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You have just 12 hours left to vote in PNNL's annual Science as Art contest. YOUR VOTES on PNNL’s Facebook page will determine our winners. This year, we had more than 90 entries submitted by researchers across PNNL. How do you vote? Follow us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/PNNLgov), browse our photo album of science art images and cast your votes by simply “liking” your favorites. Vote for as many as you’d like! Voting starts at 7 am PDT and closes Friday, September 22 at 5 pm PDT. The more voters, the better, so please SHARE this post with friends and colleagues!
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Is there art in the unseen world? At PNNL, we think so. And as proof, our annual Science as Art contest never fails to disappoint. Now it’s your turn to be captivated. Follow us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/PNNLgov) and take a few minutes to vote for your favorite images in our Facebook album of science art images by “liking” your favorites. Vote for as many as you’d like. The more voters, the better, so please SHARE this post with friends and colleagues!
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Have you voted in PNNL’s 2017 Science as Art contest? If not, get a cup of coffee and spend a few minutes checking out the 90-plus cool science images submitted by researchers across PNNL. How do you vote? Follow us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/PNNLgov), browse our photo album of science art images and cast your votes by simply “liking” your favorites. Vote for as many as you’d like! And the more voters, the better, so please SHARE this post with friends and colleagues!
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Voting is now open in PNNL’s 2017 Science as Art contest. Polls will close at 5 p.m. PDT on Friday, Sept. 22. To vote, simply visit the PNNL Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/PNNLgov – follow PNNL and then "like" your favorites on our Science as Art photo album. Read more at https://goo.gl/rKPfYp.
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PNNL's 2017 Science as Art contest is now underway. YOUR VOTES on PNNL’s Facebook page will determine our winners. This year, we had more than 90 entries submitted by researchers across PNNL. How do you vote? Follow us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/PNNLgov), browse our photo album of science art images and cast your votes by simply “liking” your favorites. Vote for as many as you’d like! Voting closes at 5 pm PDT on Friday, September 22. The more voters, the better, so please SHARE this post with friends and colleagues!
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PNNL's 2017 Science as Art contest launches Monday, September 18. YOUR VOTES on PNNL’s Facebook page will determine our winners. This year, we had more than 90 entries submitted by researchers across PNNL. How do you vote? Follow us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/PNNLgov), browse our photo album of science art images and cast your votes by simply “liking” your favorites. Vote for as many as you’d like! Voting starts at 7 am PDT and closes Friday, September 22 at 5 pm PDT. The more voters, the better, so please SHARE this post with friends and colleagues!

#ScienceAsArt #ArtScience
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Did you guess what our September cover image is? Here’s the answer: PNNL scientists are studying tungsten-copper composites as a model material for use in nuclear fusion reactors. On its own, tungsten is durable but brittle. Combining it with copper or other metals with a high melting point, however, makes it tougher and better able to withstand the wear and tear of fusion reactor operation. The copper acts as a bridge, helping to hold the surrounding tungsten together and prevent cracking. This image was captured with a field emission scanning electron microscope and is best viewed with 3D glasses. For more PNNL Science as Art images and the stories behind them, visit https://goo.gl/H9Gyqd.
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We just updated our cover image. What do you think this is, and why is it important? Take a guess, and tune in tomorrow for the answer!
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Did you guess what our August cover image is? Here’s the answer: Every ounce of soil contains thousands of microorganisms – or microbes – including bacteria, fungi and viruses. Good ones contribute to natural processes, such as carbon and nutrient cycling and nitrogen fixation. Bad ones can cause plant disease and death. Although some bacteria form nasty-looking biofilms, others have various unexpected shapes, like the ones featured in our August cover image. PNNL researchers are studying underground communities of microbes in the forests of the Pacific Northwest to unravel the role of microorganisms in soil processes, such as how they extract nutrients from minerals and how they produce and stabilize soil organic matter, while transforming carbon to more persistent forms. This image was captured using a helium ion microscope. For more PNNL Science as Art images and the stories behind them, visit https://goo.gl/J2Bi5K.
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Happy #NationalDonutDay! What’s your favorite flavor? At PNNL, we’re partial to metal organic framework (MOF) nanocomposites, like the one pictured here. This tiny MOF masterpiece – captured with a scanning electron microscope – was overlaid by PNNL scientists on another MOF using core@shell strategy. Over the past few years, MOF research at PNNL (and elsewhere) has resulted in successful development of new processes for adsorption and separation applications, including a carbon dioxide scrubber, methane from natural gas, adsorption cooling, and heterogeneous catalysis. For more PNNL Science as Art images and the stories behind them, visit our Flickr page at https://goo.gl/I5aDaH.

#NationalDoughnutDay
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