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The power of visuals.

""This tracker has a huge impact on my everyday life – it's a great way to keep track on how I am feeling during the week," she said. She hopes the tracker will help her in the long run: "It really helps you look back on your past years wondering how you felt through those long days you had at school or at work or just in life in general.""

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A lot of applicable insights to the experience of art-making, which also engages and reconnects the full bodily senses with its tactility and aromas, viscosities and granularities, vibrancies and subtleties, sweeping gestures and meditative strokes, of breaking and joining, of riot and rhapsody, of peace and containment...

"Analog, although more cumbersome and costly than its digital equivalents, provides a richness of experience that is unparalleled with anything delivered through a screen. People are buying books because a book engages nearly all of their senses, from the smell of the paper and glue to the sight of the cover design and weight of the pages read, the sound of those sheets turning, and even the subtle taste of the ink on your fingertips. A book can be bought and sold, given and received, and displayed on a shelf for anyone to see. It can start conversations and cultivate romances."

#arttherapy

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“I first made art to get some things out of my body. Then I made it for the approval I overlooked growing up. Then I made it to accept myself. Then I made it because folks were reporting a healing that was happenin'."

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"As critically conscious art therapists, we uphold our ethical commitment to, “understand the nature of social diversity and oppression,” (Principle 7.4) not in order to be in compliance with a formal written code determined by an outside governing body, but rather we uphold this commitment because we are intimate witnesses to and direct targets of violence. We uphold this commitment as a means of solidarity with those we serve and as a personal strategy for survival. We are deeply invested in fighting back against the systems that seek to eradicate us and refuse to support an organization that chooses public promotion and visibility over the cause of justice."

- https://arttherapy4socialjustice.wordpress.com

#AATA2017
#arttherapy
#resist
#karenpenceisnotarttherapy
#wearearttherapy
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'“The arts are a way of forming, shaping and holding in front of your eyes something you feel internally,” says Phil George, chair of Arts Council Wales, who last November called on the government to fund the arts to improve health. “It’s about storytelling,” he says. “It helps people develop a narrative of their lives and relate to their own experience in a new way. I’m convinced from the evidence that investment in the arts for health would pay off. It would be beneficial, not just in terms of wellbeing, but in terms of the pressures and costs that mental illness puts on the system.”'

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'There was a series of sketches I did from when my father was passing away. When I would be spending time with him, as he was dying, I didn't know what else to do with myself but draw. As the cancer reached his brain and he became less and less communicative, I would sit there and draw him because he was what I was thinking on, and I didn't know what else to do. The paper gave a place for my helplessness to exist in a way that was less frightening to me. As for sharing them publicly I did it because—again—that's just what I do. I know it can sound cliche for artists to say, but my art truly is my life...it is all I feel I should be doing and it documents my life, be it through things I experience first hand, or things I learn about that effect me. It is my better expressed side and their is no editing process because you can't edit life. I approach my pieces honestly, and have at times put things in them even I am not too comfortable with. But in the end, if I believe I am being honest, and compassionate, then I feel no shame in putting up even difficult things to look at and feel no shame in earning the simple living I do.'

#arttherapy
#palliative #death #dying #grief #loss

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Interesting links can be made to tactile, haptic art materials and repairing of attachment bonds.

'Squishies are not a replacement for human affection. But because of their adorable looks and pillowy texture, they are remarkably reassuring. This summer, as kids went off to camp, squishies were “being packed in the trunk and then asked for on visiting day,” Judy Ishayik, owner of New York City’s Mary Arnold Toys, tells New York Magazine. This is telling: Loneliness is an integral part of the camp experience. For many children, it’s their first experience away from home, barring the occasional sleepover or solo visit to a grandparent’s house. Squishies combine the comfort and familiarity of a stuffed animal—that little piece of home in a new place—with the built-in activity and cool factor of a fidget spinner.'

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'This is what it's like to turn a suicide note into a paper airplane.'

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'Oxygen, food, heartbeats—we don’t often think of music as a conduit to these primal functions. The idea of music as something human bodies do has fallen to the margins as arts programs disappear from schools nationwide, while songs often arrive to us as tick birds riding discreetly on the backs of larger cultural phenomena—movies, video games, television, phones.

'So there is something particularly profound about the idea that music could teach a newborn baby how to breathe, how to eat, how to exist. Music therapy, a growing field still in its nascence in the U.S., is one of the last remaining sanctums in the world where music serves this purpose, connecting us to the most basic human truths.'

#artstherapy
#musictherapy
#trauma

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'“Getting old,” he writes in ​Becoming Myself, “is giving up one damn thing after another.”'

'For all the morbidity of existential psychotherapy, it is deeply life-affirming. Change is always possible. Intimacy can be freeing. Existence is precious. “I hate the idea of leaving this world, this wonderful life,” Yalom said, praising a metaphor devised by the scientist Richard Dawkins to illustrate the fleeting nature of existence. Imagine that the present moment is a spotlight moving its way across a ruler that shows the billions of years the universe has been around. Everything to the left of the area lit by the spotlight is over; to the right is the uncertain future. The chances of us being in the spotlight at this particular moment—of being alive—are minuscule. And yet here we are.'
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