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Welcome to my Collection about Hymenoptera!
 
Here you'll find all kinds of hymenoptera: that means bees, wasps ("regular" ones, but also many parasitoids), sawflies... just no ants, because they are cool enough to get their own Collection.
 
If you found this collection because it's featured (or otherwise): thank you so much for checking it out, I hope you'll enjoy it!
 
As a brief introduction in this pinned post, let me just take the time to say that I'm a simple amateur photographer; I started out with borrowed equipment and have steadily improved my gear to get to my current setup. Practice, of course, is the most important aspect, as well as interaction with everyone else. I love to talk about my shots!
That said, I think it is only fair to expect others to treat photographers with respect - a lot of effort went into making these pictures... Therefore, if you feel like sharing this work with others: please use the reshare function and do not download and re-post.

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Oviposition
 
Remember that I said Nasonia is a fly parasitoid? Well this is her in action. The female was is attacking the pupae of a blue bottle fly, drilling a small hole with her ovipositor (the bit that becomes the sting in yellow jackets, for example). After drilling, she can lay a clutch of eggs inside.
In this case, the wasp lays her eggs in the space between the dark brown puparium and the developing fly pupae inside. So, technically, even though to us it seems as if she is laying her eggs inside, the wasp is actually an ectoparasite ('ecto-' meaning 'outside'). Many other parasitoids would be endoparasites, for example the Cotesia wasps that lay eggs inside caterpillars.
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Is it working now?
 
 
"Hi miss, I heard you've been having problems with you antenna? Could you show me what the issue is?"
 
When all else fails, you can always call the cable guys. Interesting career choice for a tiny Trichogramma wasp though...
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Bad reception
 
 
This Nasonia wasp must be getting a bad signal. Go ahead waspy, maybe straightening your antenna will help!
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Waiter! There's a wasp in my soup
 
Oh no.. While the wasp I shared yesterday was host feeding, a silly Trichogramma wasps wandered on this pupa and fell into the nice heamolymph drop that the Nasonia was drinking.
 
Silly Tricho!
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Host feeding
 
A shot of one of my babies: the awesome parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis
These small critters parasitize the pupae of flies, in which they lay their eggs. But first, prospective moms drill a small hole in the puparium and (apparently) wound the developing pupa. Then they drink some of the nutrient rich heamolymph - the blood of the fly. This process is known as host feeding, and helps to prepare wasp eggs.
 
This was shot in the lab, in front of a blue background for added contrast.
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Juicy
 
Enjoy some sweet apple juice and celebrate #WaspWednesday, just like this Vespula germanica wasp did last year.
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Poke poke
 
Here we have a sawfly, doing what it's known for: sawing. These odd Hymenopterans use their saw-like ovipositor to saw through the edge of leaves and deposit eggs inside. Often, many of their caterpillar-like larvae develop on the same leaf.
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Enjoying some soda
 
In this re-edited and re-shared shot from earlier last year, a Common Wasp (Vespula vulgaris)—and many of her sisters—were very happy with this discarded soda can!
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End of the year
 
Is it time to chew over a leaf already?
 
 
(Sawfly larva)
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