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Morgan Mcintire
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Morgan Mcintire

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Good... Good... Now figure out how to jump start a car with a Cellphone battery :-P
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+AvE HAHA. not sure if I want to know ;-)
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Morgan Mcintire

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I would use climb cutting for this type of machining, your tools will last longer (due to less rubbing). I don't use SprutCAM, But I think that the reason your waterline roughing isn't machining to full slot width is part of the machining strategy that SprutCAM uses. When cutting a waterline cam programs use clockwise circles (when conventional milling) (climb-milling would use counter clockwise circles) however each time that Sprutcam finishes a circle it makes a linear move to the next circle. so at the end of one pass one side of the slot will have a smooth finish(left side on conventional and right side on climb) while the other side will be wavy (which Sprutcam thinks it needs to fix). the only way to remove that effect would be to use both climbing and conventional-milling.  Like I said I don't use SprutCAM so I may be wrong. But This would typically be the cause In Mastercam or Gibbscam
So Try switching milling type to "Both" and tell me how that goes :-) That should remove the need for a return pass..
However to be completely honest, I would run It with climbmilling (to increase tool life) and delete the rest of the code after the first pass.

By the way. The "Expert Machinists" rarely have any real secrets, almost anything that is taught as "Professional" you can find by looking on the internet. and most of the time The difference is professional machinists have some different techniques for machining that just aren't adaptable to the "small shop machinists", "hobbyist" and "learn at home guy", Just due to the fact that we have access equipment that is simply not affordable to the typical hobby machinist.
BTW, I have been watching your videos from the sidelines for a long time Though I never really, took the time to comment much before. I just want to say That I love all the little projects you do, It is a lot of fun watching you over the years.
-Morgan
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Morgan - thanks for chiming in!  great info here - going to go play with the "both" versus "climb" and see what i get
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Is this your first CNC build? if so welcome to the addiction ;-) Looks like you bought a pretty nice prefabbed kit. everything looks nicely machined and well planned out.

While your spindle mounting method is "effective" in the sense that it "works"  you really should have squared it to the z-axis movement, or at least left room for adjustment later on. This would make Tramming possible later on. That way you could get the spindle perfectly square to the table.
You won't have any problems when using small 1/8" - 3/8" or 1/2" end mills, however if and when you use larger spoilboard cutters and fly cutters measuring 1" - 2.5"  for surfacing larger areas you will see ridges forming perpendicular to the axial misalignment, even very small axial misalignment can show in the final machined product depending on the cutter type / diameter and material being cut.
you can do some alignment X-axially using shims on the top and bottom of the spindle mount. but I don't see any way for you to align Y-axially without machining the mount holes into short slots or just increasing the hole size slightly.
anyhow looks like your motormounts are machined for a nema 23 frame. do you have the motors and electronics yet?

Always have fun and Get 'er Done!
-idontrunntoofast
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+Morgan Mcintire Visual cadd is easy to use.  It's cad only.  It originated from the older dos based "Generic Cad" which is from the late 80's.  Basically a windows version of the Generic cad.  I do have the free Sketchup on my computer.  Haven't messed with it much.  Can you get g-code from it or can a cam program get it?  I do have Dolphin cad-cam.  Haven't messed with it much either.
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Morgan Mcintire

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Some pictures of the bike. as you can see it will probably remain a "for part's only" bike.
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while this was funny has hell you do realize that when measuring materials that are of the same temperature as the calipers (and of similar thermal expansion) they cancel each other out. this of course doesn't apply to aluminum and plastics etc. because their thermal expansion is much different from steel.
but in those cases all you have to do is calculate the linear displacement due to temperature change
for example steel has a linear expansion of 9.7e-6 inches per inch per degree Fahrenheit (in/(inºF))
aluminum is 12.3e-6" and hdpe is 67.0e-6" using a formula like D=L(a)(t0-t1) where L=initial length a= linear expansion constant t0 = initial temp and t1=final temp you can easily calculate the linear expansion difference.
 there are databases of linear expansion constants of every material that exists.

 I use a lot of "el cheapo" calipers for a lot of miscellaneous stuff. they are pretty dang accurate for how cheap they are.. and when they are broken I don't shed a tear, I grab a new one and keep rollin. Of course I use my mitutoyo calipers whenever it is something of importance. :-)
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perhaps ;-) Keep making great videos AvE ;-)
BTW I am not really surprised you stuck those nice mitutoyo calipers in your deep freezer. it's not something I would have done... so I am Interested any lasting effects on the calipers (moisture on the electronics) (are the ones you have "coolant" proof ;-) ?)
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Wow I am super envious right now.. I actually operate a HAAS ST-35Y turning center at work, which is a pretty powerful (and large machine) Not to mention having a Y axis is awesome. But seeing how it is technically not my machine I don't have free reign to make my own parts on it... I wish I had a nice machine like yours at home (need to look into getting one). I couldn't afford the ST-35Y seeing how it costs something around 125k

BTW, If I were you I would get a digital touch probe and use that... using paper to gauge work offset is risking a accident.
And I am not familiar with Tormach's controls But I can see in the interface there is a "Set G30" option.  just move the tool a safe distance and set the G30.  I am sure you have already figured that out though seeing how you posted this video about a week ago. :-) Have fun with your lathe!
-Morgan
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Great Job Robert! turned out pretty nice, are you going to surface the spoilboard? or is your t-track too close to the surface? sorry I haven't been following your last couple of videos. I've been working non-stop for the past few weeks and haven't had any time for anything else.
I plan on being back home within the next week or so and I am going to start planning my latest (and very belated) cnc project. I've never done these types of videos so I don't know how they will turn out. I guess that the best place to start is recording is the design... I am not too sure how interesting that will be... mostly just a lot of 3d / 2d design and calculations a bunch of mistakes... redesigns n stuff...

Btw I suggest that you get to cooling that Spindle soon. Those little 2.2kw motors can burn up real quick if not properly cooled. It may not feel hot to the touch but that is because there is a space between the outer case and the motor housing to allow for the water to flow through.
I recomend the xspc 750 pump and reservoir and a 240 mm dual fan radiator. I have been running a 2.2kw with this system for a while and it keeps it at room temp even during long cuts in aluminum.

-Idontrunntoofast
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Thanks!  I'll be surfacing a spoil board if I'm routing out a pocket, depending on how critical it is.  If just doing a profile, I won't worry about it being surfaced.  I believe the table is within about .010 at the worst at any given point.  I'm working on a dust shoe now.  Next video will be of that.  Then comes the water cooling.  I've got a circulating pump that my father in law gave me.  I'm going to find a reservoir and try that for cooling first, but thanks for the tip.  I wish I had a 2.2 kw, mines only the 1.5 kw.  The main thing I don't like about the smaller spindle is the collet limitation.  It uses the ER11 and largest bit you can use is 1/4" shank.  But it will do for now.

The videos take some time.  I always record way more than what ends up on youtube.  The editing takes a lot of time also.  Thanks again!
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Nice going Robert,  You are almost there. just a few last things to tackle! Don't you just hate waiting for parts? :-(
btw are those plates 3/4" thick... SERIOUSLY? those are some beefy looking plates....
Anyhow. I was going to tell you what I do to get the ballscrews perfectly lined up..
1. Mount the ballscrew bearing supports for both ballscrews loosely to either side of the machine not so loose that they jiggle around but loose enough to move by hand and give just a bit of space to each side for adjustment..
2. mount the Ballscrew nuts solidly to the moving surface that is solidly attached to your linear movement (in this case your gantry) and move them all the way to one end as far as it will go.
3. you can now tighten your bearing supports on that end.
4. move the entire gantry to the other end of the table as far as it will go.
5. Tighten the bearing supports on that end.
6. Profit?.. Your ballscrews are now perfectly aligned. :-)
BTW. I am going back home this weekend and I plan to begin the design process for my new machine. I'll probably post the videos as sort of sped up with a voiceover sort of thing.. I don't know... I'm not used to recording everything I do...

Anyway...
 Always have fun and Get 'er Done!
-Idontrunntoofast
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Sounds like a much simpler way of getting them trued.  Wish I'd thought of that, would have saved some time.  Thanks for the tip though.  I'll remember that if I ever build another one.  The Z axis plates are 1/2" thick and the two Y axis ball screw mounts are 3/4" on the motor end and 1/2" on opposite end.  Good luck on your new machine, keep us posted.
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