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Afaa M. Weaver
Poet, Playwright, Translator, Fan of Chinese Culture
Poet, Playwright, Translator, Fan of Chinese Culture
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The Old Chestnut's ears look about as big as my head, about which much could be saId in jest, I suspect. In the great wash of what is and what could be, the reference here is to the accelerating melting of the arctic ice, I feel a need to do something specifically concrete for my progeny, the littlest of whom is starting to understand that crawling backwards can lead to learning how to stand. When I feel a need to act on their behalf, I remind myself how little I know about the future, which is quite different from the past, which depends on remembering. I remember how I came to love horses. www.magichorses.org
Afaa Weaver's Blog
Afaa Weaver's Blog
magichorses.org
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What happened to Baltimore? "So I'm writing, Dear Reader, to celebrate the gift of being a poet, the gift of gratitude for my lineage. In the Smithsonian, my portrait sits right next to that of Langston Hughes, whose secretary, George Houston Bass, mentored me in the deeper meanings of that lineage during my studies at Brown University. My tradition and influences surround me in the panel. Lucille Clifton helped ground me in my intuitiveness, and my deeper sensitivity in my twenties."
East Baltimore Muse
East Baltimore Muse
eastbaltimoremuse.blogspot.com
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What Happened to Baltimore?
Immortal City, Immortal Heart       Visit the Magic of Horses The Academy of American Poets                                                                                                            by Afaa M. Weaver                                         ...
What Happened to Baltimore?
What Happened to Baltimore?
eastbaltimoremuse.blogspot.com
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Jeffrey Bingham Mead interviews me regarding my travels in Taiwan and China and my work with Chinese poets as a translator and facilitator of cultural exchange programs. My work has been about utilizing poetry and translation as bridges to cultural communication. My work began with my Fulbright Scholar appointment to Taiwan in 2002, when I taught at National Taiwan University, and Taipei National University of the Arts.
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My comments on the context of the two new anthologies by Norton and Jacar Presses of poetry written toward social justice. What is a poet's relationship or responsibility to his/her country?
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"At Simmons College, I have a quiet office on the same floor as the president and the dean. I have an endowed chair. After eighteen years at the college, I have too many books in my office, so I am rotating out those I know I will never use. I have taken a pre-retirement package and am aligning myself to devote more time to my writing. I am happy to have several manuscript projects in the works. When students asked me to support them in their protests at Simmons, I showed up. I spoke up. All the things I have seen in life began to play before me like a film. I thought of times in the past when I should have spoken, or when I should have said more. To these students I pledged my unflinching support. I can say it’s because I know racism is real in academia as it is elsewhere. I can say that, but something even deeper and more pervasive calls to me, which is the right of the young to claim their own lives and their right to change in a world I know is much more complex than it was when we danced in the streets.
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Looking forward to this issue....:-)
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After teaching at Bread Loaf, here is a celebration: To actualize your "self" is to make something of your life, which is to create from the potentials you think you have. To realize this actualization by seeing it work in another person's life in the way it has worked in yours is affirming. 
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"Law & Order in the African American Soul"
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"Stealing away...Baltimore, Black Women Leaders, Black Culture: The problems facing black Americans are rooted in slavery and malicious, misguided policies that have continued since the Civil War. As Angela Glover Blackwell (founder and C.E.O. of PolicyLink), Stewart Kwoh, and Manuel Pastor point out in Uncommon Common Ground,  Roosevelt’s New Deal ensured racial inequity when Roosevelt gave in to demands of powerful Southern conservatives and allowed key pieces of the legislation to exclude blacks and minorities.  However, some of today’s conservatives would still like to blame Baltimore’s ills on liberal policies."
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