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This female Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) approaches abstract art as perched on the fringe of a Georgia wetland :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Ischnura_posita
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Immature male Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) photographed in the shade of Cypress in southern Georgia :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Lestes_vigilax
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American Rubyspot (Hetaerina americana) is a beautiful damselfly fitting in with fall colors. Look for it in riparian corridors (Manolis 2003) over most of the country (Puulson 2009). "May congregate in densely packed groups" (DuBois 2010).

Indexed by: #BD_Hetaerina_americana
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Damselfly activity has dramatically declined with fall arrival. However, Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener) can still be found in forested wetlands. For the Rocky Mountain region DuBois (2010) qualifies: "Some fly well into October".

Indexed by: #BD_Lestes_congener
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Both sexes of Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener), a large damselfly, are pictured for your comparison. Spreadwing are fairly easy to identify if you get a look or photograph of the tip of abdomen. Males (left photo) of each species have unique shaped "claspers" and females (right photo) have different "ovipositors".

Indexed by: #BD_Lestes_congener
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8/16/17
2 Photos - View album
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An appropriately named damselfly, the Emerald Spreadwing (Lestes dryas), radiates jewel -like qualities.

Indexed by: #BD_Lestes_dryas
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Discovered a male Western Red Damsel (Amphiagrion abbreviatum) yesterday at small ponding of Sawmill Creek. DuBois (2010) notes that these damselflies can be found even in seepage areas!

Indexed by: #BD_Amphiagrion_abbreviatum
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Distinguishing Dancer from Bluet damselflies can be done by examining the length of the leg spurs on the tibia. The tibia is the brownish segment immediate the black-colored foot. Note the spur length is equal to the space between the spurs. For this photo, this means you are looking at a Bluet. If the spurs were twice as long as the spacing you would be seeing a Dancer.

#sharingknowledge, #shareyourskills
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Noted adult male Pacific Forktail (Ischnura cervula) today near typical wetland habitat. Photo is from about two years ago; it captures the fork tail clearer than my other postings.

Indexed by: #BD_Ischnura_cervula
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First photographed damselfly for 2017... a female Enallagma . It is either a Northern or Boreal Bluet, separating these species requires a look through a microscope at the mesostigmal plates :-)
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