to create a mini-food-chain. Essentially, the waste from one species becomes food for another.



#aquaculture #seabream #fishfood

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Going Fishing for Squid

This fishing boat is kitted out to catch squid. How can you tell? Check out the rows of lights hanging from the grey bar near the front (bow) of the boat! These fishing boats head out sea at night time and shine their bright lights. Squid then gather around the light in great numbers, making it easier for the fishers to catch their prey.

So why are squid gathering around the lights in the first place?

Actually, we aren’t 100% sure. It might be an evolutionary response; they are attracted to the lights – rather like they would be to bioluminescent animals (which naturally emit their own light) that they would want to eat.

Or it might be because they lights show up their unsuspecting prey. Zooplankton (tiny marine animals) head to the surface to feed at night time. Under the cover of darkness, they are safer from the eyes of squid and other animals that want to eat them. Unfortunately for the zooplankton, the lights from the fishing boat make it easy for the squid to see them! Under this scenario, the squid aren’t attracted to the light as such – more to an easy meal.

Or it could be something else entirely different – isn’t nature wonderfully mysterious!

Image credit: Samantha Andrews

#fishing #fisheries #ocean #sea #Japan #Hakodate #Squid #marinelife #sealife #animals #nature #invertebrates
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Chile’s salmon aquaculture benefits from fallowing – and so too could trout farmers

In Chilean salmonid farmers’ worst nightmares, Piscirickettsia salmonis must be a regular feature. This bacterium causes Salmon Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a highly infectious disease whose symptoms include haemorrhaging, lesions, ulcers, anorexia, and many cases death.

SRS is an epidemic in Chile, costing the salmon aquaculture industry over US $300 million each year. Vaccines have been largely ineffective and antibiotics have given mixed results. Mandatory three-month fallowing, on the other hand, seems to routinely reduce the chance of reinfection.

The underlying principle behind fallowing is fairly straightforward. Net-pen systems commonly used by finfish farmers allow pathogens to spread into the wider environment. Some are carried away by currents, some remain suspended in the water column or on the seafloor under and near the farm. In all cases, they wait for a new host to come close enough for reinfection. Fortunately for the fish, and the farmer, pathogens can’t survive forever without a host – which is where fallowing comes in. Take the hosts away and all the equipment out of the water for disinfection, and the odds of contagion rapidly drop…



This article was written for The Fish Site – please continue to read the article on the link below (and yes, I know the link shows a different title - but I can't change it here)

Feel free to comment!

#Aquaculture #Salmon #SRS #RainbowTrout #Trout #FishFarm
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Controlling the uncontrollable? Sea lice in salmon aquaculture

I put together an article for The Sustainable Food Trust looking at one of the most controversial issues and hard to solve problems facing salmon aquaculture - sea lice infestations.

The article is open access - take a look and feel free to comment here or on the website itself.

#aquaculture #salmon #sealice
Sustainable Food Trust
Sustainable Food Trust
sustainablefoodtrust.org
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Addressing Knowledge Gaps for Lumpfish Production

The use of cleaner fish such as lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) to control sea lice in aquaculture is rapidly emerging as an effective alternative to medicinal treatments. However lumpfish are a relatively new species to aquaculture and as a result, there still exists a number of knowledge gaps that need to be filled in order to develop sustainable lumpfish production.

At this years Aquaculture Canada and Cold Harvest 2016 Conference, Paul Howes, aquaculture technical manager at Swansea University’s Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research (CSAR) explained some of the research being done to bring lumpfish as a sea lice control into reality. I wrote about his talk for The Fish Site. Have a read, and feel free to add any comments

#Aquaculture   #sealice   #lumpfish   #biocontrol  
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Improving Aquaculture Feed Sustainability with Genomics

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to attend the Aquaculture Canada and Coldwater Harvest 2016 Conference held in Newfoundland. Here is another article I wrote for The Fish Site covering just one of of the great talks that went on at the conference

In terms of sustainability, fish feed remains one of the finfish aquaculture industry’s greatest challenges. To alleviate pressure on wild stocks, there is a growing need for aquaculture to reduce – and ideally eliminate – fish meal and fish oil from carnivorous fish feeds


#Aquaculture   #sustainability   #fish   #fishfeed   #genomics  
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Diversification Key for Canadian Aquaculture

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to attend the Aquaculture Canada and Coldwater Harvest 2016 Conference held in Newfoundland. Here is an article I wrote covering just one of of the great talks that went on at the conference for The Fish Site

"If Atlantic Canada wants to have a strong aquaculture industry, then they must not “put all [their] eggs into one salmon basket”. This was the key message from Professor Thierry Chopin, University of New Brunswick, when he presented at the Aquaculture Canada and Coldwater Harvest 2016 Conference held in St John’s, Newfoundland, this month


#Aquaculture   #Salmon   #SalmonFarms   #Canada  
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Post-harvest Fisheries Losses

Fishing incurs costs from many different aspects – the vessel itself, fuel, fishing equipment, crew, licences, and so forth. Making sure every bit of a catch counts as income is essential – especially where fishers are running on tight margins. Whilst some may focus on improving catch efficiencies, losses can occur throughout the supply-chain. These ‘post-harvest losses’ are most prevalent in small-scale fisheries, in less wealthy regions of the World. Post-harvest losses aren’t just an economic concern, but also one from the perspective of food security. 

In this article I wrote for The Fish Site, I give a brief overview as to some of the problems of Post Harvest Losses for fisheries.  The article is open-access (no need for sign-ups!) so feel free to take a peak and comment.

There will be a couple more articles over the next month looking at some specific solutions to this issue for small-scale fisheries.

#smallscalefisheries   #postharvestlosses   #fishing   #fisheries   #marinescience  
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FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries

Twenty years ago the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) set about to produce a single, consistent, non-mandatory set of guidelines for the management and development of fisheries, whilst achieving conservation objectives.

In this open access article I wrote for The Fish Site, I briefly explain what 'The Code' is, and how it has (and hasn't) been used to improve fisheries management around the world. 
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