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Virtually anything is possible to accomplish, there is a technological way that allows you to achieve your wildest dreams
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Google launches Poly, a 3D object library for ARCore, ARKit, and other VR development platforms
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Remote controlled TIE fighter with an onboard camera, I've gotta get myself one of these. Source with some awesome videos: http://m.imgur.com/gallery/IcDEU
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IBM scientists say radical new ‘in-memory’ computing architecture will make computers 200 times faster
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Astronaut Chris Hadfield​ recounts that time when the computer system aboard the International Space Station failed and they lost contact with Earth and their safety systems shut down. It's a pretty crazy story...

CHRIS HADFIELD: Fairly early on when I was on the space station in this half-year trip up there...we were doing a major computer upgrade. It had been tested on the ground. And computers run the space station. It's not run by switches and knobs, it's run by computers and software. And we were doing a major upgrade, and it had been tested left, right and center and all the simulators on the ground and we were all ready for it and, you know, Houston said it was in our plans and everything. Here we go. OK, three, two, one (mimicking a computer shutting down) and everything quit. And the fans were shutting off and we couldn't communicate with the ground and all the software locked up and nothing was working. And suddenly, we were really helpless because a lot of the safety of the space station is controlled by what we would react to on the computer. A lot of the insight we have, whether there's smoke somewhere or whether something is malfunctioning is told to us by the computers and we had a full lockup. And it's not just your laptop quitting and not getting to your email for a minute, it's the actual control of the whole spaceship. So not a shining moment for us as a crew. But we'd been trained for it.

And so we ran around the ship, checking to see the status of everything. We became sort of the canaries in the mine of knowing that our smoke detectors wouldn't work and so racing around to make sure that seeing if there's smoke somewhere. We were coming up across the Pacific and about across South America, so I got on the HAM radio - the amateur radio - and tried to talk to people in Brazil. So I'm listening to these guys chattering in Portuguese, which while I'm trying to say hey, I'd like to break in and could you please call Houston so to tell them we can't talk to them anymore and this is what we're doing. But, meanwhile, Tom and Kevin and I - Kevin was the commander of the ship at the time, Kevin Ford - there's a whole backup booting sort of software that's called Mighty Mouse and we dug into Mighty Mouse and we went into the backup procedures. And have - we bring paper procedures up just in case the digital ones let us down.

And we - it was actually a really fun moment for the crew because we trained for this sort of thing. And Kevin the commander was behind us with the procedure. Tom and I were the two guys entering the procedures, checking each other out, you know, to command challenge response type of procedures, checking through it, ticking through it. It took several hours getting ready as we came across Russia. Because when we came over the Russian ground sites we could use the assets in the Russian end of the station just for the straight radio, like a VHF radio, just to talk directly. So we had our big list of questions and Houston got ready, so when we came over Russia there was this high speed communication of trying to tell us what to do next and then we went silent after we crossed over the Sea of Japan, worked again for the whole way around the world try to get, bring all the, nurse them back to life - all the computers back to life. And I think it took two times around the world. But after that we had things fixed, got things back to life, had reverted to the old software and then, of course, the experts on the ground tried to figure out what little glitch had gone wrong. It ended up being, you know, just a small subtle thing but something they could fix and then we could upgrade the system later.

But, you know, we spent decades training for what we're supposed to do up there. We have to be the geek squad, you know, the guys that show up to fix your computer, we are those guys. So fortunately, we could deal with it.

Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=356946578
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Severe vulnerability found in WPA2 Wi-Fi protocol. Patch your devices if you can!
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Nvidia unveils the Pegasus supercomputing platform for fully autonomous cars, delivering over 320 trillion operations per second.
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Google/Alphabet to Deploy it's Project Loon Mesh Network to Restore Cell Service to Puerto Rico. Here's more on the tech: https://x.company/loon/technology/
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Engineers at the University of Washington built a battery-free cell phone.

Here's their paper: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3090090
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As Google celebrates its 19th birthday, here's a look at their first production server in all its gloriousness #HappyBirthdayGoogle
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