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Why Butterfly Watch...View for Good Reasons :-)
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This is a Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae) feasting on the nectar of a Morning Glory (?). It's obvious why this butterfly is named after the element sulphur. This is the "most common and wide-ranging" (Glassberg 2011) of the Giant-Sulphur group of four species in the U.S.

Indexed by: #BD_Phoebis_sennae
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Large Orange Sulphur (Phoebis agarithe) is similar to the Mexican Yellow as it irregularly locates northward to South Dakota from preferred subtropical brush habitat (south Texas et al) (Opler and Wright 1999). Comes to flowers and mud puddles (Pyle 1981). Perches with wings closed so the orange upperwing is seen only in flight (Brock and Kaufman 2003).

Indexed by: #BD_Phoebis_agarithe
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Little Yellow (Eurema lisa) is the "most common and most widespread small yellow" of the eastern U.S. (Glassberg 2012). Pyle (1981) highlights a historic observation; Columbus noted from the Santa Maria a mass emigration of butterflies, possibly Little Yellows going to the Caribbean :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Eurema_lisa
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It is easy to watch nature shows on TV and be dazzled by the colorful life that lives in the Tropics. Now imagine a butterfly from Mexico in your yard. The Mexican Yellow (Eurema mexicana) is a distinct possibility sometimes traveling 1,000+ miles north (Opler and Wright 1999) from breeding sites of extreme southern U.S. Though a little late for this to happen in the current calendar year, plant some senna (Glassberg 2011) in your yard and look for this species next fall :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Eurema_mexicana
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Yellow is one of the earliest color pigments used in artwork; Wikipedia reports the Lascaux cave (France) has a 17,000 year old wall painting of a yellow horse. Of course, I have not found such historic drawings with my camera, but I did manage to photograph a stunning Southern Dogface (Colias cesonia) recently. Enjoy :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Colias_cesonia
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Sleepy Orange (Eurema nicippe) can be found in the southern third of the United States...and seen all year in the Deep South (Pyle 1981). It is an immigrant into the northern areas of U.S. annually (Glassberg 2012).

Indexed by: #BD_Eurema_nicippe
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Another Pipevine Swallowtail lookalike is the Red-spotted Admiral (Limenitis arthemis). The individual pictured is quite worn and quite understated in coloration. Glassberg (2012) notes that this butterfly is one of the most desired-to-see species. Folks in the east half of the country should look for this butterfly come April/May of 2018.
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Underwing lookalike (blue with spotting) for Pipevine Swallowtail is Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus). This butterfly can be attracted to your yard with Sassafras and Spicebush plantings (Glassberg 2011).

Indexed by: #BD_Papilio_troilus
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Note the subtle blue tones of this worn Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor) determined by angle of light (Glassberg 2012). Many other butterflies mimic color and pattern of this species because birds avoid it. Why? According to Pyle (1981) the larval host plants (Pipevines) contain chemicals that are distasteful and so becomes the caterpillar :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Battus_philenor
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