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I started this project as a quilt along on August 11. We were emailed instructions three times a week. I had to take a break after finishing the blocks, but I put the final border on it today and hung it up to enjoy until I can get to quilting it. It is 56 inches square.

I'd give myself an A for earnest effort and follow-through, but a B- or C+ for results of execution. It's pretty, though, and I'm proud of it and of how hard I worked and what I learned.
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13 large blocks and 12 small blocks yet to be sewn together. Then two borders will be added. There are 136 flying geese units, and I bet I will not do 136 more in all the remaining quilts I make, combined. It's been only 30 days since I began, but feels much longer. I am slap happy from the experience, but also gratified.

And now I'm putting these blocks away to focus on baby stuff for awhile, then I will finish and quilt it, along with the other quilt along top I did this summer.
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Hand-finishing a baby quilt for daughter #2 this afternoon and evening.
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Need space to lay out 141 blocks, arranged in this pattern but with best contrast, then sew together row by row, all without kitten interference.

This type of quilt-making taxes my serendipitous mind...I will look at it as nines and threes, that will help.
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This quilt story is sweet and interesting, and seems to be the source for the pattern of the quilt along I'm doing. There's a link at the bottom of the post for that. I'm completing part three; sewing quarter square blocks for it, then will start to put it together tomorrow or Sunday.
Learn Family Scrap Exchange Quilt
Learn Family Scrap Exchange Quilt
andreasuzannesquilts.blogspot.com
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These are fat quarters. Normally if you were to ask for a quarter yard of fabric at a store, you'd get 9 inches by 42/44 inches. Cut this way, they are 18x21. I don't buy them very often, because they are usually $2.49 each, which is about $10 a yard. I do buy fabric that is 10-15 a yard, but only when it's on sale at 30-50% off; the sale price leads my choices, pretty much.

Today these fat quarters were $1 each at Jo-Ann Fabrics. That's 60% off, making them $4/yard, and worth stocking up on, which I have always wished I could do. I spent $40, which is a lot, but at regular price it would be $100, and unlike the bolts of fabric, they have never before been on sale like this when I could go there to shop.

Online, quilters are always showing off their beautiful 1930s-40s style prints and designer lines, and I'm envious of their means and ways. But, these remind me of my late 1960s-early 70s childhood, and that is also beautiful to me. :-) Something I've learned over the past two years of self-taught sewing is that these cuts are more economical in sewing than done the other way. 40 fat quarters of pretty prints will make lots of lovely quilt blocks and little bags.
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Serious upgrade from my 12x18 cutting mat. It just barely fits my ironing board "cutting table," but has tiny numbers outside the grid so you always know where you are, and squares marked in the center for typical block sizes.
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I sewed this together today. I've never done one on point, and just guessed at it, so my edges will be imperfect. But it'll still be nice. Currently, it's about 60"x60", but I'm adding patchwork to the top and bottom and then a border all the way around, so it'll end up around 64"x72".
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Makin' baby chew toys.
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I finished putting together the first of two baby quilts. Despite these photos, it is nicely squared. Now it just needs quiliting. I think I will do partly machine quilting and partly big stitch hand quilting. I was looking for tips on that, though, and one said not to use embroidery floss, because it isn't twisted and won't wear well. But all my embroidery floss has always been twisted—in fact, the kids used to call it "twist" like the Tailor of Gloucester, so I don't know why they were saying that. You can see it if you separate one strand from the rest.

Anyway, this way I can work on it sitting in my bed at night watching TV, which is a nice thing to do, and it will give it an added homespun touch. Theron says it looks very British baby boy around WW1. :-)

And now I have roughly a month to make the other one.
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2/2/17
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