Post has shared content
 
This great photo was shared by +Charles Lupica!

Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
I went to the Bellevue Washington botanical garden with my wife yesterday. The Iris are in full bloom.  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
 
This terrific photo was shared by +Duncan McInnis!

Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
 
This terrific photo was shared by +Antony Northcutt!

Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
 
This great photo was shared by +Ofer Dub!

Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content

Post has shared content
This great photo was original shared by +Julio Aedo!


Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
" Hoy para comer tocaba Romanesco."
El romanesco (Brassica oleracea) es un híbrido[cita requerida] de brécol (Brassica oleracea var. italica) y coliflor (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) de la familia de las brasicáceas. El brécol romanesco fue documentado inicialmente en Italia (como Broccolo romanesco) en el siglo XVI.
Como todas las especies de esta familia, es rico en vitamina C, fibra soluble y carotenoides. Se suele consumir cocido o al vapor aunque también se suele utilizar como verdura cruda.
La romicia es un ejemplo perfecto de un fractal en la naturaleza
Una de sus más llamativas características es que presenta geometría fractal en su estructura. La cantidad de inflorescencias que compone el brecol romanesco es un número Fibonacci.
#Romanesco #Fractal #btpmacropro #hqspmacro  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
 
This great photo was original shared by +Paul Howard!


Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
Gettin' Ready to Hang with Mick and Keith

Yeah, really shoulda been a rock star..................

#portraiture   #selfie   #hqspportraits   #blackandwhite  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
 
This beautiful photo was original shared by +Pranab Banerjee!

Please circle this talented photographer, and be sure to comment on the original post.
Pink Mushroom

I have never seen a pink mushroom until I came across this one. It was beautiful - almost flowerlike. So had to take a picture :) Somehow, I find the color and the texture extraordinarily elegant!

Happy Friday everyone ...

#allthingsred, +AllThingsRed , +Lucille Galleli , +Stephen Thackeray
#hqspflowers +HQSP Flowers curated by +Melania Pierce +Kanlaya Chungsangornpornsuk +Wayne Lu +Iva Pas +Foto KJ 
#Macro4All by +Bill Urwin, +Thomas Kirchen, +Walter Soestbergen (+Macro4All )
#hqspmacro +HQSP Macro curated by +Terrie Gray +Robert Vierthaler +Albert Vuvu Konde +Stefanie Schächtel
#QuirkyNature curated by +Carissa Braun
#flowerpower curated by +Edith Kukla and +Robert Vierthaler
#ColorsOnFriday +ColorsOnFriday curated by +Britta Rogge and +Karsten Meyer
#floralfriday +FloralFriday  curated by +Tamara Pruessner, +Beth Akerman, +Kiki Nelson, and +Eustace James
#flower #floral #mushroom #macro #photography
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
This magnificent photo was originally shared by +Don Komarechka!

Please circle this talented photographer and support their work! Be sure to visit the +"On Black" Photography page and comment on the original post.
Snowflake-a-Day #11
I love these snowflakes. Broad branches, balance, and a change in growth pattern right near the ends to give a spiky star-like appearance. What at first might seem like symmetry will quickly disappear as you look into the details, and I personally think this makes them all the more beautiful. View large!
 
This snowflake, like many, is growing on multiple planes. Identifying how this one forms is a bit of a challenge, but I have some theories. The most puzzling feature is the broad ends, and for the sake of this “deep dive”, let’s look at the lower-right branch.
 
The branch appears to be a ”capped ridge” as I explained a few days ago – a ridge running along the center of the snowflake that may have started growing outward on its own, independent of the branch underneath and creating a new plane for the crystal to grow on. This can be seen by the side-branches appearing to grow underneath it. The same kind of physics is likely at play with the broad outer end of the branch, causing both inward and outward crystal growth in some fun ways.
 
If the snowflake growth slows (lower humidity), the outer edges usually build up thicker rather than growing outward. This can create ridges along outer edges, which can in turn create a new layer of growth much the way capped columns grow into two separate plate-like crystals. This outer ridge then grew inward and filled in the branch, but also outward into the pointed tips you see at the very edges of the snowflake. In many areas of the crystal you will see this happening, creating two distinct planes of growth. Physics can be fun when you make it a game to try and figure out how a snowflake is formed!
 
Photographically, these broad branches work really well to fill as much of the frame with shining ice, while still presenting the entire snowflake tip-to-tip. The contrast plays along the outer edge and the inner pockets, and these lines are kept simple by the blockier branches and thereby easier for your eyes to follow. There are some reasons why certain snowflakes make better photographs; the answer isn’t simplicity, but rather well-defined lines that are easy to navigate.
 
There were 37 separate images combined in this snowflake, just shy of the average of 40 or so that I combine using focus-stacking techniques to get every bit of detail out of the crystal. I started on this image last night and completed it earlier today with a little over four hours of work. Thankfully I was able to catch up on the latest season of Dr. Who in the process. Editing snowflakes has become somewhat “muscle memory” for me, like I assume knitting could become. I can often divert some of my attention to a television show during the lengthy editing process, which helps me keep my sanity. :)
 
For more snowflake science and every photographic and editing technique required to make beautiful images like this, you need to grab a copy of Sky Crystals: https://skycrystals.ca/book/ - 304 pages dedicated to snowflakes, with far more text than you normally associate with books from photographers. Let this post be an example of the depth you’ll find!
 
If you’d like to dive deep into an image containing over 400 separate crystals all in relative size to one another, you should take a look at “The Snowflake”: https://skycrystals.ca/poster/ - nothing like this has ever been done before. 2500 hours in the making!
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded