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Pauline Yu
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Pauline Yu

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If Jared Diamond says so, perhaps people will listen? Not just any other #eschatology , more like, are you ready for a non-technological dystopian future?
The Pulitzer-winning author explains why he adapted his classic book "The Third Chimpanzee" for kids: because we need them to fix our mistakes.
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Pauline Yu

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"Chief Specialty Editor of Frontiers Ugo Bardi, a professor of physical chemistry at the University of Florence, said in his resignation announcement that Frontiers had "shown no respect" for the paper's authors and referees, and that the journal's actions reflected a "climate of intimidation" around climate science."

Another Nature Publishing Group ethics fail.
 
Climate change trolls threaten journal; journal caves and retracts paper because.....reasons?; reviewers complain; scientists complain; editorial board resigns; Trolls win either way. UGH.
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Pauline Yu

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Whoa, OK maybe going a little heavy on the next-gen sequencing does pay off.
#scienceeveryday  
 
"While discovery of the cause itself is noteworthy, the method by which it was determined could have a profound effect on how wildlife mortality events are investigated in the future. Described in a study published today, April 16, in the journal Nature Communications, the researchers call this new approach "forensic genomics." It involves a combination of field surveys, toxin testing and genomic scans.
In the case of red abalone, the finding was the result of fortunate timing.
"Just months before the mortality event, we had sequenced the entire genome of several red abalone in the same area," said co-author Laura Rogers-Bennett, a senior environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife working at the UC Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory. "What we had, in essence, was a baseline, so we went back to the same site after the mortalities and did a whole genome scan of the survivors."
With both sets of data in hand, they compared the two groups using a computer program and found a set of clues that pointed them in a very specific direction.
"Parts of the genome were significantly different than what you'd expect by chance," said Rogers-Bennett, an affiliated faculty member of the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center at UC Davis.
When they investigated those outliers, they found that their function was to aid in detoxification. The results supported their hypothesis that a harmful algal bloom producing a Yessotoxin was the major cause of the mass mortality rather than exposure to other potential toxins".
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Pauline Yu

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This is a great feature story -- anyone who has shot a lot of different types of film knows the inherent color biases of the stocks. I never liked Kodachrome for its overly warm yellowed tones (Instagram has an automatic filter for this I think--I'm almost positive lomo makes a film that specifically replicates this color palette.) Fuji brand films all tended towards strong green and blue tones making it fantastic for nature landscape photography. I'll have to learn more about Ms. McFadden's work to elucidate what kinds of films she has tried. I'm really curious to know how these biases are determined by manipulated chemistry.
When Syreeta McFadden was young, she dreaded being photographed. Cameras made her skin look darkened and distorted. Now a photographer herself, she's learned to capture various hues of brown skin.
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My favorite scene from Frozen Planet. I've never dived under the ice myself, but I've been in an under-ice "observation tube" and seen these structures. It still amazes me that the supercooled brine can freeze the surrounding seawater so fast that the echinoderms can't escape in time.

#antarctica #frozenplanet
 
"Brinicle: A brinicle (brine icicle, also known as ice stalactite) forms beneath sea ice when a flow of extremely cold, saline water is introduced to an area of ocean water, being the undersea equivalent of a hollow stalactite or icicle."

#sciencesunday  

Read more at http://www.viralnova.com/strange-weather-phenomena/#Ch8j2p7HRCOuhSE3.99
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Christopher Gabbert's profile photoKristin Gleitsman's profile photo
 
Mine, too! Makes me shed some brine of my own for the poor lil' guys.
 
I was on the ice when it first cracked. Their field team was next to my cubicle and they had major deployment delays that year. The government shutdown had a negative effect on the monitoring project in the field -here's hoping our foreign collaborators can collect data them on our behalf.

#scienceeveryday #antarctica #climatechange  
For the past five months, NASA scientists have been tracking a rather large iceberg that separated from the front of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier. Measuring some 20 miles (33 km) long and 12 miles (20 km) wide, the so-called "ice island" has now drifted out to sea.
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+Annalee Newitz gives a great deconstruction of the problematics of gendered language in discussing genital anatomy.
Earlier today, scientists announced they'd discovered an insect with a new kind of female sex organ. It looks a bit like a penis, and is called a gynosome. But almost every news outlet covered the story by describing the insects as "females with penises." This isn't just painfully wrong -- it's bad for science.
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This suggests that the whole system needs to be structured. The 5-fold increase in unemployed postdocs in two years is a disturbing trend.
 
A sobering look at the PhD pyramid scheme by the numbers: Where will a biology degree take you?
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Pauline Yu

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This is so cool. I'm looking forward to watching this series.
 
The Real Darwin Fish
Why creationists hate Tiktaalik.

By Chris Mooney

If evolution is true, and if life on Earth originated in water, then there must have once been fish species possessing primitive limbs, which enabled them to spend some part of their lives on land. And these species, in turn, must be the ancestors of four-limbed, land-living vertebrates like us.

Sure enough, in 2004, scientists found one of those transitional species: Tiktaalik roseae, a 375-million-year-old Devonian period specimen discovered in the Canadian Arctic by paleontologist Neil Shubin and his colleagues. 
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So you know how those geoengineers want to fertilize the ocean with iron? Turns out they should be mining whale poop.

#scienceeveryday #ironfertilization #geoengineering #whales  
Whales are famous for spouts and blowholes. Turns out there's another whale opening that's just as important, but I'm too polite to mention it.
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Prof. TBD Marine Science Hire
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Not the professor of Chinese literature. 
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Larval biologist