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Spanner, the Google database that mastered time, is now open to everyone.

"They equipped Google's data centers with a series of GPS receivers and atomic clocks. The GPS receivers, much like the one in your cell phone, grab the time from various satellites orbiting the globe, while the atomic clocks keep their own time. Then they shuttle their time readings to master servers in each data center. These masters constantly trade readings in an effort to settle on a common time."

"A margin of error still exists, but thanks to so many readings, the masters can bootstrap a far more reliable timekeeping service. 'This gives you faster-than-light coordination between two places.'"

"Google calls this timekeeping technology TrueTime, and only Google has it."

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Top 30 books mentioned on Stack Overflow. Working Effectively with Legacy Code by Michael C. Feathers, Design Patterns by Ralph Johnson, Erich Gamma, John Vlissides, and Richard Helm, Clean Code by Robert C. Martin, Java Concurrency in Practice by Brian Goetz and Tim Peierls, Domain-Driven Design by Eric Evans, JavaScript: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford, Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture by Martin Fowler, Code Complete by Steve McConnell, Refactoring by Martin Fowler and Kent Beck, Head First Design Patterns by Eric Freeman, Elisabeth Freeman, Kathy Sierra, and Bert Bates, The C Programming Language by Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie, Effective C++ by Scott Meyers, Test-driven Development by Kent Beck, Introduction to Algorithms, 3rd Edition by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein, Mastering Regular Expressions by Jeffrey Friedl, CLR Via C# by Jeffrey Richter, Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X by Aaron Hillegass, Effective STL by Scott Meyers, Modern C++ Design by Andrei Alexandrescu, Large-Scale C++ Software Design by John Lakos, Inside the Microsoft Build Engine by Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi and William Bartholomew, Programming Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0 Core Reference by Dino Esposito, XUnit Test Patterns by Gerard Meszaros, Concurrent Programming on Windows by Joe Duffy, Compilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools (the "Dragon Book") by Alfred V. Aho, Framework Design Guidelines by Krzysztof Cwalina and Brad Abrams, C++ Coding Standards: 101 Rules, Guidelines, and Best Practices by Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu, UNIX Network Programming by W. Richard Stevens, Bill Fenner, and Andrew M. Rudoff, Purely Functional Data Structures by Chris Okasaki, and The Art of Unit Testing by Roy Osherove.

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How many millions of lines of code does it take? Chart of various projects ranging from the few hundred thousand, for an iPhone game, all the way up to 2 billion for Google.

I've heard Google employees crank out 15 million lines of code per month.

Basically the equivalent of all of Windows every 3 months.

Though if you added up all the lines of code every employee produced on every project, it might be in the same ballpark for other big companies like Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, etc.

The reason it's easier to do that for Google is that they made the decision when the company was started to put all the code in a single directory tree, so all Google's projects are in a sense part of one big project, something that isn't true for other companies.

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Stackoverflow looked at what tags are disproportionately used more on weekdays vs weekends. Used disproportionately on weekdays: sharepoint, tsql, powershell, soap, vba, extjs, sql-server-2008, oracle, xslt, iis, excel, excel-vba, svn, internet-explorer, selenium, sql-server.

Used disproportionately on weekends: haskell, assembly, opengl, pointers, algorithm, c, python-3.x, swing, recursion, class, express, c++11, google-app-engine, meteor, math, heroku

Weekend tags with increasing usage: actionscript-3, android-fragments, android-layout, button, gridview, listview, selenium, unity3d.

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A Python-to-Go transpiler has been developed by Google, and it's called Grumpy, possibly because Gopy isn't a word.

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"Browsix is a framework that bridges the considerable gap between conventional operating systems and the browser, enabling unmodified programs expecting a Unix-like environment to run directly in the browser. Browsix does this by mapping low-level Unix primitives, like processes and system calls, onto existing browser APIs, like Web Workers and postMessage."

"Browsix brings all of these abstractions into unmodified browsers, and is isolated and secured to the same extent any normal web page is: at the level of the browser tab."

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Kakoune tries to beat vim at its own game by providing a better grammar for text editing (object verb rather than verb object), providing visual feedback before an editing command is carried out, multiple selection, command discoverability, and Unix shell interaction.

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"Internally, Dart has been a major success at Google. Both the AdWords and AdSense teams (which drive most of Google's revenue), as well as the Google Fiber teams, now rely on it to write their consumer-facing web apps." "The Google teams that use it report that it gives them a 25 to 100 percent increase in development speed."

"By default, Angular 2.0 uses Microsoft's TypeScript as its preferred language. Unsurprisingly, for AngularDart 2.0, which is launching out of beta today, that language is Dart."

"As far as the language itself, Dart is getting an optional strong mode that essentially turns Dart into a strongly typed language, as well as generic methods. Google also promises that the compiler can now compile most code to JavaScript in less than a second."

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Why so many mobile apps get soft launched in Australia. I didn't know so many mobile apps were soft launched in Australia. Not being there. Anyway, the reasons are: It's far away and relatively disconnected from other countries, and its inhabitants are more likely to be early adopters. Says Tinder CEO Sean Rad. The article goes on to give suggestions for setting up analytics for a successful soft launch: user flows, so you can tell where in users' sessions they are quitting, identifying 'aha' moments, and identifying 'sticky' features that drive retention.
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