Profile

Cover photo
Marcin Rataj (lidel)
267,738 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
Pulling the plug on G+

This profile is left for archival and personal purposes.
There will be no new public posts.

Take care.
9

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
"A company that was the cheerleader of the open web is rapidly turning its back on every single open standard they once championned."
Entrepreneur. Software engineer. Building the future of cloud @comodit. Architect of @storytlr and @onesocialweb. Worked at Vodafone, BCG. Subscribe. Subscribe in a reader. Contact. Email: laurent@eschenauer.be Voicemail: +1 (415) 894-0312. Bitcoin TipJar. Send me a BTC payment. My playlist ...
3
1
Jacek W's profile photo
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
Upon seeing this, the novice was enlightened.
3
1
Alexander Nikitin's profile photo
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
Deutsche Bank has released a report concluding that the cost of unsubsidized solar power is about the same as the cost of electricity from the grid in India and Italy, and that by 2014 even more countries will achieve solar “grid parity.” -- http://worldbusiness.org/solar-achieves-grid-parity/
2
3
Jacek W's profile photoJanus Zudnik's profile photo
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The scientists wound up with 104 past studies that met their criteria. Then they amalgamated those studies’ results and, using sophisticated statistical calculations, determined just how much stretching impeded subsequent performance.
The numbers, especially for competitive athletes, are sobering."
1
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Google defends dropping chat federation with inaccurate and misinformed comments on the underlying protocol (XMPP) and blaming others for not joining.

Apparently, all the of the (good) sentiments behind the reasons for choosing XMPP as the protocol for Google Talk (https://developers.google.com/talk/open_communications) are no longer the driving force behind the decision making regarding its replacement Google Hangouts. All that talk about Client Choice, Service Choice and Platform Choice has been replaced with "if the other big players don't play, why should we?". So all those "thousands of other ISPs, universities, corporations and individual users" Google Talk used to federate with are no longer important.

On top of that, XMPP is blamed for not keeping up with the times:

"When XMPP was designed, smartphones and social networks didn't exist. Yet both trends essentially transformed communication but the standard remains unchanged. For example, mobile has several requirements around bandwidth and battery that are simply not part of the standard. And audio and video integration are not well defined," [a Google spokesperson] said.

This glances over the the fact that the X in XMPP stands for eXtensible, which still results in proposals for new protocol extensions every month. The XMPP Council, which I am currently serving on, watches over XMPP extensions in the XEP series (http://xmpp.org/xmpp-protocols/xmpp-extensions/) of the XMPP Standards Foundation. However, as XMPP is built on distributed technologies, everyone can invent their own protocol extensions in private, too. Something that Google should be fully aware of, as they have created a bunch of their own protocol additions, of which some are documented here: https://developers.google.com/talk/jep_extensions/extensions.

To go into even more depth, at various times, battery and bandwidth constraints for mobile use, have been discussed within the XMPP community at several times, since at least in 2008 and possibly before, with protocol proposals like Roster Versioning (XEP-0273, now part of RFC 6121), SIFT (XEP-0273) and background information on XMPP on Mobile Devices (XEP-0286).

Meanwhile, Google never participated in any of these discussions (https://plus.google.com/116276248303121270590/posts/V7LzUzj8R4D). Instead, they invented their own protocol (google:queue) for delayed presence delivery, much like but slightly simpler than what SIFT proposes. Had Google just participated, that protocol had likely been remade into a true XEP, for broader use in the community. This would have prevented, for example, Facebook, from also creating its own protocol for the same thing (https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=38943).

Of course none of these concerns for mobile are applicable for server federation. As far as I know, the Google Talk client on Android doesn't even use XMPP as the client-to-server protocol.

Google did cooperate with the XMPP community on standardizing Jingle (http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0166.html), a suite of protocol extensions for initiating and managing peer-to-peer media sessions between two XMPP entities. Ironically, this includes *audio and video integration", the very thing Google now says is not well defined, where Google was by far the largest driver behind it. And then Google Talk also never fully implemented the standardized protocol, causing other implementations to add custom, non-standard, workarounds.


Likewise, there are several proposals and even IETF drafts (for enhancing network security, including spam prevention, that Google didn't bother to implement. As an example, whereas as many other server operators would have wanted to start verifying X509 certificates on the TLS encrypted connections between servers, Google still doesn't check certificates or serve up properly signed ones themselves, allowing rogue servers to come in play.

The XMPP community even tried to accommodate some of the harder issues with serving up proper certificates for large numbers of hosted domains, explicitly including Google Talk, resulting in this IETF draft: http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-saintandre-xmpp-dna-02.

From personal experience with building federated social networks on top of XMPP at Mediamatic Lab, I can name several other protocols that would benefit some of the newer features in Google Hangouts, including Publish-Subscribe (XEP-0060) and the related Personal Eventing Protocol (XEP-0163), that Google just ignored.

How didn't the standard (XMPP) change again?

As +Peter Saint-Andre was quoted in the TechHive article, we will just move forward.
Google is feeling the heat over its decision to build its new Hangouts IM and audio/video chat product with proprietary technology that doesn't support server federation via the XMPP industry standard, but the company is defending its move. Specifically, Google maintains that XMPP (Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol) industry support is weak, which dilutes its purpose as a common protocol, and that its technology hasn't kept up with the...
62 comments on original post
4
1
Jacek W's profile photo
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
"These changes represent a switch from open protocols to proprietary ones [...] We're frustrated and disappointed to see Google take these steps"
1
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
"Recently, Google announced their decision to shut down Google Reader. This latest step in opposition to an open Internet in favour of Google+ has led me to a decision of my own. It's time to expunge Google from my life, to the fullest extent practical.

It's not because Google chose to shut down a free service they were offering, or because of privacy concerns. It's because I think that Google is now working against the potential of the open Internet, and because I think that one gets a better product when one is the customer as well as the user."
2
1
Alexander Nikitin's profile photo
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why Your IT Project Might Be Riskier Than You Think
by Bent Flyvbjerg, Alexander Budzier
http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.0265
1
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
"We present a method for non-invasive functional linkage of brain activity between human volunteers and Sprague–Dawley rats. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of computer-mediated interfacing of the neural signals between human and animal to generate simple motor responses."
2
1
Paweł Płazieński's profile photo
Add a comment...

Marcin Rataj

Shared publicly  - 
 
"For China and India specifically, the changes were even more significant. While the number of lights in both countries increased by 20 percent, the lighted area expanded by a whopping 270 percent. (China’s increase came later than in India.)"
1
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
How I learned to stop worrying and love converting oxygen into carbon dioxide
Introduction
Google+ is not the home page you're looking for.
Bragging rights
I was on G+ before it was Pinterest and left before it became Myspace.
Basic Information
Other names
lidel
Work
Occupation
BDSM of IT
Links
Contributor to