Post has attachment
Exploring legal personhood for U.S. rivers. Hey, if corporations have it, why not natural systems?
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
New Netflix movie, Okja uses a "Mutant Super Pig" to display capitalism, consumption and industrial slaughterhouses.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Solar is Cheapest Energy in Some Part of World


In the last year, according to Naam, we’ve seen crossover in the solar power market. In the sunniest parts of the world, unsubsidized solar is becoming the cheapest form of energy.

In the US, natural gas is the cheapest energy at around five or six cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). A deal in Palo Alto, California late last fall was signed for 3.6 cents per kWh (5.1 cents removing subsidies, according to Naam). A deal signed in India was less than the price of coal there. No subsidies. In Chile, solar bids won a dozen auctions, one of which was the lowest we had yet seen at 2.9 cents a kWh.

“Now, that was not just the cheapest price for solar ever assigned, that was the cheapest unsubsidized contract for electricity of any sort on planet Earth with any technology ever in history,” Naam says.

That record lasted for about a month, when a deal in Dubai was signed for 2.4 cents a kWh—less than half US natural gas prices and lower than natural gas in the Middle East or Africa.

“And it wasn't just one company with an unusually aggressive bid,” Naam says. “There were four companies that came with bids of less than three cents in this auction.”

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Life is a tree: a Tree of Life.

Our new, radial, view of it is simply looking down from the top, rather than from our branch.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
When Politics Is Really Out of Touch

In every congressional district, a majority of adults supports limiting carbon dioxide emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. But many Republicans in Congress (and some Democrats) agree with President Trump, who this week may move to kill an Obama administration plan that would have scaled back the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Nationally, about seven in 10 Americans support regulating carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants — and 75 percent support regulating CO2 as a pollutant more generally. But lawmakers are unlikely to change direction soon.

Bob Inglis, a former Republican congressman from South Carolina, warned that committed activists — like the Tea Party — can shape politicians’ approaches to issues like climate change. “Those are the ones who can take you out at the next primary,” he said. Mr. Inglis lost his primary in 2010 to Trey Gowdy, a Tea Party candidate who attacked his climate views.

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Trump's polarity in opposing climate action is creating an equal and opposite reaction. A great read by +Alex Steffen​.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Policymakers are already seeing this inconvenient truth as a reason to put the brakes on renewable energy. In parts of Europe and China, investment in renewables is slowing as subsidies are cut back. However, the solution is not less wind and solar. It is to rethink how the world prices clean energy in order to make better use of it.
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Basically, it amounts to a change of paradigms from seeing the world as a machine to understanding it as a network, or rather as networks within networks — biological, ecological, and social networks. Wherever we see life, we see networks. Now, a network, as everybody knows, is a particular pattern of links, of relationships. So, to understand networks, we need to learn how to think in terms of relationships. This is what “systems thinking,” or “systemic thinking” is all about: thinking in terms of relationships, patterns, and context.

HT +Simon Robinson
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Battery Storage Starting to Scale

But prices for lithium-ion batteries have fallen fast—by almost half just since 2014. Electric cars are largely responsible, increasing demand and requiring a new scale of manufacturing for the same battery cells used in grid storage. California is mandating that its utilities begin testing batteries by adding more than 1.32 gigawatts by 2020. For context, consider this: In 2016, the global market for storage was less than a gigawatt.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Yeah, uh, we're talking about sudden, rising sea levels - about 4 inches.

Boom.

Ugh.

Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded