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Anne O'Day Orthodontics
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In everything there is a piece of truth. But a piece.
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An American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) study shows that of the total number of orthodontic patients in 2010, about 3,440,000, or 8.2%, were children from 8 to 17 years old. Adult patients comprised 2.5% for a total of 1,075,000. The study estimates that as the population grows, each AAO member will have 44 more patients in 2015 as compared to 2010.
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Bread today is better than cake tomorrow.
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About 30% of all orthodontic patients in the United States are adults. Every year, more and more adults are having orthodontic treatment to correct the various types of malocclusion(or poor bite) such as crooked, overlapping or twisted teeth. Modern orthodontic braces are now less obtrusive, so many adults are willing to wear them for treatment.
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Not all closed eye is sleeping, nor open eye is seeing.
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At any given time, there are more than 4 million Americans wearing braces. Most of them are kids and teens. However, more than 800,000 adults are also receiving orthodontic treatment and their numbers are increasing every year. The huge numbers of people receiving orthodontic treatments prove the widespread prevalence of malocclusion and other orthodontic problems.
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Virtuous find joy while Wrongdoers find grieve in their actions.
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In the early 1900s, gold, platinum, silver, steel, gum rubber and vulcanite were used to form orthodontic devices such as loops, hooks, spurs and ligatures. Orthodontists also routinely used 14- to 18-karat gold for wires, bands, clasps, ligatures and spurs since gold is easy to shape. They also used iridium-platinum bands and archwires and platinized gold for brackets.
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Simplicity and clarity should be the theme in your dress.
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During the late 1930s, stainless steel became available as a material for braces and other orthodontic appliances. However, it was not yet widely used by most orthodontists at that time because using it was considered somewhat controversial. Stainless steel was only generally accepted as a material for orthodontic appliances during the late 1950s and early 1960s.
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