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Richard Clear
Works at Clear's Tai Chi
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Richard Clear

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Learn to build and use the primary energies of Tai Chi: Sung (softness,) Peng (ward off,) Lu (rollback,) Ji (press,) & An (push.)

These 5 principles are considered the foundation of Tai Chi.

In this video Sigung Clear breaks down these principles. You’ll learn how to build them and use them to add more power and effectiveness to all your Tai Chi skills and techniques.

20% off until Wed June 24th
20% off until Wed June 24th. Learn to build and use the primary energies of Tai Chi: Sung (softness,) Peng (ward off,) Lu (rollback,) Ji (press,) & An (push.) These 5 principles are considered the foundation of Tai Chi. In this video Sigung Clear breaks down these principles.
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Nice! I've been trying to apply internal principles in my Uechi-Ryu Karate. It's also Southern Kung-fu based style, and sparring begins with sticky hands. Thanks! 
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Richard Clear
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Wing Chun arm breaks.  These techniques are also used by Tai Chi and Ba Gua.   http://youtu.be/KsMd3zC9J04
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Here's a look at combining different types of spring power in Xing Yi.

Students start working on combining these after about 6 months of training.

The Xing Yi program closes tomorrow (friday)
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Gliding vs Mud Stepping

I was asked a question via email about the difference between sliding and gliding.  Following is my answer:

Gliding is for maneuvering.  
IMHO, You need and want gliding the most in any real situation.  

The sliding (mud stepping) is designed to help build body connection power and is important but will only be used briefly in a real situation as most of the time it is to slow to be used for real applications.  

Also, ideally, you learn how to use body power when gliding for the best of both worlds.  
                  In Kun Tao Silat we call this Floating Root.   :)
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Happy 4th of July Weekend!

Have fun & Be safe!
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Richard Clear

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Learn to build and use the primary energies of Tai Chi: Sung (softness,) Peng (ward off,) Lu (rollback,) Ji (press,) & An (push.)

These 5 principles are considered the foundation of Tai Chi.

In this video Sigung Clear breaks down these principles. You’ll learn how to build them and use them to add more power and effectiveness to all your Tai Chi skills and techniques.

20% off until Wed June 24th
20% off until Wed June 24th. Learn to build and use the primary energies of Tai Chi: Sung (softness,) Peng (ward off,) Lu (rollback,) Ji (press,) & An (push.) These 5 principles are considered the foundation of Tai Chi. In this video Sigung Clear breaks down these principles.
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Do your form while working to stay in the current moment. Not thinking about what you have already done and not thinking about what you are going to do. All of the focus is on what you are doing right now.
Most folks will get in a hurry through the form transitions and start thinking ahead. Instead enjoy the transition for each part of itself (into it, the change from into it to going back out of it and then going out of it).
For most folks this is much harder than it sounds. But, still great practice for discipline of the mind, body and spirit. 
Do your form while working to stay in the current moment.  Not thinking about what you have already done and not thinking about what you are going to do.  All of the focus is on what you are doing right now.  

Most folks will get in a hurry through the form transitions and start thinking ahead.  Instead enjoy the transition for each part of itself (into it, the change from into it to going back out of it and then going out of it).  

For most folks this is much harder than it sounds.  But, still great practice for discipline of the mind, body and spirit.  :)
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To focus on the moment is the key to contenement and also the key to avoiding distractions. Well said man! 
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I was sent the following message from a person looking for info and thought it would be worth posting here as to me the full answer to this could easily fill a heavy book:

I wanted to ask from your personal knowledge what is the difference between the xing i and the bagua vs the taichi? it always seemed to me that the xing i is the most direct in your face like wing chun and the bagua is half combat and more body movment , and the taichi is more health or chinna oriented.
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Masters and Methods is one of my favorite books! It's so inspiring - I reread every so often. A lot of people mention Tai Chi Touchstones as a terrific book but, frankly, I have trouble understanding a lot of the stuff in there. But I keep coming back to it. I guess when I'm ready... :-) As far as tai chi, I understood it to be a subset of qigong that is specifically for self-defense. If you want just the health benefits then, it's easier to just do qigong that is not for self-defense. But I like to "fight" :-)
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Training never reaches an end point. All a black belt really means is that you have "achieved" something not "become" something.

We are always in the process of becoming and along the way we are achieving. You are who you are today. Holding on to what was is an illusion. We can remember it fondly (if we so desire) and keep getting better or we can choose to stagnate and live in the past.

Like an apple. It is great today but next month it is great compost and no longer fit to eat in its current form.

As for me, each day I learn more new things and become who I am NOW. 
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Richard Clear

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Gliding vs Mud Stepping

I was asked a question via email about the difference between sliding and gliding.  Following is my answer:

Gliding is for maneuvering.  
IMHO, You need and want gliding the most in any real situation.  

The sliding (mud stepping) is designed to help build body connection power and is important but will only be used briefly in a real situation as most of the time it is to slow to be used for real applications.  

Also, ideally, you learn how to use body power when gliding for the best of both worlds.  
                  In Kun Tao Silat we call this Floating Root.   :)
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Aware, Ready & Responsive for Survival Against Surprise Attacks

I recently saw and posted a video on my Face Book group & page showing surprise knife attacks.  In almost every encounter the victim was either stabbed before they ever knew it was coming or they were simply to slow to react because they could not honestly believe that they were being lethally attacked.  

In the attacks where it took the victim awhile to believe, adjust and respond to the attack, the time it took for their mind to adjust to the situation was simply too long.  They were lethally stabbed before they could adjust.  Had they been able to “instantly” realize and adjust to and for the seriousness of the situation they might have survived.  There are a number of tricks for being aware and ready fast enough to survive this kind of situation.  I will cover a couple of them here.  

The first skill you must have to survive a lethal surprise attack is to train to be Aware of your surroundings.  Are you aware of what is going on around you when you are out in public?  For most people, unfortunately, the answer is no.  The immediate second thing to train is to be responsive and ready for whatever it is that you become aware of.  

Contemplate for a moment how you can do that.

At first it seems almost impossible to be immediately aware, ready and responsive to something that has not happened yet.  It is important to realize that even surprise attacks do not materialize out of thin air.  So, proper awareness followed by responsive action due to your readiness to take appropriate action can remove you from a bad situation before it fully develops.  This is pre-emptive and key to surviving a lethal surprise attack.   Even if the attack still happens, at least you are mentally as prepared as you can be and responding as fully as you can without the several second lag time (time that you simply do not have) if the attacker intends to severely harm or kill you.    

For me this skill came easily.  I grew up in very bad neighborhoods where you could be attacked at any time and you got used to being aware of that fact and responding appropriately by being aware, ready and responsive if something did start to happen.  

The question is:  How can someone train this.  Of course I teach it in my Street Self Defense Programs.
The next one here is July 8th, 2014 and I am working on a video for the program for those of you who are long distance.

 
How can you train this at home?
  
The best training is to learn and practice being aware of your surroundings for more than 30 feet away from you every time you are anywhere out in public where you could potentially be attacked.  This means not talking on the cell phone, ignoring your surroundings because you are talking with a friend, thinking about a good or bad experience you have had or are about to have such as a good or bad date, discussion, argument with someone or in any way being distracted from your immediate surroundings.  I think of it the same way that you want to be when driving at 60 miles per hour in heavy traffic.  If you ignore the traffic even for a moment then you will most like be in and the cause of a very bad accident.   

The other thing you can do is to train scenarios that involve an element of surprise in them or sparring with more than one person where your primary goal is to keep both attackers in front of you and learning to move in a way that does not let either one of them get behind you.  Of course your sparring partners are trying to flank you.  We do teach and train this in our programs.  This kind of sparring is involved and does require quite a bit of training to do well.  

Our Ba Gua does this quite a bit.   
You can watch my free videos on it here:       
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrNPUBAMZb8UzWNp8ngKf_cYBL_B_eSCg  
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