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Julian Harris
13,707 followers -
Passionate about software design, music and photography
Passionate about software design, music and photography

13,707 followers
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Holy Pollywogs this is amazing speech to text!
To deliver a truly human-like voice, a TTS system must learn to model the collection of expressive factors of speech, such as intonation, stress, and rhythm. Learn about some new research into expressive speech synthesis with Tacotron that aims to do this.
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[London] I'm super excited to announce a new position in my team. It's an amazing chance I wish I myself had at the beginning of my career. The successful candidate will work directly with me and the rest of my team to help provide insanely great strategic insight that will influence thinking of senior decision-makers in companies the world over.

https://angel.co/cognitionx/jobs/346882-junior-ai-nlp-chatbot-analyst-technical-research-team?utm_campaign=talent&utm_content=promote_jobs_box-listing&utm_medium=al_tweet&utm_source=twitter&utm_term=cognitionx
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What are people finding uniquely valuable any Google+ over other networks?
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Regarding North Korea:

A nuclear weapon can be classified by several largely-independent traits. For instance:

* Yield
* Range
* Prep time
* Strike time
* Interceptability
* Accuracy
* Reliability
* Observability

A 15 kiloton device -- an atomic firecracker by today's standards -- put on a delivery device with enough range to hit your target, a two-minute prep time, a thirty-minute strike time, low interceptability, 100-meter accuracy, that's 90% reliable, and which gives no warning until the double flash of atomic dawn, is a pants-wetting horror to the international community. If you have that, literally nobody will care that your nuke design is straight out of 1945 and isn't even boosted. If you laugh at it and say, "I bet it doesn't even have a levitated pit!", the serious professionals will give you serious looks until you realize you should seriously shut up.

By comparison, a megaton device which steadily fails every other criteria isn't a problem. When the U.S. detonated the first H-bomb, the Soviet nuclear community had a good laugh at us. Ivy Mike (the bomb's name) was an 82-ton scientific apparatus with a support crew of thousands. It was so large it was housed in a series of buildings on the Enewetak atoll. (The bomb itself was in a single building, but there were others on the island supporting bomb operations.) The Soviets weren't at all threatened by Ivy Mike because we had zero ability to use it as a weapon. "Sure, ten megatons, very nice. But what can you do with it?"

When the Soviets demonstrated their first H-bomb, the RDS-6 (aka "Joe-4"), the U.S. tried to downplay it: "It's only 400 kilotons! Ivy Mike was 25 times the yield!" And the Soviets answered, "400 kilotons of air-droppable bomb beats 10 megatons the Americans would have to build in your backyard."

The international community judged the Soviets the winner of that exchange.

What's the relevance to North Korea? Well, our news media is breathlessly going on about how they've tested a device at about 100 kilotons of yield and how that's such a breakthrough for them. But by now you know that yield is only a very small part of what goes into a nuclear weapon.

* Yield: NK, ~100 kt. US, 475 kt.
* Range: NK, 1500 mi. US, worldwide. NK's ICBM program isn't there yet: they haven't mastered the art of re-entry.
* Prep time: NK, unknown, likely multiple hours. US keeps ICBMs on a 2-minute standby.
* Strike time: NK, ~30 minutes. US, it's delivered to your door in under 30 minutes or your next one's free.
* Interceptability: NK, okay: our theater defense works okay against non-ICBMs, call it 50/50 and pick 'em. US: none -- NK has no capability to stop our incoming
* Accuracy: NK, "we would be happy to hit Guam". US, "we're joking about delivering it to your door, but we'll probably land near your mailbox."
* Reliability: NK, extremely low. US, pretty solid.
* Observability: both NK and US are closely watched for missile launches

NK is a very serious concern right now, yes. But it's not anywhere near as bad as you're being led to believe. Breathe deeply and remember that to be a serious threat to us, NK would have to dramatically improve its performance across the board.

There's still a little time for diplomacy. Let's use it.
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Today's data collectors are tomorrow's winners. #ai #machine-learning
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If you had a day in the week when you had nothing else to do (no work, family, school) what would you do?
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What do you think will be different about how software is designed and built in 2020?
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+Malte Ubl congrats on the new G+. Your underlying JS pieces have completely transformed the experience. "G+" and "Snappy". Never thought I'd say them in the same sentence.
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Kiwi tech people: anyone interested in a DevOps conference in NZ or know who might be interested? A mate is looking to organise it.
+Richard Vowles
+Mark Derricutt
+Mark Norman
+Lukas Svoboda
+Adrian Krzyzewski
+David Gladstone
+Karl Leaning
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