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Michael James
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I've suspected for a while that student evaluations actually make me less effective.  Pfeffer's research suggests student evals "are likely to change the behaviors of presenters in ways that make learning and personal growth less likely."  Thiagi suggests optimizing for Level 4 feedback (results) instead.  What do you think?

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Michael James commented on a post on Blogger.
I was first impressed with Allen Holub at a JavaOne conference at least 15 years ago explaining the challenges of multithreading.  I'm pleased to see his attention on this issue today.

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http://lafable.com (Blocked by Twitter as un-SAFe!)

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Paradoxically, adding constraints can help break through other limitations.

Some constraints I've found useful to help Scrum teams change old habits:
* The team tries to build a [potentially] shippable product every Sprint, starting with the first Sprint.
* The Product Owner prioritizes.
* Clear goals are negotiated for each Sprint.
* The Sprint timebox.
* Full time participation.
* A team small enough that everyone can keep track of each other.
* No "my work" vs. "your work."
* We work together in a team room.
* Resolve team-internal issues within the team.

There are also rules the outer organization can follow to help this incubator work:
* Avoid interrupting Sprints.
* Avoid distracting team members, or splitting the across teams.
* Avoid tilting the team's pool table (by things like designating a particular team member a "lead").
* Avoid judging the team by anything other than its results every Sprint (e.g. no estimates vs. actuals).
* Support the Scrum Master in resolving external impediments.


Once a team or organization has internalized the mindset and habits of agility, I'm not sure they need the rules anymore, and (IMO) do not need to "do Scrum" by the book.  The organizations I work with and the people who come to my CSM classes are nowhere near that point though.

--mj
(Michael)

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