Profile

Cover photo
Jim Drobnis
Lives in West Bloomfield, MI
34 followers|36,255 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1'sReviews

Stream

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Got a great idea for a game? Why not make it a reality? Teach yourself the basics of game development with the help of these 4 websites: http://muo.fm/1dDluMT
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Our mathematics hangout begins in 15 minutes! See the world differently: https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/c5foveamcabfbpt4g3k34tq551g

image via http://abstrusegoose.com/275   #mathematics   #hangoutsonair  
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Pursuit of scalable, on-demand blood for transfusions could yield novel means of therapeutics delivery
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
34 people
Erik Ferry's profile photo
Travis Trestler's profile photo
Modern Family's profile photo
Kenya Safari's profile photo
Jack Bruni's profile photo
jeneliya dsuja's profile photo
Maham Naz's profile photo
Karen Haslam's profile photo
PBS's profile photo

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Here it is, the first Release Candidate (RC) built for Kodi 15.0; freshly baked and ready to be served!
http://kodi.tv/kodi-15-0-isengard-rc-1/
Here it is, the first Release Candidate (RC) built for Kodi 15.0; freshly baked and ready to be served! Although we said that Kodi 15.0 is a “clean-up” edition, we still managed to squeeze in a couple of really nice features. So far we had around 1050 code change requests which were included ...
54 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Kitty Doesn't Like Bath Time

AWWWW! Look how sad this cat is... Bath time is no good. Utter Betrayal is right! :)

Happy Caturday!

#caturday #cat #betrayal  
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
The MiniMAX is the world's smallest, most portable x-ray machine. Unlike its predecessors, which are a couple of feet wide and quite heavy, MiniMAX weighs five pounds. It can be whisked to accidents, crime scenes, battlefields, airports, sidelines, and any other place that could benefit from ...
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The US lags in life expectancy despite spending the most on health care http://bit.ly/1h4ZQBo
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Mice and Mustard Gas - A history of Chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy has odd origins - after observing war victims from World War I, researchers discovered that mustard gas applied to the skin of mice with an chemically-induced tumour resulted in a regression in the cutaneous tumour.

It is now one of the most successful treatments for cancer (despite its side effects). Cancer research UK recently said chemo was one of the main reasons that the 5-year survival rate had doubled over the last 40 years. Good news for cancer patients everywhere.

http://speakingofresearch.com/2013/11/20/mice-and-mustard-a-history-of-chemotherapy/
1
Add a comment...

Jim Drobnis

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
One in a Billion

Yesterday I talked about how some of Kepler’s data can be a bit puzzling, but there are lots of results from Kepler that are very clear.  After all, we now have more than a thousand confirmed exoplanets, many of which are from Kepler data.  This means we have enough planets to run a bit of statistics, and it leads to some interesting results.  For example, an article was published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) analyzing the statistical distribution of known exoplanets from the Kepler data.  This article is open access (woot!) and you can read it here: http://goo.gl/TXos1u.  

The focus of the paper was Earth-like worlds.  The authors defined “Earth-like” as meeting three conditions:

First, the star the planet orbits must be Sun-like, meaning it must be a G or K type main sequence star.  The Sun is a G-type star, and K-type stars are a bit smaller than our Sun.  This criteria excludes M-type main sequence stars (red dwarfs) which are much more common, but not very Sun-like.  

Second, the planet must have a diameter between 1 - 2 times that of Earth.  Because Kepler discovers planets that pass in front of a star, it is easier to determine a planet’s size than its mass.  But it is reasonable to assume that a planet about the same size as Earth will have a mass similar to Earth.  

Third, the orbital period of the planet must be between 200 and 400 days.  This is a rough way of saying the planet is in the “habitable zone” of its star.  Very roughly, we can say the Sun’s habitable zone is bounded by the orbits of Venus and Mars.  Venus has an orbital period of 225 days, and Mars 687 days.  Since the K-class stars are a bit smaller and cooler than the Sun, the 200 - 400 day range is a reasonable measure of potentially habitable zone.

One of the challenges of doing statistics is making sure you account for biases in your data.  In exoplanet data there are two potential biases.  The first is that larger planets in closer orbits are easier to find than smaller planets in farther orbits.  Another is that planets that could potentially be observed are missed because of noise in the data.  We find the easy signals, but miss the hard ones.

To account for the first bias, the authors looked at data from 42,000 Sun-like stars, finding 603 planets.  From this they were able to look at the distribution of planetary distances observed and extrapolated the data to larger distances.  To account for the second bias the authors put fake planetary signals into the Kepler data and then tried to “discover” those signals in the data.  From that they could get a handle on how many planets are “missed” in the real data.  With a handle on those potential biases, the authors could calculate the fraction of Sun-like stars with Earth-like planets in their habitable zones.


The results are pretty surprising.  Based on the statistics, it’s estimated that between 14% and 30% of G and K type stars have Earth-sized planets in their habitable zone.  There are about 300 billion stars in our galaxy, and about 60 billion of them are G and K type stars.  That means there is somewhere between 8 to 20 billion potentially habitable Earth-like worlds in our galaxy alone.

It’s hard to wrap your head around those kind of numbers, so here is another way of looking at it.  Suppose the Earth were a big blue marble.  Suppose all the other potentially habitable “earths” were marbles of a similar size.  If you put Earth and all the other marbles in a single container, there would be enough to fill a volume roughly the size of the great pyramid at Giza.

It is important to note that these are “potentially” habitable, meaning that they are at a distance where temperatures could allow for things like liquid water.  That doesn’t mean they are habitable, or that they have life.  Many could be dry planets like Venus, or have atmospheres that are too thin to support life.  It is possible that most of them are warm and wet like Earth, or that none of them are.  Right now we just don’t know.

But we do know the potential is there.  The potential of billions of earths in our galaxy alone, and there are about 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe.

That’s a lot of worlds waiting to be explored.

Image:  Kepler’s view of our galaxy (http://goo.gl/7u05Ms)
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
34 people
Erik Ferry's profile photo
Travis Trestler's profile photo
Modern Family's profile photo
Kenya Safari's profile photo
Jack Bruni's profile photo
jeneliya dsuja's profile photo
Maham Naz's profile photo
Karen Haslam's profile photo
PBS's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
West Bloomfield, MI
Previously
Greenville, SC - Middletown, CT
Work
Occupation
Mechanical Engineer
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Jim Drobnis's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Hunt for Dwarf Planet Ceres' Mysterious Water Begins : DNews
news.discovery.com

NASA's Dawn spacecraft is about to make its second and final stop during its exploration of the asteroid belt and it is already returning so

TeamViewer – Access your computer remotely and share your desktop with f...
www.teamviewer.com

Remote Control any computer within seconds as if you were sitting right in front of it and host online meetings and presentations easily ove

Trigger
play.google.com

Bored of putting your phone on silent every time you get into the office? Tired of turning off Bluetooth to conserve battery every time juic

Microsoft's reported 'Spartan' browser will be lighter, more flexible th...
www.pcworld.com

'Spartan could spell the future of Microsoft's browser technology: fewer compatibility issues, more multi-platform friendliness. It will rep

Lollipops, Cardboard, and barges: Google's 14 biggest hits and misses of...
www.pcworld.com

A tech company as big as Google is bound to do some amazing things every year, but it's also not immune to failure. Let's look back at where

Christmas (Deluxe Special Edition)
market.android.com

Christmas is the seventh studio album released by Canadian singer Michael Bublé. The album was released on October 21, 2011 in Ireland, Octo

Nvidia debunks moon landing conspiracies with new GTX 900-series 'Maxwel...
www.pcworld.com

If you weren't already convinced by Buzz Aldrin punching someone in the face, Nvidia would like a few words with you conspiracy theorists.

Setting Up Your Solidbody Electric Guitar (Part 1) | The HUB
thehub.musiciansfriend.com

In this tech tip, learn how to set up your solidbody electric guitar (Part 1) including stringing and straightening the neck.

Phonebloks
phonebloks.com

Support Phonebloks! A phone worth keeping by Dave Hakkens

The future of video games will be in your browser
www.pcworld.com

I’ve had it with interminable game downloads—and you can keep your fancy new Xbox, PlayStation, and Wii consoles. The future of PC gaming is

Tesla developing almost-autonomous car
www.pcworld.com

Tesla Motors plans to develop an autonomous vehicle within three years that will drive "90 percent" of the miles typically driven by a human

Private space race takes off as new firm heads for ISS - space - 17 Sept...
www.newscientist.com

Orbital Sciences is preparing to dock its Cygnus craft with the International Space Station, a move that could be a giant leap for science,

Here's how the iPhone 5s stacks up to the competition
www.techhive.com

The iPhone 5s was officially announced this morning, confirming pretty much all the rumors we’ve heard about the phone over the last couple

Earth's Largest Volcano Found
www.popsci.com

A megavolcano found at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean is being reported as the largest single volcano on Earth. Tamu Massif, as the megavol

New 3D printing DRM copies Netflix's moves to blockade physical pirates
www.techhive.com

Once 3D printing becomes mainstream, manufacturing companies fear that open season will basically be declared for piracy of physical goods—j

This Gadget Automatically Tunes Any Guitar In Seconds
www.popsci.com

Throughout their 23-year history, automatic guitar tuners have remained stubbornly complex systems that cost thousands of dollars and requir

Sunbots aim to slash the cost of solar arrays - tech - 16 August 2013 - ...
www.newscientist.com

A booming solar industry could use a robotic helping hand if it's to compete with fossil fuels as a global energy provider

Next-gen storage wars: In the battle of RRAM vs 3D NAND flash, all of us...
www.pcworld.com

Within a few years, you'll likely be carrying a smartphone, tablet or laptop with hundreds of gigabytes or even terabytes of hyper fast, non

First images of DNA mix-ups linked to cancer - health - 08 August 2013 -...
www.newscientist.com

Time-lapse microscopy has captured severed DNA strands linking up with partners from the wrong chromosome, a process implicated in cancer

Robotic plant learns to grow like the real thing - tech - 09 August 2013...
www.newscientist.com

A new system mimics the behaviour of roots and could help create robots that can adapt to many different facets of their environment

place is a bit shady looking but the guy working there was friendly and got me on my way as quickly as he could. truck was new and worked well.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
Good coffee. Went a few times and didn't have any bad experiences. But I drove by this morning and from the outside it appears to be closed. Not sure if it truly is but that's how it looks.
Public - 8 months ago
reviewed 8 months ago
5 reviews
Map
Map
Map
So unprofessional. If you have an appointment at 8 don't bother to get there early, like with any other clinic. Why does your name have the word "hospital" in it? Definitely not acute care. You can be waiting on their door step to get in with an anxious dog and they'll turn their heads and make you wait out there. Reluctantly they let me in at 5 til. Thanks... Once you get inside don't expect anything to get better. You'll wait on the chair while front desk ignores you and your dog, get taken back to a room to have a vet tech give up after 2 attempts of checking your dogs ears and say "well we just won't check your ears then..." Didn't attempt to give him treats or try soothing him down. No reinforcements or therapeutic behavior. Maybe it's just a bad Monday morning crew, but I wouldn't take any chances. Will not be going back. Your dog deserves better.
• • •
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago