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Off-the-Shelf, Power-Generating Clothes Are Almost Here

A lightweight, comfortable jacket that can generate the power to light up a jogger at night may sound futuristic, but materials scientist Trisha Andrew at the University of Massachusetts Amherst could make one today. In a new paper this month, she and colleagues outline how they have invented a way to apply breathable, pliable, metal-free electrodes to fabric and off-the-shelf clothing so it feels good to the touch and also transports enough electricity to power small electronics.

http://www.umass.edu/newsoffice/article/shelf-power-generating-clothes-are-almost
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Color-shifting electronic skin could have wearable tech and prosthetic uses

The ability of some animals, including chameleons, octopus, and squid, to change their skin colour for camouflage, temperature control, or communication is well known.

While science has been able to replicate these abilities with artificial skin, the colour changes are often only visible to the naked eye when the material is put under huge mechanical strain.

Now, however, researchers in China have developed a new type of user-interactive electronic skin, with a colour change perceptible to the human eye, and achieved with a much-reduced level of strain. Their results could have applications in robotics, prosthetics and wearable technology.

http://ioppublishing.org/news/colour-shifting-electronic-skin-could-have-wearable-tech-and-prosthetic-uses/
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Modius headset for Weight Loss

MODIUS is cutting edge technology developed by neuroscientists at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) which works by sending a signal to the part of the brain that controls fat storage, naturally shifting your metabolism to burn more fat.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/modius-groundbreaking-fat-reduction-technology-fitness-health#/

Neurovestibular Stimulation in 90 seconds:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlZE2rtFpZA
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Breathable, wearable electronics on skin for long-term health monitoring

A hypoallergenic electronic sensor can be worn on the skin continuously for a week without discomfort, and is so light and thin that users forget they even have it on, says a Japanese group of scientists. The elastic electrode constructed of breathable nanoscale meshes holds promise for the development of noninvasive e-skin devices that can monitor a person's health continuously over a long period.

https://phys.org/news/2017-07-breathable-wearable-electronics-skin-long-term.html
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Soft and stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable robots

Wearable technologies – from heart rate monitors to virtual reality headsets – are exploding in popularity in both the consumer and research spaces, but most of the electronic sensors that detect and transmit data from wearables are made of hard, inflexible materials that can restrict both the wearer’s natural movements and the accuracy of the data collected. Now, a team of researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has created a highly sensitive soft capacitive sensor made of silicone and fabric that moves and flexes with the human body to unobtrusively and accurately detect movement.

https://wyss.harvard.edu/soft-and-stretchy-fabric-based-sensors-for-wearable-robots/
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KYOCERA Optical Blood-Flow Sensor is Among World’s Smallest for Wearable Devices, Smartphones

Devices equipped with this new sensor will be able to measure blood-flow volume in subcutaneous tissue by placing the device in contact with an ear, finger or forehead. When light is reflected on blood within a blood vessel, the frequency of light varies — called a frequency or Doppler shift — according to the blood-flow velocity. The new sensor utilizes the relative shift in frequency (which increases as blood flow accelerates) and the strength of the reflected light (which grows stronger when reflected off a greater volume of red blood cells) to measure blood-flow volume.

http://global.kyocera.com/news/2016/1205_nvid.html
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MIT researchers invent clothes that breathe with the help of biological cells

MIT researchers have invented a new type of workout material that can breathe using biological cells. The project, called bioLogic, is essentially a “breathable workout suit” covered in small flaps. The flaps are “lined with live microbial cells that shrink and expand in response to changes in humidity” allowing the entire outfit to act as a reactive sensor to let athletes cool off as needed.

https://techcrunch.com/2017/05/24/mit-researchers-invent-clothes-that-breathe-with-the-help-of-biological-cells/

http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/biologic/
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Ultraviolet light sensor for wearable devices in the IoT era

In recent years, there's been growing interest within the healthcare community in the prevention of sunburns and skin blemishes. As such, easy measurement of UV light through the use of a smartphone or a wearable device could be of great benefit to healthcare and aesthetic medicine.

http://www.tohoku.ac.jp/en/press/ultraviolet_light_sensor.html
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This contact lens could someday measure blood glucose and other signs of disease

Transparent biosensors embedded into contact lenses could soon allow doctors and patients to monitor blood glucose levels and many other telltale signs of disease from teardops without invasive tests, according to Oregon State University chemical engineering professor Gregory S. Herman, Ph.D. who presented his work Tuesday April 4, 2017 at the American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meeting & Exposition.

http://www.kurzweilai.net/this-contact-lens-could-someday-measure-blood-glucose-and-other-signs-of-disease
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Mass production of low-cost, flexible 3-D printed electronics

A group of researchers at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Germany and INRS-EMT in Canada is paving the way for mass-producing low-cost printable electronics by demonstrating a fully inkjet-printable flexible resistive memory.

http://www.kurzweilai.net/mass-production-of-low-cost-flexible-3-d-printed-electronics
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