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Eagle Aurora over Norway
Image Credit & Copyright: Bjørn Jørgensen
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap161023.html

What's that in the sky? An aurora. A large coronal mass ejection occurred on our Sun five days before this 2012 image was taken, throwing a cloud of fast moving electrons, protons, and ions toward the Earth. Although most of this cloud passed above the Earth, some of it impacted our Earth's magnetosphere and resulted in spectacular auroras being seen at high northern latitudes. Featured here is a particularly photogenic auroral corona captured above Grotfjord, Norway. To some, this shimmering green glow of recombining atmospheric oxygen might appear as a large eagle, but feel free to share what it looks like to you. Although now past Solar Maximum, our Sun continues to show occasional activity creating impressive auroras on Earth visible only last week.
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Aurora Over White Dome Geyser
Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Howell
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap161002.html

Sometimes both heaven and Earth erupt. Colorful aurorae erupted unexpectedly a few years ago, with green aurora appearing near the horizon and brilliant bands of red aurora blooming high overhead. A bright Moon lit the foreground of this picturesque scene, while familiar stars could be seen far in the distance. With planning, the careful astrophotographer shot this image mosaic in the field of White Dome Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in the western USA. Sure enough, just after midnight, White Dome erupted -- spraying a stream of water and vapor many meters into the air. Geyser water is heated to steam by scalding magma several kilometers below, and rises through rock cracks to the surface. About half of all known geysers occur in Yellowstone National Park. Although the geomagnetic storm that created these aurorae has since subsided, eruptions of White Dome Geyser continue about every 30 minutes.
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Northern Lights above Lofoten
Image Credit & Copyright: Alex Conu
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160616.html

The Aurora Borealis or northern lights are familiar visitors to night skies above the village of Reine in the Lofoten Islands, Norway, planet Earth. In this scene, captured from a mountaintop camp site, the auroral curtains do seem to create an eerie tension with the coastal lights though. A modern perspective on the world at night, the stunning image was chosen as the over all winner in The World at Night's 2016 International Earth and Sky Photo Contest. Selections were made from over 900 entries highlighting the beauty of the night sky and its battle with light pollution.
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Aurora over Sweden
Image Credit & Copyright: Göran Strand
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160503.html

It was bright and green and stretched across the sky. This striking aurora display was captured last month just outside of Östersund, Sweden. Six photographic fields were merged to create the featured panorama spanning almost 180 degrees. Particularly striking aspects of this aurora include its sweeping arc-like shape and its stark definition. Lake Storsjön is seen in the foreground, while several familiar constellations and the star Polaris are visible through the aurora, far in the background. Coincidently, the aurora appears to avoid the Moon visible on the lower left. The aurora appeared a day after a large hole opened in the Sun's corona allowing particularly energetic particles to flow out into the Solar System. The green color of the aurora is caused by oxygen atoms recombining with ambient electrons high in the Earth's atmosphere.
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Aurora in Lapland, Finland: View 2
Rayann: "I had to drive all the way to the northernmost part of Finnish Lapland to find clear skies. Already around 7:30pm local time, we had powerful auroras dancing in the sky. They also presented large amounts of purple/pink on the pictures, which is usually a sign that something big is going to happen."

"This was my last night in Finnish Lapland this January, and I am flying home in a few hours. What a great way to end a wonderful trip in the Arctic!"

"All pictures shot between 1600 and 3200 ISO, f/2.8 and between 5s and 20s. Temperature was about -30°C/-22°F"

Credit: Rayann Elzein
Rayann's website: www.rez-photography.com
Location: Inari, Finnish Lapland
Date: January 11, 2016

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Aurora #Borealis #NorthernLights #Earth #Skywatching #Finland #Inari #Finnish #Lapland #Arctic #Europe #Astrophotography #Photography #Art #SolarSystem #Suomi
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Aurora over Clouds
Image Credit & Copyright: Daniele Boffelli
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap151124.html

Auroras usually occur high above the clouds. The auroral glow is created when fast-moving particles ejected from the Sun impact the Earth's magnetosphere, from which charged particles spiral along the Earth's magnetic field to strike atoms and molecules high in the Earth's atmosphere. An oxygen atom, for example, will glow in the green light commonly emitted by an aurora after being energized by such a collision. The lowest part of an aurora will typically occur at 100 kilometers up, while most clouds usually exist only below about 10 kilometers. The relative heights of clouds and auroras are shown clearly in the featured picture from Dyrholaey, Iceland. There, a determined astrophotographer withstood high winds and initially overcast skies in an attempt to a capture aurora over a picturesque lighthouse, only to take, by chance, the featured picture along the way.
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Northern Lights at Iceland. Photo by Raymond Hoffmann: https://goo.gl/lWvd3i #travel
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Sumo Waggle Adventure by Arild Heitmann: https://goo.gl/pdDkC5 #travel
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