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Irina T.

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Adger Cowans

" I just had a desire to do something with my hands. Photography was, either you get the shot or you don’t. But you also had to think about the wind, apertures. You have to learn the technique so the technique is out of the way, then you can go with the feeling that is going through you. Your eyes only see, they don’t feel. The eyes only see. It’s the heart that feels. If you can take the feeling of what you see into the photograph, now you are on to something."
One of our greatest but too often overlooked contemporary photographers, Adger Cowans has been shooting indelible images for more than half a century.
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Irina T.

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The “Living Photographs” of Mole and Thomas.
 
The “Living Photographs” of Arthur Mole and John Thomas — extraordinary group portraits made with the dutiful help of thousands of servicemen and staff from various US military camps: http://buff.ly/2igAlBa

Pictured here, a portrait of the then president Woodrow Wilson, ca. 1918.
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cyncere walker's profile photoputra armada's profile photo
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O
Saya suka saya suka
 ·  Translate
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Irina T.

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We celebrate their lives and the contributions they made to the world
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Salam kimsiz
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Irina T.

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Howard Bingham | May 29, 1939 – December 15, 2016
"Howard Bingham, who has died aged 77, was a photographer who became Muhammad Ali’s closest friend and shot perhaps a million of images of the fighter. “I think we became friends because I didn’t want nothing from him,” Bingham said in 2004. “We just became friends, and we stayed friends."
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Abdelmoutaleb Kandil's profile photoSaturday Nigger's profile photo
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Rest in peace.
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Irina T.

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"Tony Vaccaro wanted to become a foreign correspondent, but after being raised in Italy, he returned to the United States less than proficient in English. One of his teachers at Isaac E. Young High School in New Rochelle, N.Y., suggested he become a photographer instead. (He joined a camera club begun by his science teacher, Bertram L. Lewis.) He worked as a caddy to afford a $47.50 American-made Argus C2 camera, intent on taking it with him when he went to war.

That’s why I became a photographer,” he said. “I had to show this hell to the rest of the world.”"
Excerpted/read full
2013
http://nyti.ms/XG7NS1
 
Tony Vaccaro took nearly 8,000 photographs during World War II. In the decades that followed the war, Tony would go on to become a renowned commercial photographer. Today he celebrates his 94th birthday! #HappyBirthday
📷 The Violinist, Venice, Italy, 1947 http://buff.ly/2h85nyK
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Irina T.

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Ming Smith

"Gordon Parks wrote of the transcendent quality of Ms. Smith’s work, praising her ability to make visible the “ghosts” that remained imperceptible to most of us: “The camera, with its special attention to detail, enables one to hold on to a lifetime full of ghosts that might otherwise crumble to dust,” he wrote. “What the memory often holds is not exactly what the camera records. . . Wondrous imagery keeps cropping up, stuffing themselves into [Ms. Smith’s] sight. She grasps them and gives eternal life to things that might well have been forgotten.”

Excerpted from the linked article
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Also
https://aperture.org/blog/vision-justice-online-kamoinge-workshop/
It is the often oblique details in Ming Smith's photographs that provide their most profound meaning. Consider the eerie photograph of a person walking on a Harlem street, a blur moving across the image's surface. The street is urban and depressed; graffiti mars steel gates and a portentous crucifix-like ...
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Rodrigo Pissarra's profile photo
 
That the whole point from 'The visible and the invisible' from M. Merleau-Ponty, artists are experts in turning visible what is invisible.
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Irina T.

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Interesting photos from the past. "When Albert Kahn, a wealthy French banker and philanthropist, decided he wanted to commission a photographic “archive of the planet” he wasn’t joking. And though the idea of cataloging the earth seems whimsical in scope today, the pictures he helped create between 1909 and 1931 hold our attention like few others from the era.

They are some of the finest examples of early color pictures made using the Lumière brothers’ innovative Autochrome process. Autochromes employed microscopic grains of dyed potato starch to filter the color spectrum into three additive shades. The results, when viewed through a stereoscope or back-lit by a light box, were among the first natural color images in that their tones were derived from the color spectrum of light and not the artist’s hand.

In all, Kahn’s team of cameramen visited fifty countries to collect 72,000 photographs, some of which are among the first color images ever made in places like Vietnam, Brazil, Norway, and Mongolia. But with its essentialized worldview, Archives of the Planet also laid groundwork for the kind of exotic voyeurism made ubiquitous by publishers like National Geographic."
Albert Kahn’s search for a full-spectrum planetary family album
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Olivier Malinur's profile photo
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Put some colour to this and you will be getting something similar.
My Champagne family before first world war, probably around 1912...
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/rCCn1pYBEPtUNJy_uqE7xMosroK_R34EBX_2DvYGiBkBKkMUCnfKf0Uw4FVxv-HaAqP78gPGzQc
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Irina T.

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Eastman Museum

"Objects from the museum’s photography, technology and George Eastman Legacy collections are now searchable,” the Eastman Museum writes in its press release, “and more objects from the museum’s vast holdings are being added on an ongoing basis.” And, to honor Eastman’s considerable legacy in motion pictures, “objects from the moving image collection will become accessible in the coming months.”
There was a time when anyone with even the remotest interest in photography knew the name Eastman, if not the life and work of George Eastman himself.
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Gary Matthews's profile photocyncere walker's profile photo
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Very cute
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Irina T.

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John W. Mosley (1907-1969)

"Over the course of his career, Mosley produced 300,000 photographs, most of which are now housed in the Temple University Libraries’ Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection. The 150 prints included in A Million Faces constitute a representative selection of his work. Activists and celebrities, such as Martin Luther King, Jr, Ella Fitzgerald, and Muhammad Ali, are scattered throughout. But far more of the photographs capture ordinary black Philadelphians in moments that range from the heroic — protesting racial discrimination — to the mundane — enjoying a day at the beach. The result is a wide-ranging and often intimate look at four decades of life in Philadelphia’s black community."
Between the 1930s and '60s, John W. Mosley made photographs without any expectation that white people would see them. His intended audience was black.
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cyncere walker's profile photo
 
She is fine
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Irina T.

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Enjoy the holidays, my best wishes to you and your families. Merry Christmas!

Image:
Christmas peddler, Dec. 19, 1910/Library of Congress
https://www.loc.gov/item/2003681391/
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Jun Bandigan's profile photoCesar Orlando's profile photo
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...:D
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