Profile

Cover photo
Kevin Reid
Works at Google
Attended Clarkson University
239 followers|63,304 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
via Making Light
In the 1930s and 1940s, decades after steam engines had made wind power obsolete, Dutch researchers obstinately kept improving the – already very sophisticated – traditional windmill. The results were spectacular, and there is no doubt that today an army of ecogeeks could improve them even further. Would it make sense to revive the industrial windmill and again convert kinetic energy directly into mechanical energy? The Netherlands had 5 times mo...
1
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
+Ihab Awad 
Flying has become a routine, nothing out of the ordinary. Most people can’t tell one plane from another. This article sh…
2
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
“This reminds me of a silly idea I had when I was younger. It’s about Star Wars (of course). Specifically it’s about a possible rule—or design principle—underlying the kitbashed used-universe design of that galaxy far, far away.”
I have a bad feeling about this.
1
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 

...in your browser.
Motion sensing using the doppler effect. Recently I stumbled upon an interesting paper for implementing motion sensing requiring no special hardware, only a speaker and mic! Unfortunately the paper didn't include code to test it, so I decided to reproduce it here on the web!
3
10
Randell Jesup's profile photoAdam Bliss's profile photoKurt Dresner's profile photoEshetie Liku's profile photo
 
i love the idea. so ingenious :)
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
While on a training flight, these guys were a couple thousand feet above a 787 being vectored just above the cloud layer an leaving a line of wake turbulence behind.

Photo from Scott Gordon 
3
2
Michael Mol's profile photoTynan Garrett's profile photo
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
My interactive presentation on digital signal processing is now available on the web. Annoy your neighbors whistling into your microphone!

More details, source code, etc. at the site.

Crosspost: <http://kpreid.livejournal.com/52068.html>
A Visual Introduction to DSP for SDR. This is an animated slide deck providing a tour of digital signal processing topics relevant to implementation of software-defined radios, focusing on building visual/geometric intuition for signals. Topics covered: Complex (IQ) and analytic signals.
3
3
Michelle Thompson's profile photoIhab Awad's profile photoRaiford Storey's profile photoPeter Jensen's profile photo
2 comments
 
looking forward to it! 
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
239 people
ABUBAKAR SHOLA's profile photo
Rob Long's profile photo
moroplogo -mrplgo's profile photo
Akanksha Vyas's profile photo
Tad Morgan's profile photo
Chris Sethi's profile photo
Jerome Etienne's profile photo
Christian Mesh's profile photo
William Brayton's profile photo

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Kenning contraption

robot: anthropomorphic automaton
songbird: arboreal artist
storybook: amazing adventure
textbook: authoritative algebra
birdhouse: architectural aviary
chemistry: academic alchemy
tin: antique aluminum
bronze: archaeological alloy
neon: amber ambiance
divide: antagonistic arithmetic

The program word2vec [1] turns words from a corpus of text into vectors living in a vector space of a few hundred dimensions.  The idea behind the program is to think of each word as a collection of attributes that can be added to and subtracted from each other; for instance, the KING - MALE is very close to MONARCH and MONARCH + FEMALE is very close to QUEEN.

My brother +Douglas Summers-Stay took a list of words he wanted definitions for, then found the nearest vectors that were the sum of an adjective and a noun both starting with the letter "a".

Because the vectors are word-based instead of context-based, it can't tell the difference between all the meanings of a word, so the results often end up punning on all the meanings.

[1] https://code.google.com/p/word2vec/
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
1
Glenn Hoffman's profile photo
 
Love it! Such attention to detail.
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
“William Kahan orders a 14.625 ounce coffee. He receives 15 ounces of coffee in a 16 ounce cup. He complains that the error is greater than one gulp.”

“Nick Bostrom walks in and orders coffee that has successfully passed through the Great Filter.”

— from the comments
I have been really enjoying literarystarbucks.tumblr.com, which publishes complicated jokes about what famous authors and fictional characters order at Starbucks. I like it so much I wish I knew mo...
3
Walter Connor's profile photo
 
Dude.
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
(via a coworker)
In tribute to sci-fi author Iain M. Banks, SpaceX founder Elon Musk names two of his drone ships after ships from Banks' Culture novels.
1
Add a comment...

Kevin Reid

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
And the award for most mind-boggling compiler optimisation ever goes to ..... Matthias Grimmer and Chris Seaton!

One problem people have when trying to speed up fundamentally slow scripting languages like Python and Ruby is that because the original implementations are so lethargic, people often rewrite parts in C to try and speed core things up. But these C extensions usually just plug straight into the original interpreter, making it difficult for anyone to ever do a better engine than the original because nobody can afford to rewrite all the extensions. It's like a tarpit of slow.

From the blog post:

"Our new solution in JRuby+Truffle is pretty radical - we're going to interpret the C source code of your extension. As we'll explain, JRuby+Truffle with an interpreter for C extensions is actually faster than running compiled C extensions using MRI!"

And they aren't kidding. Rewriting from Ruby to a C extension for some image processing tasks gets a 10x speedup. Going from Ruby to JRuby+Graal+interpreted C extension gets a 35x speedup! Of course it's not really interpreting C. It's actually doing a Java-style just in time cross language profile guided compile of the C/Ruby mix, on top of the actual HotSpot JVM, meaning that amongst other tricks ... it can actually inline both languages into each other at the machine code level! And it's benefiting from the 20+ years of performance research that has gone into the JVM.

Doing whole program optimisation across a dynamic scripting language and C on top of the JVM has to be the wildest mashup of programming technologies I've seen for years. Congrats to both of these mad scientists!
Very High Performance C Extensions For JRuby+Truffle. Matthias Grimmer and Chris Seaton, 27 October 2014. Ruby and C. C extensions are a big part of the Ruby ecosystem. They allow people to write Ruby programs to include C code for a variety of purposes. They may hope to make their Ruby program ...
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
239 people
ABUBAKAR SHOLA's profile photo
Rob Long's profile photo
moroplogo -mrplgo's profile photo
Akanksha Vyas's profile photo
Tad Morgan's profile photo
Chris Sethi's profile photo
Jerome Etienne's profile photo
Christian Mesh's profile photo
William Brayton's profile photo
Education
  • Clarkson University
    Computer Science, 2010 - 2012
Contact Information
Home
Email
Work
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2012 - present
  • Google
    Software Engineering Intern, 2011 - 2011
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Dating, Networking
Relationship
Single
Other names
kpreid
Links
YouTube
Contributor to