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A letter to Henry Ford.

#FordHeritage

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Ford will be talking new tech at next week’s Mobile World Conference, in Barcelona, as the world’s largest gathering of mobile industry professionals celebrates its 30th anniversary.

The incredible ability of modern mobile phones would have been unimaginable 80 years ago, but it’s worth remembering that the mobile phone phenomenon didn’t start with the Motorola brick phone of the early 1980s; the very first mobile phones of the 1940s were only mobile because heavy batteries needed to make them work were mounted in the boots of large cars.

As this image proves, you were lucky if you had room in your trunk for a spare tire after the equipment was installed.

#ThrowBackThursday #TBT 
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What are your views on flares?
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It may come as a surprise to learn that Ford once made aeroplanes, in fact, during the late 1920s the Ford Aircraft Division was reputedly the "largest manufacturer of commercial airplanes in the world."

Production of the Trimotor, nicknamed "The Tin Goose," started in 1925 and the it was sold around the world. Designed for the civil aviation market, a total of 199 were made with some seeing service with military units. The one pictured here was used to transport the U.S. mail.

The heyday for Ford's transport was relatively brief, lasting only until 1933, when more modern airliners began to appear. Rather than completely disappearing, the Trimotors gained an enviable reputation for durability with Ford ads in 1929 proclaiming, "No Ford plane has yet worn out in service." First being relegated to second- and third-tier airlines, the Trimotors continued to fly into the 1960s.

#ThrowBackThursday #TBT
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Ford design legend Eugene Bordinat, Jr. was born 97 years ago this week.

Were it not for his silky design skills, the iconic Ford Mustang might have been a very different car; Bordinat said of the now iconic pony car, "we started out the Mustang as a secretary's car, and all of a sudden we had a behemoth."

Bordinat joined Ford in 1947 and was promoted to vice president for styling and chief designer in 1961, a position he held for over 19 years, longer than anyone in Ford Styling before or since. The University of Michigan graduate oversaw the development of some of Ford’s most iconic cars ranging from the Mustang and Falcon to the Lincoln Continental Mk III and Mercury Cougar.

Bordinat was an enthusiast of the wire-wheels-and-stand-up-grilles school of design, as reflected in the Continental and a number of other cars he styled.

Bordinat remained vice president of design until just after his 60th birthday in 1980. In his retirement he wrote a light-hearted autobiography manuscript entitled My Days at the Court of Henry II, however, he died suddenly of an undiagnosed lung ailment at the Henry Ford Hospital on August 11, 1987, and although his widow Teresa said that she would finish it, the work was never published.

#ThrowBackThursday #TBT #FordHeritage
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#ThrowBackThursday - Pictured here (centre) in his official Lincoln Continental, American baseball legend George Herman "Babe" Ruth was born 122 years ago this week.

Ruth’s 22- season Major League Baseball (MLB) career saw him win an unprecedented seven World Series championships and establish many MLB records, two of which still stand today, but it was his 15-year stint at the New York Yankees that saw him transcend the sport to become a national hero.

When Ruth joined the Yankees in 1920, America was still reeling from the trauma of World War 1 and the deadly 1918 flu pandemic that infected 500 million people world-wide. Ruth’s unprecedented athletic feats and larger-than-life personality encapsulated the mood of America’s largest city and he became an icon of the significant social changes that marked the era – it was said that "Ruth was New York incarnate; uncouth and raw, flamboyant and flashy, oversized, out of scale, and absolutely unstoppable".

Considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time, he retired in 1935 and later went on to travel around the country giving batting lessons to Little Leaguers and speeches across the country. He did so in a ’48 Lincoln that was gifted to him by Ford
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#ThrowBackThursday - This is the extraordinary story of George Washington Carver; a man who was born a slave, but became a master of scientific discovery and an important influence on Henry Ford.

Carver was born in Diamond Grove, Newton County, Missouri, possibly in 1864 or 1865; exact date is not known. Within a week of his birth he was kidnapped, along with his sister and mother, and taken by raiders to Kentucky to be sold. Their master, a German American immigrant called Moses Carver, sent people to find them, but they could only located the infant George.

After slavery was abolished, Moses Carver and his wife Susan raised George as their own, teaching him to read and write and encouraging him to pursue an education. Black people were not allowed at the public school in Diamond Grove, so Carver travelled to a town 10 miles away, where he befriended a woman called Mariah Watkins who told him, "you must learn all you can, then go back out into the world and give your learning back to the people." These words made a great impression on the 13-year-old Carver.

He attended a series of schools before earning his diploma at Minneapolis High School and being accepted at Highland College, both in Kansas. When he arrived, however, they rejected him because of his race.

After this disappointment, Carver made a claim on some land, manually ploughing 17 acres (69,000 m2) for planting rice, corn and garden produce, as well as various fruit trees, forest trees, and shrubbery. He also earned money by odd jobs in town and worked as a ranch hand.

In early 1888, Carver obtained a $300 loan at the Bank of Ness City for education. Within months he had moved to Iowa and was studying art and piano at Simpson College, Indianola. His art teacher recognised Carver's talent for painting flowers and plants and encouraged him to study botany.

When he joined the Iowa State Agricultural College in 1891, Carver was the first ever black student. After obtaining a master's degree, he continued his research at the university and his work gained national recognition and respect as he became the first black faculty member at Iowa State.

In 1896, Carver was invited to head the Agriculture Department at the Tuskegee Institute, a private, historically black university in Alabama, established by Booker T. Washington, a key proponent of African-American businesses and one of the founders of the National Negro Business League.

He taught methods of crop rotation and dedicated himself to the promotion of alternative crops to cotton, such as peanuts and sweet potatoes - he wanted poor farmers to grow alternative crops both as a source of their own food and as the basis of other products that would help them to earn money; one of his practical bulletins for farmers contained 105 food recipes using peanuts.

Carver taught generations of black students farming techniques for self-sufficiency and was also a leader in promoting environmentalism; he received numerous honours for his work, including being made a member of the Royal Society of Arts in England, one of only a handful of Americans at that time to receive this honour.

In 1937, Carver attended two chemurgy conferences – an emerging field in the 1930s that looked in to using agricultural products in industry. He was invited by Henry Ford to speak at the conference held in Dearborn, Michigan, and the pair developed a friendship. In 1942, Henry Ford showed his admiration for his friend and colleague by naming the Ford nutrition laboratory after him.

In his seventies Caver created the George Washington Carver Foundation that not only served as a museum for his work, but also an agricultural research programme that still exists today. He donated savings of around $60,000, the equivalent of over $1,000,000 in today’s money.

As Carver's health declined, Ford later installed an elevator in the university dormitory where he lived, so that the elderly man would not have to climb stairs and in 1942, Ford built a replica of Carver's birth cabin at the Henry Ford Museum, in Dearborn.

Carver died January 5, 1943, at the age of 78 from complications after a fall. On his grave is written, “He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honour in being helpful to the world.”
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2005 #FordGT - Want to see more of this vehicle?

Go here! 👉 ford.to/2kiIer3 👈
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#ThrowBackThursday - Of all the people we lost in 2016, Muhammad Ali is undoubtedly one of the most sorely missed; he would have celebrated his 75th birthday this week.

Ali is widely regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated sports figures of the 20th century. Even during the early stages of his boxing career he stood out as an inspiring, controversial, and polarising figure both inside and outside the ring.

He remains the only three-time heavyweight champion, and was ranked as the greatest athlete of the 20th century by Sports Illustrated and the Sports Personality of the Century by the BBC.

In 1978 Ali flew to the town of Fairbanks, in Alaska. Just 120 miles from the Arctic circle where temperatures range from -30 °C in winter, to 90 °C in the summer. He was there to support Ford Motorcraft’s Tested Tough ad campaign and is pictured here surrounded by Ford Motorcraft parts.

The advert highlighted the strength of Ford Motocraft batteries by installing them in to 50 cars and subjecting them to a sever testing regime around the arctic town; after six months of testing, not a single battery had failed.

In true Ali style, the adverts were littered with rhymes, such as: “Alaska’s cold could make a polar bear shiver, but Motorcraft batteries had the power to deliver.”

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