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Do we really need another food collection?

I don't like food being photographed in restaurants, but we love to cook, and eat, and I've been thinking about creating a collection where there's a discussion about produce, recipes, photographs of dishes we've created etc. I'm not entirely convinced but would be interested in your thoughts?

This is a simple pesto dish, fettuccine, pesto, slow roasted tomatoes and a sprinkling of parmesan. Takes no time at all to make and any left over pesto is great with lamb.
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Keeping it simple

The web is an amazing resource to learn how to do all manner of things. It can also be something of a trap, taking us off in the wrong direction. I fell into something of a trap as I've researched bread making, in recent weeks I've started trying new recipes and techniques and the results were disappointing to say the least. However, I've gone back to where I started, the techniques demonstrated on +Trevor J. Wilson 's site, and the improvement has been significant.
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An experiment with retarding the proofing

Although common in baking, introducing retardation into the proofing process brings a range of different variables that need to be understood and tweaked. This was my second attempt, and while the oven spring was great, and the flavour beautiful, the crumb was a little denser than normal. I suspect that was because it didn't proof for long enough, so I'll leave the next loaf in the fridge for a few more hours. I'm also not sure if retarding the proofing works too well with lower hydration recipes, so with the next one I'll bump the hydration up to 75%. The experiment continues...
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Low hydration dough

I seemed to hit a brick wall for a while but a few changes to my method last week resulted in much greater oven spring and a lovely crumb, progress at last :)
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The quest continues...

Although my baguettes have looked OK, the texture hasn't been as light as I would have liked, and although that's more down to my lack of skill than anything else, I'll take any help I can get so I bought a small packet of French flour from a local importer to see how much difference that makes. First batch goes in the oven in an hour or so.
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Adventures with Bread

The quest to make a good baguette has begun. A charitable description of my first effort would be "rustic", and I need to be more careful working the dough, the gluten developed too much in these. But as always, it's fun :)
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A new pot for breadmaking

I've been using a normal dutch oven for bread baking for some time, but it can be difficult to get the dough out of the banneton at times, especially the higher hydration ones. So this Lodge combo pot was acquired via Amazon and the first loaf will be baked later today.
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Getting ready to make baguettes

I'm planning on making baguettes so I took some discard from my wholewheat starter and started feeding it white flour earlier this week. The activity seemed fairly weak after the vigour of the wholewheat starter so I thought I'd better test it. This loaf was using my usual quantity of flour, all white this time, and 72% hydration, and I was quite surprised. I expected good oven spring because it's all white flour, but for a quick test this loaf had a very light moist crumb. Can't wait to try baguettes now :)
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Toast Bread

What's the ideal toast bread? Loads of flavour but the crumb small and even enough to stop the honey leaking through :)

I think I've got the formula right for our tastes, 42% wholewheat, 72% hydration, 7 hours bulk ferment but, in the cooler weather of winter, 4 hours proofing. The last 3 loaves have all turned out much the same, moist but not too open crumb, and buckets of flavour.
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Adventures with Bread

33% wholewheat, and 72% hydration, premixed the dough the day before (with no starter), and then 7 hours bulk ferment with hourly stretch and fold, and then 3 hours proofing.

With the home milled wholewheat, the dough gets quite sticky but not too bad. I'll try this again at 75% hydration.
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