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Google is getting rid of Collections, so there will be no more posts from me here.

If you would like to continue receiving information about 'Writing Children's Literature', there's always my blog, where you can sign up to my newsletter.
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There's a lot to unpack here.

Here's another side of it: When graphic s*x is written by men, it's seen as more dangerous and possibly creepy when marketed to children.

(I'm not denying the sexism in all this.)

But I'm less conservative than many when it comes to letting young YA readers read.

After all, teenagers are having s*x. And even if they're not, they really should be thinking deeply (and reading about it, safely) for years before they do it with somebody else, no?

While this specific kind of literary sexism continues, I would encourage female fantasy authors to make the most of your position to model healthy consensual s*x to the younger audience that will inevitably find you.

Perhaps this won't work, because you're not writing that kind of s*x.

But being in front of YA eyes is such a powerful position for social change.

The most powerful position of all.

Maybe make the most of it?

Since so much needs to change?

(reposted because anything on this topic gets removed by Google.)
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The rigmarole of just entering school for some students
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"The status tournament of adolescence" is a term used by Katherine S. Newman in her book Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings.

School traditions such as homecoming royalties, dances, athletics and so on encourage a high school hierarchy, in which those at the bottom feel hugely dispirited, alienated, and a few dangerously vengeful.

There's an argument that until hierarchical high school culture is changed completely, any security measures schools put in place are fruitless.
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"The Drifting Classroom ends up featuring everything from plant monsters that eat people to psychic communication that travels through thousands of years of time, but it’s not the fantastical that sticks in the mind as you read it—it’s the actual terrors of childhood that it’s built on."
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