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Talysman the Ur-Beatle
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My latest post on spell points as a physical resource includes two tables that might actually be relevant to other situations: a "reaction roll" table for contaminated or damaged spell resources and a table for depletion of arcane resources.

The depletion table is the easiest to adapt. You roll 3d6 vs. Intelligence to see if you find the resource you are looking for, and you cross-reference the result with the table to see how future rolls will be affected. A Depleted result means that future rolls will be vs. half effective Intelligence, making the resource scarcer in that area. Resources can be temporarily or permanently exhausted. The main tweaks you would make for other situations is to decide how many "free" rolls to make before checking for depletion/exhaustion, and deciding whether the resource is renewable or not.

The damaged resource table is for when the resource is waterlogged or mixed with contaminants, which can have three main effects: Dilute (possible spell failure,) Taint (possible backfire effect,) or Ruin (unusable.) Adapting this to other situations, such as water damage to books and scrolls, requires a decision on which of those effects apply to the resource and what they would mean. In the case of non-magical books and scrolls, Diluted would mean the ink runs, blurring the letters and requiring an Int check to decipher, while Taint would not apply and Ruin would mean a totally unreadable book or scroll.

#odnd # random #table

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Occasionally, people want house rules to add a spell point system to D&D. Even though the first time I played OD&D back around 1976, it was a house-ruled spell point version, and years later ran The Fantasy Trip and GURPS, I generally steer clear of spell point systems because they are too number-oriented. I like Vancian magic.

But I just whipped up a spell point system for OD&D that I'd say is not number-oriented, because the spell points represent physical resources that you use up to cast spells. That mean clever players can try to overstock on spell points, temporarily lose them, steal them from enemy wizards, or otherwise manipulate them as physical objects. I'm thinking of using this as the alternate magic system for elves.

Here's the blog post link.

#odnd #magic #spellpoints

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I'm still doing my series on alternative methods for random dungeon generation that are more likely to create loops. These all assume you are modifying one of the existing dungeon generators, for example Appendix A in the AD&D DMG, in order to improve the ways corridors connect.

The latest post focuses on a variant of rolling for a corridor's destination. It's not as likely to produce loops as the first method I described (pre-loading loops into the corridor structure using leximorphs,) but with enough corridors, some are bound to intersect, creating the necessary loops.

#dnd #random #dungeon


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I've been doing a series on changing random dungeon generators to produce more non-linear "Jaquayed" results. I'm not going to link to that... instead, I'll link to FrDave's post at the Blood of Prokopius blog where he took one of my techniques for a test-drive and created this random dungeon.

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My suggestions on designing puzzles for dungeons: avoid riddles except as an extra clue to a puzzle, focus on simple puzzles of three types: One of These Things is Not Like the Others, Analogies/Relationships, and Memory Games. There may be another equally simple puzzle type, but none are coming to mind right now. Most other potential puzzle types seem to be about obfuscation or increased difficulty for these three, for example forcing players to remember something outside the dungeon instead of something they saw in another room.

Anyone have any ideas about puzzles that don't fit one of those types? Or variations on the three?

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My latest suggestion for reusing the magical research rules: use it for improvements to a barony.

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A recap of my comment in a forum thread about legendary weapons. Legendary weapons aren't enchanted by a wizard, but become magical because of heroic deeds. Again, I went with reusing the magic research rules to cover investment costs and to set a chance for becoming legendary.

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I wrote something up about holy shrines. The basic idea: don't give NPC priests levels, just assign the spells/miracles to the shrine instead. One benefit of this that I didn't mention was that it encourages adventure: if you want to cure disease and don't have a cleric that can cast it, you don't just find any old NPC cleric, you seek out the shrine known for curing disease. It's a place you have to travel to, not something you can advertise around town for. And if you want a local shrine that will provide multiple services on demand, consider investing in a shrine and praying for the miracles you need.

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I discuss a way to allow non-magic-users to cast spells by using scrolls. This is aimed at designing worlds where most of the population is normal (Level 0) and only the PCs and a handful of NPCs have class abilities, while still including some kind of magic. Also, it's "realistic", in the sense that it resembles the kind of magic people believed in, historically.

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Because +Erik Tenkar​ used the term "Lawful Stupid" when he posed a discussion topic about alignment, I started to complain... then I decided that what was really needed was better support for noble acts, So I wrote up a rough draft of a Virtuous Acts Reaction Table that you'd roll whenever a character did something noble against their own best interests.

#dnd #alignment


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