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Chuck Kopczak
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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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Post has attachment
LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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LAKE MCDONALD
There are those who claim the ability of humanity to change environmental conditions on Earth is extremely limited. For example, it is common to hear people say that the idea that humans could be altering Earth’s climate is arrogant, and the Earth is far too large and complex for our puny efforts to have any noticeable effect. But there is plenty of evidence that humans can make noticeable changes to the environment, on scales that certainly encompass the entire globe.

Lake McDonald, in the western section of Glacier National Park in Montana, is the largest lake in the park. Carved by glaciers, it is 10 miles (16.1 km) long and nearly 500 feet (152.4 m) deep. And since it’s tributary streams are largely fed by snowmelt, the waters are crystal clear. The overall setting gives the impression of a pristine landscape, untouched by the hand of humanity.

It is, largely, but there are indications that even a place like Glacier National Park, as seemingly isolated from areas of large-scale urbanization as it is, cannot escape the human influence. In 2014, a study conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, focused on mercury levels in fish in 21 national parks located in 10 Western states (see link below). While the majority of fish across the region had concentrations that were below most benchmarks associated with impaired health of fish, wildlife and humans; whitefish and bull trout in Lake McDonald had mercury concentrations that approached or exceeded the EPA criterion for protection of human health and the level at which reproductive impairment to fish-eating birds could occur.

The occurrence of such high levels of mercury in a relatively isolated location speaks to the interaction of human industrial processes with natural cycles and processes. Mercury can be injected into atmospheric circulation patterns after being vaporized in certain industrial processes. This mercury can then be distributed to almost any point on the globe. Unfortunately, mercury levels in fish in Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park is but one small example of the power of human industrial society to reshape environmental conditions on Earth.

Keep this in mind the next time you hear someone say it is silly or arrogant to think that humans can do anything that would alter the Earth’s climate. We can, and we do.

Today’s photo was taken at Glacier National Park in Montana with a Canon EF17-40 mm f/4L USM lens zoomed to 20 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk. III. It is a High Dynamic Range (HDR) composite of nine exposures. All exposures were taken at f/19 and ISO 400, while the shutter speed varied from 1/500 sec. to 1/60 sec.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/lakemcdonald.htm
http://missoulian.com/mercury-in-fish/pdf_a0dfb94c-c817-11e3-9f02-001a4bcf887a.html
http://missoulian.com/news/local/study-finds-mercury-tainted-fish-in-glacier-s-lake-mcdonald/article_3417c98e-c809-11e3-8453-001a4bcf887a.html

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SIZE DIFFERENCES
Many species of animals exhibit distinct differences in the sizes of the male and female of the species. Differences between males and females of a species, whether the differences are in size, coloration, or seemingly decorative enhancements, are termed sexual dimorphism, meaning different forms based on the sex of the individual in the species. Notable examples include the Indian peacock (Pavo cristatus), African lions (Panthera leo), humans (Homo sapiens), peacock spiders (Maratus spp.), and elephant seals (Mirounga spp.), among many others.

Found along the Pacific coast of North America from the Aleutian Islands to Baja California, the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) exhibits distinct sexual dimorphism, with males weighing as much as 4,500 pounds (2,000 kg) and measuring up to 15 feet (4.6 m) in length, while females usually weigh no more than 1,500 pounds (600 kg) and measure no more than 10 feet (3 m) in length. Their southern hemisphere cousin, the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) is even more dimorphic sexually, with males weighing as much as 8,150 pounds (3,700 kg) and measuring up to 19 ft (5.8 m) in length with females weighing 1,980 pounds (900 kg) and measuring 10 feet (3 m) in length.

Such physical differences between the sexes in a species seem to be driven by the differences of all the selective evolutionary pressures experienced by the males as compared to those experienced by the females. In the case of the northern elephant seal, males fight to control areas on the beach occupied by large groups of females, with the winners usually being the larger, more aggressive males. Larger size in males may also increase their reproductive success, by allowing them to stay in the breeding area longer by utilizing bigger energy reserves in their blubber.

For whatever the full set of selective pressures that resulted in the sexual dimorphism of elephant seals, the size differences are extreme. In today’s photo, a male northern elephant seal is clearly much larger than the female in front of him.

This photo was taken at the northern elephant seal rookery at Piedras Blancas on the California coast with a Canon EF100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM lens zoomed to 285 mm on a Canon EOS 5D Mk III. The exposure was set to 1/500 sec at f/6.3 and ISO 800.

To see more photos and blogs, visit www.chuckkopczakphotography.com.

Sources:
https://www2.nau.edu/~gaud/bio300b/sexdi.htm
http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/blogs/9-most-dramatic-examples-sexual-dimorphism
http://www.amusingplanet.com/2012/12/meet-most-gorgeous-peacock-spider.html
https://allyouneedisbiology.wordpress.com/tag/jumping-spiders/
http://www.pinnipeds.org/seal-information/species-information-pages/the-phocid-seals/southern-elephant-seal

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