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Aikido Hawaii
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Shared resource for all Aikido students in Hawaii
Shared resource for all Aikido students in Hawaii

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Added the information for the May 27th - 28th 2017 Aiki Kai o Kona 29th Anniversary with Gayne Sogi and Randy Scoville to the seminar news page.




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The transcript of a question and answer session with Hawaii Ki Federation instructor Christopher Curtis at the 2017 Eastern Ki Federation Shugyo Tassei Kigan Shikki Seminar 

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Updated the schedule for the Lihue Aiki Kai 

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Kisshomaru Ueshiba Doshu in Hawaii - from Furyu Magazine, issue number 3.

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Aikido's Circle and Point: A Workshop Lecture by Doshu Ueshiba Kisshomaru

by Wayne Muromoto

Photo: Doshu Ueshiba Kisshomaru (right) demonstrates the theory of circularity and keeping to the center at the Waialae Dojo in Honolulu, Hawaii

Aikido movement is circular and has an axis. It is en (circular) and chuushin (with a center). This centering and holding fast is the purpose of not only the seika tanden (the 'one point' a few inches below the navel), but of chijo (all things above the earth); the universe. It is the circle of the universe. . ." So said Doshu Ueshiba Kisshomaru, the white-haired son of Ueshiba Morihei, the founder of aikido.

Doshu and his son Moriteru (the dojocho, or head of training) made his meaning clear in a series of workshops and demonstrations held at the Waialae Dojo in Honolulu, Hawaii. The two were in town in early September of this year, 1994, to help commemorate the 30th anniversary of the founding of the main dojo of the Hawaii Aikikai organization. At the opening celebrations of the dojo, Ueshiba (called O-sensei, or great teacher as a token of honor), for the only time in his life, ventured on American soil to consecrate the dojo. It was an epochal event, signifying Ueshiba's wish that aikido be shared throughout the world. That was 30 years ago.

As part of retracing his father's footsteps for a series of articles in the aikido magazine Tankyu (a Japanese-language publication), Ueshiba Kisshomaru took the opportunity of the anniversary to revisit Hawaii and reflect upon his father's legacy.

"The founder wanted to spread aikido's kokoro (spirit) through the world. And thus, he established a 'rainbow bridge' in Hawaii," Doshu said through interpreter Glen Yoshida, a fifth dan aikido instructor.

Aikido is not flashy and has no competition, yet it has enjoyed a great popularity in Japan and internationally. Doshu feels that it is because proper aikido stresses "the finer spiritual values." "Thus, we must do tadashii tanren ho (proper practice methods)," Doshu continues. "--That fills the spirit."

In this series of photographs, Ueshiba Moriteru demonstrates an application of the concept of circular movement in controlling, throwing and pinning his partner.

The basis of the proper movement, he says, is the theory of circular motion and a pivot point, or what Doshu calls en and ten (or chuushin).

"We train to be able to unite the universe with the earth in the spirit. . . so there is one movement. . . All movements are spherical but they must have a center point. When you develop the center point, the spirit of the universe becomes a part of you; not just a part of your body."

This feeling, Doshu says, is the working of shizen no nagare, or the "natural flow" of things, whether you do the technique quickly and with efficiency or slow and flowing, and it extends to other things you do besides aikido.

"If you don't stray from your own center, you can train with a variety of teachers. It's fine to say you prefer this or that teacher's style of aikido, but you must be able to adjust to whoever you're working with. That's aikido. It's important to grasp the feeling of the art (not just the technique). You grab hold of it a little at a time, day by day.

". . . In daily life, you may clash with others. If you understand en no ugoki (the movement of circularity), you may be able to subdue and minimize conflict. The founder said to use the strength of nature and naturalness. That is in circularity, but every circle must have a center. The center is the center of the earth."

Doshu, who had originally planned on leaving the training workshops up to his son, was overjoyed at the turnout of students and gave the lecture/demonstration as a special treat for the gathered disciples of aikido.

"--And what should I finally leave with you?" he asked rhetorically. Ueshiba Kisshomaru answered his own question easily and, in a true aikido way, to the point. "I would be very pleased if you could simply go back to your teachers and practice diligently."
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Yasuo Kobayashi with Kazuo Igarashi and the late Robert Kubo (Aikido Hawaii International) at the 2008 Meiji University gasshuku in Hawaii. More from Kobayashi Sensei in this two part interview on the Aikido Sangenkai​ blog:

Part 1 - http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/interview-aikido-shihan-yasuo-kobayashi-part-1/
Part 2 - http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/interview-aikido-shihan-yasuo-kobayashi-part-2/


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Takashi Nonaka (center) with Koichi Tohei (left) and Shunichi Suzuki of Maui (right) in Honolulu, 1980's (photo courtesy of Susan Branz). More about Nonaka Sensei in "Flow Like a River: Takashi Nonaka and the Hilo Ki-Aikido Club" on the Aikido Sangenkai​ blog:

http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/takashi-nonaka-hilo-ki-aikido/
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