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Hugo Barbosa
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A random guy from Portugal who enjoys reading, movies, blogging and playing games.
A random guy from Portugal who enjoys reading, movies, blogging and playing games.

62 followers
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Here's the situation:

In Francia, Earl Robert leads part of the army against the Château du Sable Noir, a strategic point guarding a route that Arthur needs to flank the Roman Army. Count Otto is holed up inside the castle and two other counts are within two day's march from the place so reinforcements are on their way.

At a certain point, Otto sends his champion to challenge one of the player-knights. Unbeknownst to everyong, this champion is Otto's daughter, Lady Rotrude. No one knows she is a woman as she's using a closed helm but at a certain point, the player knight will become aware he's fighting a woman.

What do you think happens next? What would be interesting in this situation? Why did Otto send a woman to fight? Was he wounded during the siege and Rotrude took command of the army? What happens when everyone finds out she's a woman?

Reading 13th Age. I was never a fan of d20 in its iterations (D&D, Pathfinder) but I'm really enjoying this one. One thing confuses me, and I'll use the Barbarian as an example:

At level 1, you choose three talents from the Barbarian's list. Let's say I choose Barbaric Cleave, Slayer and Whirlwind. Now, under each Talent there are three feats (Adventurer, Champion and Epic).

Does this mean, I automatically receive the Adventurer feat of each chosen Talent or is it just one Feat (among the three Talents) according to the table on page 43?

As a result of random family event during the Winter Phase, there are rumors that one of the Player-Knight's relatives is a heretic. Need ideas for this situation. Doesn't have to be a fully fledged adventure. Random ideas are good to spark creativity.

Somehow this appeared in another thread somewhere else: AD&D's appendix N, the list of Gygax's inspirations for his game. Tolkien is in there, but most of it is from the Swords & Sorcery and Weird Tales variety. In an interview, Gygax stated that the most IMMEDIATE inspirations were Camp & Pratt, REH, Leiber, Vance, HPL and Merritt. Tolkien doesn't make it to this smaller list. What are the supposed Tolkien inspirations that shaped AD&D besides the races of humans and demi-humans and the adventuring party trope with those races? How much S&S / sci-fi / weird tales served as inspiration?

*SPOILER ALERT FOR MY PLAYERS LURKING HERE*
Situation: A Knight has a female child born from a fairy (elf). She takes the child to the player-knights castle and asks him to take care of her as his own (he's already married) until she's adult and then marry his daughter to a person of noble lineage.
What I need: Reasons and explanations for this. Anything and everything. Ideas will pop up eventually.

POSSIBLE SPOILERS (PLAYER KEEP AWAY)

What possible situations can arise where a PK's Modest trait of 16 is sorely tested? Ideas for court, adventure, battle, etc. are greatly appreciated.

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I love Pendragon because the rolls can create some crazy results. Here's another one for the ages:
504 AD, the saxons of Hantonne, fed up with the refusals of Salisbury to pay tribute, ally with the Sussex saxons and march into the county. An army of Somerset and Salisbury knights ride to meet them and they fight near Du Plain castle. Sir Robert, a player-knight, leads a batallion against the saxons, under the command of Sir Alain of Gloomvale, who leads the entire army.
And this is when things go from bad to good and heroic. There are three players (Sir Robert, Sir Nerovens and his squire, Aldwynn). Sir Robert leads a successful charge (critical Lance) against the saxons. But Sir Nerovens meets head on with a powerful Great Spear counter attack, his mortally wounded and thrown from his sell (Critical hit against him). Sir Robert orders everyone to disengage and regroup in a nearby hill whereupon they are besieged by enemy forces. While they try to resist, Aldwyn, the squire, tries to heal his lord, moved by his loyalty (successful use of Loyalty (Lord)). Alas, he fails to heal the knight (failed First Aid) who dies in his arms.
Enraged by this, Aldwyn picks his lord's shield and lance and throws himself into the fray (no armor). He confronts a powerful Saxon and delivers a powerful blow that sends the pagan crying for Wotan (successful Spear against a failing roll from the Saxon). Reinforcements arrive and it's an indecisive victory for both sides. Squire Aldwyn earned a name for himself and will surely make his next lord proud.
As for Sir Nevorens, the angels sing praise of his dutiful squire and he is surely happy in heaven.

Here's another one for the ages:
504 AD, the saxons of Hantonne, fed up with the refusals of Salisbury to pay tribute, ally with the Sussex saxons and march into the county. An army of Somerset and Salisbury knights ride to meet them and they fight near Du Plain castle. Sir Robert, a player-knight, leads a batallion against the saxons, under the command of Sir Alain of Gloomvale, who leads the entire army.
And this is when things go from bad to good and heroic. There are three players (Sir Robert, Sir Nerovens and his squire, Aldwynn). Sir Robert leads a successful charge (critical Lance) against the saxons. But Sir Nerovens meets head on with a powerful Great Spear counter attack, his mortally wounded and thrown from his sell (Critical hit against him). Sir Robert orders everyone to disengage and regroup in a nearby hill whereupon they are besieged by enemy forces. While they try to resist, Aldwyn, the squire, tries to heal his lord, moved by his loyalty (successful use of Loyalty (Lord)). Alas, he fails to heal the knight (failed First Aid) who dies in his arms.
Enraged by this, Aldwyn picks his lord's shield and lance and throws himself into the fray (no armor). He confronts a powerful Saxon and delivers a powerful blow that sends the pagan crying for Wotan (successful Spear against a failing roll from the Saxon). Reinforcements arrive and it's an indecisive victory for both sides. Squire Aldwyn earned a name for himself and will surely make his next lord proud.
As for Sir Nevorens, the angels sing praise of his dutiful squire and he is surely happy in heaven.

As it happens, one of my players created a squire because that was the most logical choice at this point in the campaign. He will be the squire of another player-knight and it will be several years before he reaches knighthood. We talked at length about this and we are comfortable with this course of action.

However, I did the math and I realized the squire will become a knight in 510AD which, as all GMs running TGPC know, this is the year Arthur draws the sword from the stone and becomes the boy king. Guess who will be knighted by Arthur if he lives that far?
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