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Longleat is an exceptional place. Not only is it one of the greatest Tudor stately homes in Britain, it is also the world's first drive through Safari Park outside Africa, operating since 1966. It has numerous other attractions, including a fantastic labyrinth, made up of some 16,000 yews and a high-tech motion simulator. This unique combination of historical, natural and modern entertainment make Longleat compete with Europe's best theme parks.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/longleat.shtml
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The monoliths of Stonehenge, 13km northwest of Salisbury, are the oldest prehistoric monuments of Britain and some of the oldest in the world. The word Stonehenge comes from the Old English words Stanhen gist, which mean 'hanging stones'.

Stonehenge has been designated Wolrd Heritage site by the UNESCO in 1986 and attracts some 700,000 visitors annually.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/stonehenge.shtml
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Burghley House (pronounced "Burlee") is one of the most sumptuous Elizabethan stately homes in Britain.

Constructed between 1555 and 1587, the house was designed by his first occupant, William Cecil, Lord High Treasurer to Queen Elizabeth I.

There are 35 major rooms and 80 lesser rooms, including the 18 grandiose State Rooms, with its Tudor Kitchen, George Rooms and Blue Silk Bedroom and Dressing Room.

The State Rooms contain one of the most important private collections of 17th century Italian paintings. One of the masterpieces is the Heaven Room and the Hell Staircase by Antonio Verrio. There are also works by Brueghel and Gainsborough, as well as tapestries, furniture, European porcelain and Japanese ceramics.

The park and gardens were designed by ’Capability’ Brown in the 18th century and part of it now include a contemporary sculpture park.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/burghley_house.shtml
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The twin towns of Windsor and Eton are located in Berkshire, just west of London's ring road.

Windsor is a must see on anyone's sightseeing list of Britain. While its enormous medieval stone castle is one of the official residences of the British royal family, Eton College is judged by many to be the country's most prestigious school.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/windsor.shtml
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Durham is the principal tourist city of North-East England. It is famous for its Norman Cathedral and 11th-century castle, both listed as UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Durham University, established in 1832, claims to be England's third oldest after Oxford and Cambridge. The Chancellor of the University is writer Bill Bryson, appointed by the University's Convocation on 4 April 2005. Tony Blair and Rowan Atkinson ("Mr Bean") both attended Chorister School in Durham (adjacent to the cathedral).

http://www.eupedia.com/england/durham.shtml
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Once one of the greatest port in the world, Liverpool is now the fourth largest conurbation in England (after London, Birmingham and nearby Manchester). The inhabitants of Liverpool are officially known as the "Liverpudlians", but more commonly known as "Scousers".

Few English cities have such a unique character as Liverpool. This could be due to the large influx of Irish and Scottish immigrants in past centuries, or to the very distinctive local accent, called Scouse, almost incomprehensible by most other speakers of English (in addition to the rising and falling tones, a word like "town" is pronounced "toon", "back" sounds like "bax", "technology" is "texnology" and "get" is "gerr").

Liverpool's past glories have come to an abrupt end after WWII, and the subsequent high unemployment and poor economic situation have made it a bastion of radical left-wing politics. But it is best known to the world as the city from where The Beatles originated.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/liverpool.shtml
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At the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss, York is the traditional county town of Yorkshire, and the most historically important city of Northern England.

York has over 2000 listed buildings and its famous York Minster and well preserved historical centre have made it a prime destination for visitors to England.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/york.shtml
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Bath is a Georgian spa town predominantly built of limestone, not unlike Oxford and Cambridge. It is one of England (and Europe)'s most attractive and tourist cities, and is listed by the UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/bath.shtml
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London is the capital of England and of the United Kingdom, the largest and most populous city in Europe, as well as the financial capital of Europe. London contributes to 17% of the UK's GDP and Inner London has the highest average salary of any European city.

The population of the historical City of London only has 7,800 inhabitants, although the Greater London has a population of 7,172,000, which is further extended to 13,945,000 for the metropolitan area. Of these 7 million people, 71% are Caucasians, 10% South Asians (Indian, Bangladeshi or Pakistani), 5% black African, 5% black Caribbean, 3% mixed race and 1% Chinese. 21.8% of inhabitants were born outside the European Union.

Politically, Greater London is divided into 32 boroughs and the City of London. The current mayor of London Ken Livingstone was elected as an independent candidate in 2000, and re-elected as a member of the Labour party in 2004.

Although the City of London is the historical heart of the city, the subsequent growth of Westminster as the seat of the monarchy and government shifted the official city centre to Charring Cross (in Westminster), just north of the major government offices of Whitehall.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/london.shtml
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Probably the most famous British city after London, Oxford is a small-scaled but immensely beautiful city. It is understandably inundated with tourists in summer.

Oxford University is one of the world's most prestigious academic institutions (along with its local rival, Cambridge), and is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. Countless celebrities are on the list of its alumni. Some of the most famous include, chronologically, John Locke, William Penn, Christopher Wren, Adam Smith, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lewis Carroll, Oscar Wilde, JRR Tolkien, Indira Gandhi, Margarett Thatcher, Bill Clinton, Aung San Suu Kyi, Rupert Murdoch, Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean), Michael Palin and Hugh Grant. All in all, Oxford has produced 47 Nobel prize-winners, 25 British Prime Ministers, 23 Presidents or non-British Prime Ministers, 6 saints, 86 Archbishops, 18 Cardinals and 1 Pope.

http://www.eupedia.com/england/oxford.shtml
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