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Scott Cohen
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Doctor Who RPG question:

I haven't run a game yet, but have had and love the RPG and the sourcebooks that I have already.

My question is on the Talker, Doer, Mover, Fighter thing. I think that it's a great mechanic that really brings the feel of Dr. Who to the forefront of the game. But in an example of play you had (don't have the book in front of me) a companion being attacked with the baddie making an attack roll and the companion rolling a social roll to resist it, which kind of messing things up for me. If this were any other game, that roll would make sense. In a game where there are specifically the Talker, etc, mechanics I don't get why the companion wouldn't have acted first and what have you.

Thank you for your help on this one! :)

I'm having an itch to do a G.I. Joe / COBRA hack using Cortex Plus Heroic. Power Sets would become Training (SEAL, Viper, Ninja, Sabotage, etc) with actual super like powers thrown in (like Zartan's various chameleon abilities). I'm actually really shocked that some form of Cortex Plus Military hasn't come out yet (that I'm aware of).

Just in the thinking out loud stage at this point. I have some other RPG goodness going on, so I'm not sure how much time I want to put into a hack.

Also, yes they were mercenaries and terrorists, but I always thought COBRA training and units were cooler than G.I. Joe. I mean, seriously, Shipwreck was a boatswain's mate, wore dungarees and the dog bowl, and was just one of the least interesting Joes. Heck, even though the Dreadknocks were stupid, they were at least interesting.

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I decided that I at least wanted to create the basics of the city in which my upcoming Urban Shadows campaign will take place. Just a name, backstory, and some city moves. The rest will be created by players in the campaign.

Inspired by Clive Barker's Cabal / Nightbreed and I took it from there.
Welcome To New Midian
Welcome To New Midian
docs.google.com

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I decided that I at least wanted to create the basics of the city in which my upcoming Urban Shadows campaign will take place. Just a name, backstory, and some city moves. The rest will be created by players in the campaign.

Inspired by Clive Barker's Cabal / Nightbreed and I took it from there.
Welcome To New Midian
Welcome To New Midian
docs.google.com
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A quick post about running a Dune RPG campaign on Roll20.

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A quick post about running a Dune RPG campaign on Roll20.

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A quick post about running a Dune RPG campaign on Roll20.
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So this Thursday, I'm going to be running my first US game. While I've never played it or run it, I've watched everything I could get my hands on in the form of videos of actual play and have read over the books, etc.

Question for you guys:

In mentally going over my prep for the session, I'm thinking up situations with actions that don't really have moves for them like "I want to kick in that door" or "I want to pick that lock" or "I want to hack a security system." The way that I understand the game, I have several choices.

A) Use a move that already exists - Unleash to kick down that door (even though the description specifically says it's not for that).

B) If the move becomes prevalent and important in the campaign it may be time to create a new move.

C) The action really doesn't mesh with what the system is trying to accomplish with it's move rolls, which is to say don't worry about picking that lock - if it should happen, then it happens in the fiction without the need for a move. Or that it's just not appropriate for the type of story that Urban Shadows is trying to tell, like hacking for example.

What is your general advice on situations like these? Thank you for your help!

So I've never actually played in a game of Leverage before, but I'd like to run one. I'm running an online Cortex Plus game now, but I'd really, REALLY like to roll some real-world dice and Leverage looks like a good idea for me.

Question about Leverage Assets compared to Firefly (which I have played a good bit) Assets: My impression is that Firefly Assets create reality while Leverage Assets, well, leverage reality. That's how I read the definition of Asset in each game. Is that correct?

This is to say, for example, that a character in each game is in a forest and wants to create a Knife Asset for some reason or another. While in Firefly that would work ("I had this knife on me the whole time"), my reading of Leverage is that creating an Asset only empowers an already existing item in the environment with now-it-really-matters-ness.

So in the Leverage game, since the character admittedly didn't bring a knife, and there are no knives around, then an Asset of that kind couldn't be created. Now if the characters in question were in a kitchen, both could create an Asset - the Firefly character's could be from their person or from the environment, while the Leverage character would give importantness to a knife already available in the kitchen.

The difference really does change things up from the norm that I've been working with under the Firefly rules, which is something to keep in mind as I run Leverage. With Leverage, a combination of the Asset rules as I understand them meshes well with the system's use of Flashback scenes to fill in those gaps where planning sequences didn't, kind of mimicking the Firefly version to an extent. Something along the lines of a Flashback wherein the character palms a knife from the dinner table before heading outside, therefore giving themselves that d6 Asset.

So I've been reading Urban Shadows for a while and am thinking of starting up a game. I am concerned a bit about the concept of corruption. It seems that the PC gets to flex their true supernatural (etc) muscles or roll badly 30 times in the entire lifetime of their character, including taking the remove corruption move advance, before it gets retired.

That just seems kind of harsh to me. I really expected more rules to mitigate corruption than just the one advance when I first began reading up on the game.
Something like a penance move. Or am I missing something?

Do you guys find this limiting of the fun in your games or am I overreacting to how much and how quick the average character will burn through those 30 instances?

Thank you for any insight! :)
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