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Three straight days of sunshine and normal daytime highs are generating good wildflower growth/display. Is the same true for your area? Search this weekend, coinciding with Earth Day, and celebrate the annual explosion of life. Pictured is Glacier Lily (Erythronium grandiflorum) restricted to the Pacific Northwest and disjunct Rocky Mountain locations. #CreateABetterEarth

Indexed by: #BD_Erythronium_grandiflorum
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Low Larkspur (Delphinium bicolor) are just coming into a blooming condition locally. As hinted by name this plant typically does not eclipse 16 inches in height (Schiwmann 2005). Another feature of this plant is the toxicity to cattle if eaten (Lackschewitz 1986). Shared with #wildflowerwednesday and compiler +Bette Kauffman
#CreateABetterEarth #EarthDayEveryday

Indexed by: #BD_Delphinium_bicolor
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Early posting for the Earth Day special edition of #wildflowerwednesday compiled by +Bette Kauffman :-) Appropriately found Western Trillium (Trillium ovatum) blooming yesterday. There are 38 species of Trillium found in the eastern half of the country in addition to the Pacific Northwest (Brandenburg 2010). All have at least a "mild fetid odor" according Sanders (2003) in order to draw flies for pollination.
#CreateABetterEarth #EarthDayEveryday

Indexed by: #BD_Trillium_ovatum
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Photographed the first blooming Nineleaf Biscuitroot (Lomatium triternatum) yesterday. The plant was small as would be expected early in the season. As spring progresses it can range from 6-30 inches (Turner and Gustafson 2006). The photos below illustrate how "rangy/lanky" this plant can become. The leaves are string-like, very distinct.

As a follower of this Collection, you are likely a lover of wildflowers or Earth in general. Why not post a photo(s) proclaiming this fact over the next several days. It would be the perfect opportunity to support Earth Day (April 22) awareness and appreciation. Simply add the hashtag #EarthDayEveryday or #CreateABetterEarth to your post. If you can include some words describing your love of whatever plant you photographed. Join multitudes of Google Plus users participating in this Earth Day initiative. Thanks for your consideration :-)

Indexed by: #BD_Lomatium_triternatum
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4/12/18
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Blue-eyed Mary (Collinsia parviflora) is a small, but colorful addition to the spring landscape. This species is basically distributed in the American West, but there are 18 other species of this genus found in the Midwest et al (Brandenburg 2010). Shared with #wildflowerwednesday and +Bette Kauffman.
Yes, it is #EarthDayEveryday

Indexed by: #BD_Collinsia_parviflora
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Winter won't go away completely :-)

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No new wildflowers in bloom today. Here is a collage of five species...some close to flower bloom :-)

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Wildflowers still slow in blooming with below normal temperatures and clouds. Still this early season annual, Spring Draba (Draba verna), is not affected, already flowering and going to seed! This is a small plant easily overlooked, much like grains of salt scattered on the ground. Can be found in the eastern half and the western third of the U.S. (https://bit.ly/2q8HnNl).

Enjoy #wildflowerwednesday compiled by +Bette Kauffman...and don't forget to check out your own neighborhood for beautiful wildflowers.

indexed by: #BD_Draba_verna
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Different kind of flower from a woody plant :-)
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Stolon derived mat of basal leaves from Pussytoes (Antennaria sp.). There are thirteen species in Montana (Schiemann 2006). Once the plant flowers it is very hard to get the flower and leaves all in focus (true for most wildflowers :-). Note the hairy/wooly leaves characteristic of these species. These patches are readily found now in meadows and moist open woods (Hitchcock and Cronquist 1973).

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