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Edward Frenkel
1,517 followers -
Mathematician, UC Berkeley professor, author, filmmaker
Mathematician, UC Berkeley professor, author, filmmaker

1,517 followers
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My film (with Reine Graves) "Rites of Love and Math" premiered in Paris 7 years ago and has played at several film festivals and special screenings (and a clip was shown on the Colbert Report). Now, for the first time, the entire film (26 min) is made freely available online, in high definition, in the new video magazine Labocine of Imagine Science Film Festival (at the Labocine link below). Enjoy! :)

For more on the film, see

http://edwardfrenkel.com/film

http://ritesofloveandmath.com

(Note: if the film does not buffer fast enough, adjust the resolution to best fit your bandwidth in the lower right corner of the viewer.)

#loveandmath

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Here's a video of my conversation with the great Nonduality (Advaita) teacher Francis Lucille at the "Science and Nonduality" (SAND) Conference last October: "A Scientist's Mind Meets the Heart of Reality"

If you find it interesting, visit the SAND website for more:

http://www.scienceandnonduality.com/

and consider giving your support. SAND's dedicated work on fostering awareness, sanity and peace is especially important today.

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In the age of "alternative facts," Math is our last line of defense for the Truth. Pythagoras theorem is true no matter what Trump, or anyone else, would say. No one can ever win a "war with math." Math lovers of the world, unite! :)

"Mathematical knowledge is unlike any other knowledge. While our perception of the physical world can always be distorted, our perception of mathematical truths can't be. They are objective, persistent, necessary truths. A mathematical formula or theorem means the same thing to anyone anywhere -- no matter what gender, religion, or skin color; it will mean the same thing to anyone a thousand years from now. And what's also amazing is that we own all of them. No one can patent a mathematical formula, it's ours to share.

Rich or poor, black or white, young or old -- no one can take these formulas away from us. Nothing in this world is so profound and elegant, and yet so available to all."

---from "Love & Math"

#MathTrumpsLies
#LoveandMath
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Here they are, 450+ students of my Multivariable Calculus class at UC Berkeley. First lecture, a new beginning.
A selfie without a self :)
#allsmiles #happy #loveandmath
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IMAGINE that: As part of President Erdogan's crackdown on democracy in Turkey in the aftermath of the coup (and in fact this crackdown has been going on more quietly for a long time), it was announced today that all Turkish academics will be banned from foreign travel:

http://wapo.st/2aa8G5H

As the result, my friend Betul Tanbay, the President of Turkish Mathematical Society, was banned from traveling to Berlin, where she was to present the IMAGINARY exhibition:

https://imaginary.org/project/imaginary-turkey

Betul kindly sent me the extra slide she sent to Berlin to be included in the presentation that someone else will give on her behalf. (This reminds me of the dark years of the Soviet Union, when academics were also banned from traveling abroad, to the great detriment of the country's science and technology.)

Read this slide. And let's imagine a world in which bigots, dictators, and religious fanatics have no place. Let's wake up and make this world our reality.

To friends in Berlin: please go to this exhibit to support our Turkish brothers and sisters.

To friends in Turkey: please stay safe and be strong.

To all friends: please remember that the fear- and ego-driven assaults on our freedom by all the Erdogans and Trumps of the world stand no chance when we are guided by LOVE instead of fear.
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"Each definition is a piece of secret ripped from nature by the human spirit... But [Russian mathematician] Luzin believed that 'naming' was a two-way street, involving both losses and gains. When one named something, Luzin thought, one gained an effectiveness of 'new successes due to definitions,' but one at the same time also lost what he called 'the foggy and dark parts our intuition whispers to us'... To him, the entirety of an object is far greater than its individual characteristics that can be named or described."

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Today, 15:00-17:15, I give the first 2 lectures of my 6-lecture mini-course "Langlands Duality in Math and Physics" at Institut Henri Poincaré in Paris. I will also speak on Wednesday and Thursday. More details are here: http://www.ihp.fr/en/node/17973/#jTab2
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This new paper (joint with David Hernandez) took about 3 months to write, but it was many years in the making. I'm always fascinated by this alchemic process in which a link (kind of a metaphor) between two areas of math that seem so far away from each other (in this case, "quantum integrable systems of KdV type" and ordinary differential equations known as "affine opers") can serve as a translation device, enabling us to get a new result in one area after progress is made in another. For details, see

http://arxiv.org/abs/1606.05301
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What is Infinity? Here's my short answer to this infinitely fascinating question in The New York Times. No prior knowledge is required. Hope you enjoy it. Also, check out the video at the end.

Quote: "We have many ways to connect to infinity: through art, through poetry, through love. But mathematics gives us perhaps the most cerebral and logical way to connect to the infinite. So in this day and age, when we tend to put more trust in rational arguments than in other types of arguments, mathematics becomes our portal to infinity.”

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"I see all these kids under tremendous pressure — rarely pressure that they understand the origin of. So many of these super-talented kids are just going through the motions, and aren’t passionate about their studies at all, and that’s terrible. I was like that too. I’d given up on ever trying to live up to my parents’ expectations, but somehow because I’ve had Ramanujan as a guardian angel, things have worked out well for me."

---From Ken Ono's interview with Quanta Magazine. I completely agree with him. I see how destructive this kind of pressure can be for some of my students, and it's heart-breaking. We really need to talk more about this. That's why Ken's new book "My Search for Ramanujan" is so important. Not only does he candidly share his personal story to which many can relate, he also describes how the life and work of the genius mathematician Ramanujan helped him to find his way. This book is an inspiring tale of perseverance and passion. I highly recommend it:

http://www.amazon.com/My-Search-Ramanujan-Learned-Count/dp/3319255665

Ken did a great job as a consultant and associate producer of the beautiful Matt Brown's film "The Man Who Knew Infinity" about Ramanujan, which I also highly recommend.
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