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Ruins of the Lithgow Iron & Steel Works

Once the high church of Australian capitalism. Scene of the 1911 worker riots. Now silent.
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Ruins of Newnes Wollemi Wilderness

Candle making a century ago.
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Loading Ramp Harolds Cross

Discretely replaced by a metal ramp (middle distance, left), the old wooden ramp has developed a lean, and has a family of wombats living under it. An essential item on Australian farms, used for loading horses, cattle and sheep, but once they start to lean, it is best to just let nature take its course and not trouble them with stock.
The (very) few crossings over the mountains from the east coast to the tablelands carry the names of the white shepherds, sawyers or surveyors who negotiated a passage. This path was long before known as part of the first people's Yuin Trace.

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Clover Hill

This broad ledge high on the cliffs near the town of Figtree was once a dairy farm. It is now described as a 'managed ruin', which is probably true if the rainforests might be considered to be running the place. This place is an assault on the senses. Access is along a long mountain path crossing dozens of small waterfall filled streams and avalanches. The sound of falls and birds here drown out the silence of past dreams.
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Sea wall at North Wollongong

Falling to the ravages of the Pacific Ocean.
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Majors Creek

Once one of the richest gold fields ever seen, a house slowly fades.
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Jembaicumbene Creek (Jemmi-c'm-bene)

"The Earth is our Mother.
When I die I'm going down there.
When you die you're going there too.
But what are you doing for the Earth?"
(Guboo Ted Thomas)

The ruins sit near Bell's paddock on the the Jembaicumbene (Jemmi-c'm-bene) floodplain. Today the Jembaicumbene is a string of waterholes (like a string of pearls) but when the rain comes the creek can rise and drive everything before it.

European settlers established sheep and cattle stations on the land nearby. The Jembaicumbene is still remembered as birthplace and final resting place (Exter Farm) for Archer, the racehorse that won the first two Melbourne Cups. Archer's photo still graces the wall of the Elrington Hotel at nearby Major's Creek.

The Jembaicumbene was briefly a place of great industry when gold was discovered on the floodplain. The area was home to miners, including a large Chinese population a little to the east in the Jembaicumbene Swamps. Almost half the Chinese miners were under 15 years of age, and when she arrived in 1869 to marry the local shopkeeper Ah Hoy, Kim Linn was one of two Chinese women in the district. With the miners came bushrangers.

When the gold ran out a couple of years later, the population gradually decreased, leaving the the land turned upside down and in the grip of drought.

Today we also remember the Jembaicumbene as the birthplace of two initiated Yuin elders after the miners left: William Iberia Thomas and his son Guboo Ted Thomas (who took great pride in being born under a gum tree at Jembaicumbene in 1909).

#PAHQ_Ara
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Crookwell

This older rural district became rich from potatoes. The stones dug up from cropping were put to good use. Many of the older stone houses have lost their original thatched roofs. A number, like this one, are being given new tin roofs.
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Another life

Many who come to North Queensland never leave.

Image: The SS Maheno was a great ocean liner formerly plying the Pacific (with a Bechstein grand piano). She was beached on Fraser Island in a cyclone in 1935 on route to Japan to be broken up. Mid 2016
(Repost)
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Grand Designs

On the coastal road from Bateman's Bay to Nowra.
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