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M. Mitchell Waldrop
Works at Nature Publishing Group
Attended University of Wisconsin-Madison
Lives in Washington, DC
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M. Mitchell Waldrop

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Proposed Equivalency Between Wormholes & Entanglement
The quantum source of space-time: http://www.nature.com/news/the-quantum-source-of-space-time-1.18797

I included this article in the most recent Digest but wanted to revisit it for those who missed it because I find it fascinating. At heart this concerns the pursuit to unite the incompatible fundamental theories of quantum mechanics and general relativity, and specifically the attempt to cast quantum entanglement as the fundamental basis of geometry and a defining feature of spacetime and the geometric gravity described by relativity. While not yet proven the approach seems elegant from a number of different angles, tying together concepts from holographic Universe theories, anti-de Sitter spaces & boundary membrane equivalences, tensor networks, and quantum error-correcting codes. 

When the entanglement between two regions in the model is reduced the areas pull apart, and when it reaches zero the regions split off entirely, suggesting that entanglement is necessary for space to exist. Examining the relationship from a different angle suggests that a wormhole connection between two regions and an entanglement connection between two regions are the same thing but on a vastly different scale. They are different ways of describing the same underlying reality. 

Much theoretical development is still needed: while the relationships and connections are tantalising the models still do not accurately describe major features of the Universe we seem to find ourselves in and most lacking of all is an adequate treatment of that most fundamental of things: time. 

One question I have arises from considering that this approach stems from a foundation of quantum theory to derive the equivalences as part of the large theoretical field of quantum gravity. But I wonder if others could approach the same phenomena from a foundation of general relativity to derive the same equivalences? Might this also be a fruitful line of inquiry, to treat entangled particles as mini wormhole connections and thus build particle physics up from there? 

The quantum source of space-time: http://www.nature.com/news/the-quantum-source-of-space-time-1.18797

#entanglement   #gravity   #geometry  
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Ron Cowen's tour de force of explaining the weirdness of it all....
 
“You can think of space as being built from entanglement.” bit.ly/1lruxG8
Many physicists believe that entanglement is the essence of quantum weirdness — and some now suspect that it may also be the essence of space-time geometry.
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My article on 'active learning' and it's discontents -- finally out in Nature!
Active problem-solving confers a deeper understanding of science than does a standard lecture. But some university lecturers are reluctant to change tack.
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After the ACLI Capital Challenge:
The Flaws of Nature in all their glory! From left to right: 
Rich Monastersky, Matt Crenson, Me, Boer  Deng and Sara Reardon. 
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Our trip to Copenhagen -- cold and drizzly in November, but beautiful!
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All singing and all dancing -- the Top 100 papers of all time, complete with animation, podcast and interactive graphics!

They're not the papers you'd think....
Nature explores the most-cited research of all time.
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Very interesting and very nicely written. Thanks for sharing. One sentence puzzled me: "the foothills comprise works that have been cited only once, if at all — a group that encompasses roughly half of the items". A massive amount of working hours and resources might have been invested in those. Is this, to some extend, a lost productivity? 
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To battle #sexism, some scientists are taking to Twitter. Is it working?
 bit.ly/1PoF2Gs
Social media is shaking up how scientists talk about gender issues.
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The far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, is seen as it crosses between our 'EPIC' camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite, and the Earth - one million miles away. Check it out: http://go.nasa.gov/1Dq0IOh #EarthRightNow
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Zeeya Merali​'s quest for the roots of quantum weirdness. http://goo.gl/1i5ALk
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Nature reporter Erika Check Hayden is in Sierra Leone tracking the Ebola epidemic. Don't miss her diary!
Nature reports from the front line of the epidemic.
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'In what might be the most ridiculous aspect of the whole thing, the bill forbids scientific experts from participating in "advisory activities" that either directly or indirectly involve their own work. In case that wasn’t clear: experts would be forbidden from sharing their expertise in their own research — the bizarre assumption, apparently, being that having conducted peer-reviewed studies on a topic would constitute a conflict of interest. "In other words," wrote Union of Concerned Scientists director Andrew A. Rosenberg in an editorial for RollCall, "academic scientists who know the most about a subject can’t weigh in, but experts paid by corporations who want to block regulations can."'
The "reform" measure makes room for industry-funded experts on the EPA's advisory board
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What are the most highly cited research papers of all time?

Not the ones you'd think...
Nature explores the most-cited research of all time.
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Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Journalism (MA), 1975 - 1977
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Physics (PhD), 1969 - 1975
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Mathematics (BS), 1965 - 1969
  • Frank L. Ashley High School
    1962 - 1965
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
August 22, 1947
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Married
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Introduction
Currently, I am a features editor for Nature magazine, working out of the Washington, DC, office. In my distant past-1975-I earned a Ph.D. in elementary particle physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Two years later, in 1977, I earned a Master’s in journalism at Wisconsin. From 1977 to 1980 I was a writer and West Coast bureau chief for Chemical and Engineering News. From 1980 to 1991 I was a senior writer at ­Science magazine, where I covered physics, space, astronomy, computer science, artificial intelligence, molecular biology, psychology, and neuroscience. From 1991 to 2003 I was a freelance writer, and from 2003 to 2006 I worked in media affairs for the National Science Foundation. I am the author of Man-Made Minds (Walker, 1987), a book about artificial intelligence; Complexity (Simon & Schuster, 1992), a book about the Santa Fe Institute and the new sciences of complexity; and The Dream Machine (Viking, 2001), a book about the history of computing. In my spare time I am an avid cyclist. I live in Washington, D.C. with my wife, Amy E. Friedlander.
Bragging rights
Interviewed Steven Hawking (1988). Rafted the Grand Canyon (2009). Ran the Marine Corps Marathon (2011 & 2012)
Work
Occupation
Reporter and Editor
Employment
  • Nature Publishing Group
    Features Editor, 2008 - present
  • Freelance
    2006 - 2008
  • National Science Foundation
    Media Officer, 2003 - 2006
  • Freelance
    1991 - 2003
  • Science magazine
    Reporter, 1980 - 1991
  • Chemical & Engineering News
    Reporter, 1977 - 1980
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Augusta, GA - Greenville, SC - Griffin, GA - Columbus, GA - Pensacola, FL - Providence, RI - Pittsburgh, PA - Richmond, VA - Gastonia, NC - Chapel Hill, NC - Madison, WI - Palo Alto, CA - Washington, DC
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Nature America, Inc. 968 National Press Building 529 14th Street NW Washington, DC 20045
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