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The Seagull Nebula, (IC 2177)
Dominated by the reddish glow of atomic hydrogen, the complex of gas and dust clouds with bright young stars spans over 100 light-years at an estimated 3,800 light-year distance.

Image Credit: ESO - http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1306/
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Star Forming Region LH 95
To better understand the complex and chaotic process of star formation, astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope to image in unprecedented detail the star forming region LH 95 in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy. Usually only the brightest, bluest, most massive stars in a star forming region are visible, but the accompanying image was taken in such high resolution and in such specific colors that many recently formed stars that are more yellow, more dim, and less massive are also discernable. Also visible in this scientifically colored image is a blue sheen of diffuse hydrogen gas heated by the young stars, and dark dust created by stars or during supernova explosions. Studying the locations and abundances of lower mass stars in star forming regions and around molecular clouds helps uncover what conditions were present when they formed. LH 95 spans about 150 light years and lies about 160,000 light years away toward the southern constellation of the Swordfish (Dorado).

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration Acknowledgment: D. Gouliermis (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg)
http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/pr2006055a
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The Seagull Nebula (IC 2177)
A broad expanse of glowing gas and dust presents a bird-like visage to astronomers from planet Earth, suggesting its popular moniker - The Seagull Nebula. This complex of gas and dust clouds with bright young stars lies an estimated 3,800 light-years away near the direction of Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major.

This wide-field view was created from images forming part of the Digitized Sky Survey 2.

Image Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin
http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1237c/
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The Apollo 11 Lunar Module, the Moon, and the Earth
This was the view of the Apollo 11 lunar module "Eagle" as it returned from the surface of the moon to dock with the command module "Columbia". A smooth mare area is visible on the Moon below and a half-illuminated Earth hangs over the horizon. The lunar module ascent stage was about 4 meters across. Command module pilot Michael Collins took this picture just before docking at 21:34:00 UT (5:34 p.m. EDT) 21 July 1969. (Apollo 11, AS11-44-6642) 

Image Credit: NASA / Michael Collins
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/imgcat/html/object_page/a11_h_44_6642.html
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Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1512 in Many Wavelengths
In this view of the center of the magnificent barred spiral galaxy NGC 1512, NASA Hubble Space Telescope's broad spectral vision reveals the galaxy at all wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared. The colors (which indicate differences in light intensity) map where newly born star clusters exist in both "dusty" and "clean" regions of the galaxy.

This color-composite image was created from seven images taken with three different Hubble cameras: the Faint Object Camera (FOC), the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).

NGC 1512 is a barred spiral galaxy in the southern constellation of Horologium. Located 30 million light-years away, relatively "nearby" as galaxies go, it is bright enough to be seen with amateur telescopes. The galaxy spans 70,000 light-years, nearly as much as our own Milky Way galaxy.

The galaxy's core is unique for its stunning 2,400 light-year-wide circle of infant star clusters, called a "circumnuclear" starburst ring. Starbursts are episodes of vigorous formation of new stars and are found in a variety of galaxy environments.

Image Credit: Credit: NASA, ESA, and D. Maoz (Tel-Aviv University and Columbia University)
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2001/16/image/a/
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"Light Echo" Around V838 Monocerotis
V838 Monocerotis is a red variable star, located in the constellation Monoceros about 20,000 light years from the Sun. For reasons unknown, star V838 Mon's outer surface suddenly greatly expanded with the result that it became the brightest star in the entire Milky Way Galaxy in January 2002. Then, just as suddenly, it faded. A stellar flash like this had never been seen before - supernovas and novas expel matter out into space. Although the V838 Mon flash appears to expel material into space, what was seen from the Hubble Space Telescope was actually an outwardly moving light echo of the bright flash. In a light echo, light from the flash is reflected by successively more distant rings in the complex array of ambient interstellar dust that already surrounded the star.

Image Explanation: This is an animation of the evolution of V838 Mon's "light echo", which is created using ESA/Hubble's morphing sequence between the eight individual images that were taken by Hubble Space Telescope from 2002 to 2006.

Images Source and Credit: ESA/Hubble 
http://www.spacetelescope.org/videos/heic0617a/
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Second Largest Spiral Galaxy Distorted By Smaller Galaxy
This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock). Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen to the left of NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter! To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

The lower left spiral arm of NGC 6872 is visibly distorted and is populated by star-forming regions, which appear blue on this image. This may have been caused by IC 4970 recently passing through this arm — although here, recent means 130 million years ago! Astronomers have noted that NGC 6872 seems to be relatively sparse in terms of free hydrogen, which is the basis material for new stars, meaning that if it weren’t for its interactions with IC 4970, NGC 6872 might not have been able to produce new bursts of star formation.

Image Credit:
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1437a/
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M106: A Spiral Galaxy with a Strange Center 
A swirling disk of stars and gas, M106's appearance is dominated by blue spiral arms and red dust lanes near the nucleus. The core of M106 glows brightly in radio waves and X-rays where twin jets have been found running the length of the galaxy. (See image here: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140705.html )

An unusual central glow makes M106 one of the closest examples of the Seyfert class of galaxies, where vast amounts of glowing gas are thought to be falling into a central massive black hole. M106, also designated NGC 4258, is a relatively close 23.5 million light years away, spans 60 thousand light years across, and can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici).

Image Credit: NASA, ESO , NAOJ, Giovanni Paglioli; Assembling and processing: R. Colombari and R. Gendler
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150216.html
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One-Armed Spiral Galaxy NGC 4725 
While most spiral galaxies, including our own Milky Way, have two or more spiral arms, NGC 4725 has only one. This odd galaxy also sports obscuring dust lanes a yellowish central bar structure composed of an older population of stars. NGC 4725 is over 100 thousand light-years across and lies 41 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. Computer simulations of the formation of single spiral arms suggest that they can be either leading or trailing arms with respect to a galaxy's overall rotation. Also included in the frame, a more traditional looking spiral appears as a smaller background galaxy.

Image Credit: Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Space Telescope, 
Additional Color data: Adam Block, Bob Franke, Maurice Toet - Assembly and Processing: Robert Gendler
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150416.html
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Bicolour Image of the NGC 6188 Nebula
NGC 6188 is an emission nebula located about 4,000 light years away in the constellation Ara. NGC 6188 is a star forming nebula, and is sculpted by the massive, young stars that have recently formed there – some are only a few million years old. This spark of formation was probably caused when the last batch of stars went supernova.

Image Credit: S. Lipinski/NASA & ESA
https://www.spacetelescope.org/projects/fits_liberator/fitsimages/slawomir_lipinski_03/
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