Post has shared content
The Concept of Different Learning Styles Is the Most Popular Neuroscience Myth

Fundamentally, all human beings learn in similar ways. The idea that people may learn more or less depending on their own particular visual, auditory or kinesthetic preferences is the most popular and influential myth in neuroscience. It was even called a "neuromyth" by Paul Howard-Jones, a professor of neuroscience and education at Bristol University, in a 2014 paper. A concept characterized by the misunderstanding, misreading or misquoting of scientific facts.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
"Our brain encodes new experiences, but not familiar ones, into memory, and our retrospective judgment of time is based on how many new memories we create over a certain period."
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Circulation to the brains of decapitated pigs has been restored and the reanimated organs kept alive for as long as 36 hours. Between 100 and 200 pig brains were obtained from a slaughterhouse and their circulation restored using a system of pumps, heaters, and bags of artificial blood warmed to body temperature.

"There was no evidence that the disembodied pig brains regained consciousness. However, in what Yale University neuroscientist Nenad Sestan termed a 'mind-boggling' and 'unexpected' result, billions of individual cells in the brains were found to be healthy and capable of normal activity."
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Prosthetic memory system successful in humans

Scientists have demonstrated the successful implementation of a prosthetic system that uses a person's own memory patterns to facilitate the brain's ability to encode and recall memory....In the pilot study, published in today's Journal of Neural Engineering, participants' short-term memory performance showed a 35 to 37 percent improvement over baseline measurements. "This is the first time scientists have been able to identify a patient's own brain cell code or pattern for memory and, in essence, 'write in' that code to make existing memory work better, an important first step in potentially restoring memory loss," said the study's lead author Robert Hampson, Ph.D., professor of physiology/pharmacology and neurology at Wake Forest Baptist.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Dolphins beat humans, chimps at early signs of self-awareness

Using mirror images, researchers found that bottlenose dolphins show signs of self-awareness earlier in life than humans and chimpanzees. Recognizing oneself in a mirror is an indicator of self-awareness. This capacity has been identified only in humans, dolphins, great apes, elephants and magpies, the researchers said in background notes. Studying two young dolphins at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, the investigators assessed how the dolphins interacted with their image in a mirror. One dolphin first showed self-directed behavior indicative of mirror self-recognition at 7 months of age, said one of the study authors, Diana Reiss. She's with Hunter College of the City University of New York. Humans first show self-directed behavior at a mirror between 12 and 15 months of age. This firms up between 18 and 24 months of age. Chimps have exhibited these behaviors at a later age, the researchers noted. The findings "add new layers to our understanding of factors that may contribute to the capacity for [mirror self-recognition] across species and the evolution of intelligence in the animal world," Reiss said in a Hunter College news release.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Total Recall: The Woman Who Can’t Forget

The one thing we do know is rather vague: Memories live in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. After that, the entire question of how memory works is up for grabs. For example, where precisely in the hippocampus (or prefrontal cortex) is my memory of reading Kurt Vonnegut for the first time? If I try to summon that experience, I am likely to wind up with a blur—a half dozen indistinct recollections. And no brain-scan technology will help me bring it into better focus. So when I hear about Price's feats, my mind boggles. From the perspective of evolution, finding a human being with memory that works with the precision of a computer would be like finding someone with bones made of steel. The type of memory system we have—in technical terms, context-dependent rather than location-addressable—has been around for several hundred million years. The existence of a human brain that works completely differently is astronomically unlikely.

Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Chimpanzees learn rock-paper-scissors

Chimpanzees of all ages and all sexes can learn the simple circular relationship between the three different hand signals used in the well-known game rock-paper-scissors. Even though it might take them longer, they are indeed able to learn the game as well as a young child. Jie Gao of Kyoto University in Japan and Peking University in China is lead author of a study in the journal Primates, which is the official journal of the Japan Monkey Centre, and is published by Springer. The research compares the ability of chimpanzees and children to learn the rock-paper-scissors game. Gao's research team wanted to find out whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) can grasp extended patterns. They used the rock-paper-scissors game, a popular children's game in which the hand signal for "paper" always beats "rock", while "rock" trumps "scissors", and "scissors" defeats "paper". The relationship between the signals are non-linear and must be understood within the context of how the pairs are grouped. Learning such transverse patterns requires enhanced mental capacity and it is useful when forming complex relationship networks, solving problems, or updating what you already know about a subject. Seven chimpanzees of different ages and sexes living in the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University were part of the experiment. They sat in a booth housing a computer-based touchscreen and were trained to choose the stronger of two options (based on the rules of the game) they saw on screen. They first learnt the paper-rock sequence, then the rock-scissors one and finally the scissors-paper combination. Once they knew how the pairs fitted together, all the different pairs were randomly presented to them on screen. Five of the seven chimpanzees completed the training after an average of 307 sessions. The findings show that chimpanzees can learn the circular pattern at the heart of the game. However, it took them significantly longer to learn the third scissors-paper pair than it did to grasp the others, which indicates that they had difficulty finalizing the circular nature of the pattern.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content

Post has shared content
Blue Brain team discovers a multi-dimensional universe in brain networks

For most people, it is a stretch of the imagination to understand the world in four dimensions but a new study has discovered structures in the brain with up to eleven dimensions - ground-breaking work that is beginning to reveal the brain's deepest architectural secrets. Using algebraic topology in a way that it has never been used before in neuroscience, a team from the Blue Brain Project has uncovered a universe of multi-dimensional geometrical structures and spaces within the networks of the brain. The research, published today in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, shows that these structures arise when a group of neurons forms a clique: each neuron connects to every other neuron in the group in a very specific way that generates a precise geometric object. The more neurons there are in a clique, the higher the dimension of the geometric object. "We found a world that we had never imagined," says neuroscientist Henry Markram, director of Blue Brain Project and professor at the EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, "there are tens of millions of these objects even in a small speck of the brain, up through seven dimensions. In some networks, we even found structures with up to eleven dimensions."
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Cockatoos keep their tools safe

Only a few animal species such as New Caledonian crows or some primates have so far been found to habitually use tools. Even fewer can manufacture their own tools. Nevertheless, the Goffin's cockatoo, an Indonesian parrot, exhibit both abilities while seemingly lacking a genetic adaptation for tool use. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and the University of Vienna have now shown yet another tool-related ability in these clever parrots. After a brief learning phase, they keep their tools safe nearby without dropping them while feeding until the last of five difficult-to-obtain food rewards has been retrieved. In order to succeed, they are able to adapt their behavioural routines in a way that allows for feeding and holding the tool both at the same time. This not only highlights the learning abilities of these animals but also suggests the ability to plan their body movements. The study was published in the scientific journal Animal Behaviour.Any craftsman knows that it is much easier to always keep a pair of pliers or a hammer safe at hand inside a belt instead of having to retrieve it every time it is needed. Having to look for tools, to buy or to manufacture them usually involves a much larger effort than keeping them safe to reuse them at any time.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded