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In this, the twelfth and last installment in our series on the Protestant Reformation, Fr. Coppens gives a brief but insightful account of the unsuccessful attempts to pervert Catholicism in Ireland and France, as well as the general mess left behind by the Reformers in the Netherlands.

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In these three short essays, the eleventh and penultimate installment in our series on Protestantism, Fr. Coppens recounts the sad fate of Catholics under the reign of Christian II, king of Denmark, Norway and Iceland.

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In this essay, the tenth in our series on Protestantism, Fr. Coppens explains how the errors of Martin Luther were intentionally imported to Sweden by Gustav Vasa for the purpose of eliminating all legitimate opposition to his tyrannical reign.

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In this essay, the ninth installment in our series on Protestantism, Fr. Coppens traces the spread of revolt and corruption which followed in the wake of John Knox, the founder of Presbyterianism in Scotland.

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In this essay, the eighth installment in our series on Protestantism, Fr. Coppens relates the brief restoration of English Catholicism under Mary and the brutal suppression it experience under Elizabeth I leading to the establishment of the Anglican Church.

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In this essay, the seventh installment in our series on Protestantism, Fr. Coppens recounts the events leading up to and immediately following upon Henry VIII's break with Rome.

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In this essay, the sixth in our Series on the Protestant Reformation, Fr. Coppens paints a vivid portrait of that other heresiarch of the age, John Calvin.

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In this essay, the fifth in our Series on the Protestant Reformation, Fr. Charles Coppens explores the origins of the Anabaptist heresy, and its largest surviving branch, the Baptist movement.

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In this essay, the fourth in our Series on the Protestant Reformation, Fr. Charles Coppens exposes the spiritual and intellectual corruption which Luther's heresy brought about in 16th century Germany.

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In this essay, the third in our Series on the Protestant Reformation, Fr. Charles Coppens explores the pretext, as well as the underlying spiritual and political factors, which led to Martin Luther's revolt.
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