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London Canal Museum
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London Museum of Canals, Inland Waterways, the Victorian Ice trade
London Museum of Canals, Inland Waterways, the Victorian Ice trade

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In March we are looking forward to another British Science Week. For 17 years now we have welcomed a large number of schoolchildren to learn more about science through the resources of the museum and this year the theme will be "cool canals" as we tackle changing materials and insulators and ice!

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We're now closed for Christmas but we'll be open again on Wednesday. Over the holiday period we are open on 28th 29th and 30th December and on 1st and 2nd January. We are closed on 31st December.
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This weekend is the Amazing Halloween Experience with spooking tunnel boat trips, face-painting, story-telling, a cave of creepy things, lantern-making and decorations in the museum.

There are places still available on the boats. For updated availability summaries see http://facebook.com/canalmuseum and for details of the event see http://lcm.me.uk/hw and to book go to http://lcm.me.uk/bk
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We have opened booking for two roses and castles painting workshops on the second Sundays of November and December 2016. Running from 1030 to about 1615 with a lunch break, and coffee provided, these workshops led by Trish Parrott are for all levels of experience and beginners are welcome. Learn one of the oldest canal traditions. Details http://lcm.me.uk/rc 
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15/09/2016
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Our new exhibition "Turning 200 - Celebrating the Birth of The Regent's Canal is on from now until November.

Two hundred years ago the first section of The Regent's Canal opened from Paddington to Camden Town. This included a celebration on the Cumberland Arm which was a half mile branch to a canal basin near the present-day Euston Station. The exhibition Turning 200 celebrates this bicentenary and allows visitors to see how to trace the route of the lost Cumberland Arm today.

The museum's exhibition research team spent weeks uncovering the fascinating history of the lost Cumberland Arm. The exhibition tells some enthralling stories of lost industries; the rise and fall of the canal arm and its renewal as part of today's London.

The Cumberland Arm and Basin were just a stone's throw from the new West End of London, and both were both planned by the famous architect John Nash, who was a director of the canal company. Although planned to supply the surrounding aristocratic neighbourhood, the Cumberland Arm never fulfilled its potential. The Arm was not used by the railways when they arrived at nearby Euston, where this new transport technology was announced by the triumphal Euston Arch.

The Prince Regent gave his name - but not his money - to the venture. While the company struggled to raise the cash, he spent a quarter of the sum they needed on the tableware for his accession banquet. Then as the canal's fortunes declined and the neighbourhood became poorer, social reformers and artists arrived. Our exhibition highlights some amazing facts including how the basin was filled in with rubble from the blitz, and how a club for local working class girls became the epicentre of the revival in English folk dancing. Remarkably the land created was turned over to allotments which thrive to this day - probably the most central plots in London. Perhaps their continuing success is down to the legend that the topsoil came from Windsor Castle.
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Councillor Richard Cotton deputy Mayor of Camden cuts a cake celebrating the 200th anniversary of the opening of the first part of the Regent's Canal today.
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Today we celebrate the 200th anniversary of the opening of The Regent's Canal from Paddington to Camden Town and also the branch canal, now closed, to Cumberland Basin near the present - day Euston Station. The rest of the canal opened in 1820. The museum's exhibition "Turning 200" has started today to celebrate this and today our tug Bantam IV will be driving to Camden for a little celebration involving a cake! Two panels from the exhibition will be on board the tug.

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Ice Sunday today. Ice cream demonstrations using Victorian methods as well as descents into the ice Wells for fit adults and teenagers. 
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UNTIL 7TH AUGUST

In around 1906, Mr. W. M. Beal - we don't know his Christian name - took a series of photographs along the Thames and The Regent's Canal to illustrate a pair of "Lantern Lectures" that he gave around London.

Through London on a Monkey Boat was the title of one of these talks in the early years of the 20th Century. There was also a lecture on the River Thames. In 2012, 50 surviving glass slides were donated to the London Canal Museum, having been in family ownership for many years. There were originally more than 80 slides per lecture but the others are presumed lost.

We know little about Mr. Beal except that he was a regular lecturer in London, and a rather good photographer.

This exhibition reproduces 17 of the photographs. The pictures selected are mainly of people working on or near, or enjoying The Regent’s Canal. The pictures are notable for their portrayal of ordinary people, including the men and women who worked the boats. Before entering the museum collection, these remarkable pictures had probably not been seen in public for a century and this is the first time they have been printed in large format and exhibited, since they were taken 110 years ago. Most are remarkably clear and detailed and all of them show life as it was in Edwardian London.

Mr. Beal’s own description of his lecture was:

"A record of journeys on the Regent’s Canal from Paddington to Limehouse with description of the life, manners, and customs of workers and wanderers met by the way."
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Our popular tunnel boat trips are now available to book for the 2016 season. Operating on the second and fourth Sunday of each month, May to October inclusive, the trips depart from the London Canal Museum at 1100, 1200, 1400, 1500 and 1600. Capacity is limited so it is wise to book in advance and this can be done online. For more information about booking online please see http://www.canalmuseum.org.uk/book

Each tunnel boat trip is accompanied by a guide from the museum who will explain the history of the Islington Tunnel. It was built in 1816-20 and is three quarters of a mile long. The trip takes about 50 minutes, most of which is spent in the tunnel and all boats start from and return to the museum in King's Cross. The adult price is £8.40, the child price is £6.00, and admission to the museum is included so this is an economical package.

This is one of the most interesting boat trips available in London!
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